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Australian Wine Blogs

Australian Wine Blogs

04 July 2022

Australian Wine Blogs Australian Wine Blogs
  • Pizzini Round up 2022 – Part 2!
    04 July 2022

    Pizzini produce some of Australia's best expressions of Italian grape varieties. Wine reviews by Lisa Johnston (thewinemuse).

    The post Pizzini Round up 2022 – Part 2! appeared first on winemusing.

  • Sami-Odi 'Mahé & Ribo' Syrah
    04 July 2022

     Sami-Odi is in the house! I reviewed the 2015 Sami-Odi 'Mahé & Ribo' Syrah a year ago, and I am interested to see how it has further developed. Today, I show the other side of the bottle.


    This time, I find more complexity in the fruit profile. Blackberry, blueberry, and red fruits all show. There is some typical Shiraz sweetness on the mid-palate, but not too much. Mocca and spice flavours appear. This is quite a balanced and attractive full-bodied wine. It is bigger than the Hoffmann Dallwitz I reviewed a few days ago, but this is not a fat or overripe wine. In fact the flavours start to drop off on the back palate. This is compensated by firm, but mellowing tannins. There is a silky long finish. This wine still has many good years ahead.

    Score: 95/+++


  • In Portugal enjoying the lows and highs of international travel & diving into Bairrada
    03 July 2022

    It’s now been 3 odd years since my last long-haul international flight, so why not start back with a bang?

    This week I’m in Anadia, Portugal, judging at the Concours Mondial Bruxelles sparkling session. It’s the first time that Concours has held a wine show focussed solely on fizz, and it makes judging at the show a very different experience. No black teeth!

    But it’s not the judging that has been the differentiator this time around – it was the wild ride to get here.

    You can skip ahead to the wine part if you like, as the region where this was set, Bairrada, is nothing if not interesting. Firstly, I’m going to vent about flight plans.

    (more…)

    The post In Portugal enjoying the lows and highs of international travel & diving into Bairrada appeared first on Australian Wine Review.

  • Adelina McLaren Vale Shiraz
    02 July 2022

     Adelina is a relative newcomer with wines from Clare Valley (their home) and McLarenVale. Its recent 2021 Adelina McLaren Vale Shiraz received high praise from many critics.


    If you plan to drink this wine now, you need to decant the bottle for a number of hours at least. My review is based on a tasting on day two, when the wine has settled some.

    This wine is red fruited, very fresh, with some green apple flavours, somewhat unusual for Shiraz. The wine is not unripe, but certainly lives at the early envelope of ripening. It is a very vibrant wine with firm acidity and chalky tannins. Think of it as the antithesis of Torbreck, perhaps.

    I think all the elements are there, including fruit quality, but it has pushed modernity a bit far for my liking. And the wine needs to soften. It is definitely great value at its price.

    Score: 91-92/+




  • Jean-Marc Brocard Chablis Valmur 2018
    02 July 2022

    2018 is a warm vintage in Chablis and the Valmur grand cru vineyard faces south and west, maximising sun exposure. So to the wine buyer spending $100+ on a grand cru wine, this is a potentially challenging crossing of “warm and warm”. The wine however stands up very well. It does although take a little time to reveal itself, tasted blind, as typical of Chablis. In the glass, it has phenolic and oyster shell aromas, with more of the former than the latter. The palate is dry, its acidity refreshingly high and the length very good (a 20 second plus finish). There appears a well judged contribution from at least 9 months in old oak; Brocard’s website does not appear to make the tech specs available to confirm. This is early to approach a grand cru Chablis, but it is certainly drinking well now. It should drink well for another decade. ★★★ June 2022

    The post Jean-Marc Brocard Chablis Valmur 2018 appeared first on Grape Observer.

  • Huntington Estate Grand Reserve Basket Pressed Shiraz 2019
    02 July 2022

     

    An excellent Mudgee Shiraz that is destined for even greater things given more time in the bottle. 

    It's long and balanced and a damn fine drink. It whisks you away - you're captivated by its depth and drive yet its savoury beauty captivates and keeps your interest levels heightened.

    Meaty and dense early highlighted by pan juices, burnt ends and beef stock, swirl the glass and it continues to further express itself. Dark chocolate and Dutch cocoa, sauteed mushrooms, a flash of cola and sarsparilla, even a bit of boot polish - the layers keep unfurling. Give me more! It softens to reveal dark chocolate dipped dark cherries and a suggestion of licorice. The length, the depth, the pleasure... Bravo!

    Drink to ten years+

    95/100

    Region: Mudgee
    RRP: $80
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

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    These reviews are free to access and take time to compile. 
    The author does not receive any payment from the wineries for writing these reviews.
    Please consider a donation:

  • Crittenden Estate The Zumma Chardonnay 2020
    02 July 2022

     


    Chardonnay for those times you want to feel fancy. There is some bling and glitter factor here. Perhaps it's the charismatic swagger it possesses? Delicious and then some, another glass please.

    Lemon juice, plump ruby grapefruit and white-fleshed stonefruits create an attractive landing strip that hooks you in. Settle back and sink into your chair that little bit deeper, vanilla whispers to you with a hint of biscuit. Time in the glass reveals a chicken stock note but that grapefruit tang just glistens. An impressive and layered Chardonnay. An afternoon sesh is calling.

    Drink to eight years.

    94/100

    Region: Mornington Peninsula
    RRP: $57
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 

    These reviews are free to access and take time to compile. 
    The author does not receive any payment from the wineries for writing these reviews.
    Please consider a donation:

  • Juniper Estate Three Fields Sauvignon Blanc Semillon 2019
    02 July 2022

     

    There is some serious complexity about this Sauvignon Blanc/Semillon blend from Margaret River. Another great release in Juniper Estate's Three Fields range.

    The fruit was whole bunch pressed and saw 10 months French oak (20% new). Scents of gooseberry, green melon, green apple and dried grass lay a solid platform with each flowing through to the mouth with ease. It develops some great momentum, too, delivering great width as well. An 80/20 blend, this is well made and will be sure to please. Well done.

    Drink to three years.

    92/100

    Region: Margaret River  
    RRP: $29
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 

    These reviews are free to access and take time to compile. 
    The author does not receive any payment from the wineries for writing these reviews.
    Please consider a small donation:

  • Huntington Estate Special Reserve Chardonnay 2021
    02 July 2022

     

    A Chardonnay that got better the longer it sat in the glass.

    Interesting aromas of oats and barley early, lemon juice threads its way through the core. Some cashews, nougat and lemon zest make a move with a biscuity feel too. I was scratching my head a little though. It just seems at odds with itself and doesn't mesh as much as I'd like but the bones of quality are still there. There's a tang but the oak feels clunky. Maybe it's me? Maybe give it more time? Given the choice for now I'd take the Estate

    Drink to five years+

    88/100

    Region: Mudgee
    RRP: $40
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 

    These reviews are free to access and take time to compile. 
    The author does not receive any payment from the wineries for writing these reviews.
  • TarraWarra Estate J Block Shiraz 2018
    02 July 2022

     


    Co-fermented with 2% Viognier, I was expecting a bit more given the quality of the past, but not to be.

    Quite flat and not overly exciting, this comes across in some respects as being quite one dimensional. From what is regarded as a very good Yarra vintage, I was looking hard for that varietal spice and generosity. Curiously, it is $10 cheaper than the previous release, a wine I very much enjoyed. Some flashes of dried herbs add savoury touches but the finish pushes me away with slippery silty tannins. Already with four years of age under its belt, I'm not sure more time will aid this.

    86/100

    Region: Yarra Valley 
    RRP: $35
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 

    These reviews are free to access and take time to compile. 
    The author does not receive any payment from the wineries for writing these reviews.
    Please consider a small donation:

Wine Investment blogs

Wine Investment Blogs

04 July 2022

Wine Investment Blogs Wine Investment Blogs
  • Wine & Spirits Investment Report June 2022
    29 June 2022

    Stocks take an even bigger dive lately this month, the Nasdaq has had regular down days with a current year-to-date loss of -25.81%. The dow Jones has lost -13.31% year to date. As the turmoil unfolds in the stock market, the wine market is like fresh air in comparison. Invest in a hard asset like […]

    The post Wine & Spirits Investment Report June 2022 appeared first on Invest in Wine & Spirits with Sure Holdings.

  • Wine & Spirits Investment Report March 2022
    29 June 2022
  • The Road to Wine Wars II (and a 30% Discount Offer)
    28 June 2022

    My new book Wine Wars II will be released in just a few days on July 1, 2022, and so. in the spirit of shameless self-promotion, let me remind you that you can order Wine Wars II in paperback or e-book format from Rowman & Littlefield, Amazon.com, and other online and bricks-and-mortar book sellers.

    Rowman & Littlefield is offering a 30% discount on Wine Wars II publisher-direct purchases for a limited time. Scroll down to the bottom of this page for details.

    Tantor Media will release the audio-book version of Wine Wars II (read by Jonathan Yen) on July 15, 2002. It will be available everywhere audio books are sold. Ten hours of fascinating stories about where global wine is going and how it got there.

    A Tale of Two Glasses

    Paperback, e-book, audio. Wine Wars II is everywhere!

    Wine Wars II updates and extends the most important arguments I made in the original Wine Wars and then adds a new set of chapters on Wine’s Triple Crisis. Each “flight” or set of chapters ends with suggested wine tasting so you can consider the arguments using all your senses. What fun!

    Here is a brief excerpt from chapter 1 “A Tale of Two Glasses” for your reading pleasure. It talks about the origins of Wine Wars and the development of Wine Wars II. I think it is interesting that the road to Wine Wars II began with a winery visit about forty years ago, when the problems facing the wine business and the economy more generally were a lot like those we confront today.

    HOW I STUMBLED INTO THE WINE WARS

    People often ask me how I became a wine economist, an economist who studies the global wine markets. The answer is rooted in a particular time and place. Sue and I were still newlyweds, taking a low-budget vacation in the Napa Valley back in the day when that was still possible. We were headed north on the
    Silverado Trail late on our last day, pointed toward our economy motel in Santa Rosa, when we decided to stop for one last tasting.

    The winery name was very familiar, and I had high hopes for our tasting. If I had known more about wine back then, I would have recognized this as one of the wineries that kicked French butt in the 1976 Judgment of Paris wine tasting. We pulled off the road and went in to find just the winemaker and a cellar rat at work. No fancy tasting room back then, just boards and barrels to form a makeshift bar. They stopped what they were doing and brought out a couple of glasses. If I knew more about wine back then, I would have been in awe of the guy pouring the wine, but I was pretty much in the dark. So we tasted and talked.

    I started asking my amateur questions about the wine, but pretty soon the conversation turned around. The winemaker found out that I was an economics professor. Suddenly he was very interested in talking with me. What’s going to happen to interest rates? Inflation? Tax reform? He had a lot of concerns about the economy because his prestigious winery was also a business and what was happening out there in the financial markets (especially interest rates and bank credit, as I remember) had a big impact on what he could or would do in the cellar. Wineries, especially those that specialize in fine red wines, have a lot of
    financial issues.

    In addition to the initial investment in vineyards, winery facilities, equipment, and so forth, each year’s production ages for two or three years, quietly soaking up implicit or explicit interest cost as it waits to be released from barrel to bottle to marketplace. The wine changes as it ages, but the economy changes, too. It’s impossible to know at crush what market conditions will be like when the first bottle is sold. Wine economics is a serious concern. Few winemakers are completely insulated from the business side, and sometimes the economy can have a huge effect on what winemakers get to make (if they have the resources to stick with their vision) or have to make (if they don’t).

    And so a famous winemaker taught me to think about wine in economic terms and to consider that supply and demand sometimes matter as much as climate and soil when it comes to what’s in my wineglass. I should have known.

    Although my interest in wine and economics merged on that Napa day, it sat on its lees for a long time, as I waited for an opportunity to link my personal passion with my professional research agenda. The two naturally converged a few years ago when I began writing what turned out to be a four-volume series
    on the global economy. My 2005 book Globaloney: Unraveling the Myths of Globalization includes a chapter called “Globalization versus Terroir,” my first attempt to write about wine economics for a general audience. Globaloney argues that complex global processes shouldn’t be reduced to a few simple
    images. Globalization and food are more than just McDonald’s, for example, and globalization of wine isn’t just McWine.

    The wine chapter in Globaloney gave me confidence that I had more to say about money, wine, and globalization, so I launched a website called The Wine Economist (WineEconomist.com), where I could work out my ideas in public, make connections, and develop a wine voice. After several years and nearly
    200,000 words of blog posts, The Wine Economist evolved into the first edition of this book.

    THE ROAD TO WINE WARS II

    I wasn’t sure if anyone would want to read about the business of wine, but I was wrong. Wine Wars was warmly received by both critics and readers. It turns out that while wine is good, wine and a story is even better, and stories about the business side of wine can be very interesting. A number of wine industry readers have said that Wine Wars helped them connect the dots and see things more clearly. Consumers, who have no particular business connection, say they just like knowing the backstory of their favorite drink.

    I’ve spent the last decade on the wine road speaking at wine industry conferences around the world and learning more about wine and the people who make it. It is a tough job, but someone has to do it, and apparently I am that lucky someone! I have recorded my impressions and experiences in hundreds of columns on The Wine Economist.

    Wine Wars has been joined by three other books that continue my analysis of global wine: Extreme Wine (2013); Money, Taste, and Wine (2015); and Around the World in Eighty Wines (2017). Wine Wars celebrated its tenth birthday in 2021, and that occasion made me stop and think (as round-number birthdays sometimes do).

    The powerful forces that I identify in Wine Wars are still important, but they’ve changed in ways both big and small. Environmental and demographic shifts, for example, re now much more clearly understood as wine industry challenges. There is a lot to think about and to write about. And so I have written this new book, Wine Wars II, which updates the first edition and extends its argument to address wine’s global crisis.

    In a way, this journey has brought me back to that dark cellar on the Silverado Trail in Napa Valley, the great wines we sampled that day, and my “aha!” moment when I realized that wine and economics are a perfect pairing. I’ve learned much more about wine and wine economics, and I appreciate now more than ever the many challenges that the world of wine faces. But I remain an optimist, as I show in this book. I still have grape expectations.

     

  • A Guide for Investors: Ways on How to Properly Store Wine
    27 June 2022

    Wine is a unique asset class. It is scarce, offers a potentially high return, has low correlation with other asset classes, and provides a hedge against inflation. Unlike many other assets, wine is also highly durable, does not lose value when left in storage for long periods, and is an attractive object that looks good on your walls. It can even be passed on to your children, grandchildren and beyond in a way that other assets cannot.

    But that does not mean that wine is the best investment for everyone. To be a successful investor, you must be realistic about your appetite for risk and return expectations. You should also know how to select good quality wines, and how to store them.

    Wine is commonly stored in a wine cellar or a wine closet, which makes for an ideal location for long term storage of wine, but there are a few things you need to know to guarantee your wine investment is stored properly. We’ve compiled a list of ten helpful tips to store wine properly in order to ensure your investment is protected and will be worth its value down the line.

    Beware of Extreme Temperature Fluctuations

    Temperature fluctuations can have a negative effect on wine, and although it varies across wine varietals and regions, there is a general rule: the higher the quality of your wine, the more you should be mindful of temperature.

    Consider the Ideal Wine Storage Conditions

    A well-ventilated space that is at least partially exposed to natural light is preferable to a dark space that is not ventilated. That’s why many people like to store their wine in a closet that is part of the kitchen.

    Wine racks should also be stored in a place that is out of direct sunlight and away from other appliances such as the TV, microwave, and air-conditioning units.

    In terms of humidity, if you are storing wine in a room with high humidity, its flavour might be altered by high humidity, as it will bring out excess moisture in the glass and cause the corks to soften, rot and leak more easily.

    On the other hand, if you are storing wine in a room with low humidity, the flavour might be altered by low humidity, as it might cause the corks to dry out, shrink and create air gaps, which prevent the wine from breathing.

    In addition, you should store a bottle of wine horizontally. Storing wine vertically can put pressure on the cork, and it might dry out and shrink. This can then let air into the bottle, and the wine will spoil.

    Consider Wine Storage Options 

    There are four main ways to store wine:

    Wine Cellar

    A wine cellar is specifically designed for wine storage. They are generally climate controlled, to keep the temperature and humidity at consistent levels, and they are made of materials that absorb sound and reduce vibration. The best wine cellars come equipped with a humidifier and a dehumidifier to ensure the ideal humidity levels for long term storage.

    Wine Armoire or Wine Cabinet

    A wine armoire or cabinet is a decorative piece of furniture designed to store wine. They are generally used for short term storage, for 30-60 days before drinking, as an alternative to a wine cellar, or for storage of your wine collection. They are usually made of wood, lined with polyethylene or polypropylene, both of which are inert and free of wood-based volatiles. The most expensive cabinets are made of stainless steel and lined with polyethylene or polypropylene.

    Even if it is not made of the same materials as a wine cellar, a wine armoire or cabinet is the best place to store your wine if you don’t have a cellar.

    Wine Refrigerator

    Storage conditions for storing wine at the correct temperature are usually those that are too cold for your average refrigerator. Unless a refrigerator is specifically designed for wine storage, it’s not suitable for your wine.

    A wine refrigerator, however, is designed specifically for wine storage, and will keep the wine at the correct temperature for the length of time you specify. They usually come with a humidity control system that will keep the temperature at the optimal level and the relative humidity at around 75%, unless you’re specifically storing sparkling wine, which should be stored at 60%. A wine refrigerator is the best wine storage option for long term storage.

    Bonded Warehouse

    A bonded warehouse allows you to store your wine in an optimum storage environment, which is temperature and humidity controlled, free from daylight and vibration and under ultimate security measures.

    This is the best storage option for investment wines and for long term storage where the provenance of the wine is highly important. Find out about Cru Wine’s wine storage facilities here.

    Think about the Ideal Wine Storing Temperatures

    As a general rule, the older the wine, the colder the temperature of storage has to be to prevent it spoiling. Wine should be ideally stored at around 11 to 14°C. The temperature should never go beyond 24°C. Aside from age, the temperature should depend on the alcohol, tannins and fruit content.

    Light-to-Medium-Bodied Red Wines

    Light-to-medium-bodied red wines, such as Pinot Noir, Merlot and Zinfandel, are best served at a temperature of 14°C to 15°C. These wines come with higher concentrations of tannins and acidity and lighter alcohol, which means they taste better slightly cooler than room temperature, which is around 18°C to 20°C.

    Full-Bodied Red Wines

    Full-bodied reds such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Bordeaux and Syrah, are best stored at a temperature of 16°C to 17°C. These wines are usually full of tannins, which can taste bitter if not given enough time to soften. These wines are produced with higher alcohol and a higher concentration of fruit. These wines can be exposed to air for a longer period of time without them spoiling, so these wines can be served a bit warmer than the light bodied ones.

    Dry White Wines

    Dry white wines, such as Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay, are best stored at a temperature below 18°C. These wines are produced with higher acidity, so they taste best at a cooler temperature. If you are not sure how to tell if your wine is dry or not, look at the label. If you see the word “dry” on the label, your wine is dry.

    Sweet White Wines

    Sweet white wines, such as Port and Madeira, are best served at a temperature between 13°C and 15°C. These wines are produced with higher sugar content, so they taste better at a warmer temperature.

    Sparkling Wines

    Sparkling wines, such as Champagne and Asti, are best served at 16°C to 20°C. These wines are usually produced with higher acidity and lower alcohol, which means they will spoil quicker than any other wine if the temperature is too low or too high. These wines are usually served with a special system that allows the gases to be released without letting any oxygen in.

    How Long Can Wine Be Stored

    There are many factors that determine how long your wine will be able to keep, but the best way to tell if your wine is going bad is to smell it. If you notice a change in smell or taste, then there is a chance it is going bad. In addition, if your wine is going bad, you’ll notice that the liquid will start to evaporate from your wine. This can result in a change in the taste and smell of your wine.

    There are a few exceptions to this rule, such as Cabernet Sauvignon, which can taste better if it has a bit more oxidation. The best way to avoid spoiling your wine is to invest in a good wine storage system, and check it at least once a month.

    Your Takeaway for Proper Wine Storage

    You should now know the importance of storing your wine in the right conditions, and be aware of some of the pitfalls you might come across when storing wine. The best way to make sure your wine stays in the best condition possible is to invest in a good wine storage system, and check it at least once a month.

    Cru Wine can help you get started on how to invest in fine wine and guide you on how to properly store your wine with the right storage solutions. Let us help you get an incredible wine investment experience! Contact us today to get started!

    The post A Guide for Investors: Ways on How to Properly Store Wine appeared first on Cru Wine Fine Wine & Spirits Shop.

  • Creating a New Bordeaux
    25 June 2022
    Cult Wine Investment has been offering Bordeaux En Primeur (EP) since the outstanding 2009 vintage. Over the years, we have forged strong relationships with producers and negociants across the board. In 2021, Chateau Angelus, one of the most iconic chateaus in Saint-Emilion, even agreed to launch the first-ever wine-related NFT with us!
  • Our journey with Bordeaux En Primeur
    25 June 2022
    Cult Wine Investment has been offering Bordeaux En Primeur (EP) since the outstanding 2009 vintage. Over the years, we have forged strong relationships with producers and negociants across the board. In 2021, Chateau Angelus, one of the most iconic chateaus in Saint-Emilion, even agreed to launch the first-ever wine-related NFT with us!
  • La La Land
    24 June 2022

    24.06.22 – Fine Wine Investment –

    We are drawing inexorably to the close of this year’s en primeur campaign and the release prices are unfortunately pretty much in line with the gloomier prognostications. Very few bargains thus far, plenty which defy reality, and others which, as we shall see, are notable but unfortunately not for their relative attractiveness. If anything they have drawn attention to back vintage opportunities, but if you have a helpful algorithm you don’t need the hallucinations of hopeful chateau producers to achieve that.

    We note with interest that a lot of the 2019s have been in demand of late and we can attribute this directly to the current release prices. 2019 was a very good year, and the reasoning goes that if such a good vintage costs less than the relatively poorer 2021 then that must represent good value. Unfortunately that reasoning is flawed, because it presupposes that the release prices are the “right price”. We would strongly suggest that this is nonsense. How so?

    Well for a start if the en primeur prices were “right” the “wine futures” would be flying off the virtual shelves, and history suggests that this often simply doesn’t happen. A lot of the wine is “left with the underwriters”, in this case the negociants, or otherwise never actually leaves the chateau cellars. In addition, to take Ducru Beaucaillou as an example, why might you pay £1,908 in full for forward delivery of a wine which most critics suggest might sit at around 95 points, from an indifferent vintage, when you can buy a 98 pointer from 2019 (a good vintage) for around £1,800?

    Your correspondent has just finished the last bottle of a case of 1996 Gruaud Larose bought en primeur back in the day, so was interested to see this year’s release price. Gruaud isn’t really an investible fine wine because it is at that awkward lowish price point which is impacted negatively over time by storage charges, but it certainly tastes fab. With a score barely creeping into the 90s an attractive price would have been around £600, but what’s this? £744! Shan’t be picking up any this year.

    Although this is very much the story of another missed opportunity by the producers, there are a couple of stand-out bargains, and from top names to boot. Just over a week ago Lafite priced its 2021 offering which has received an average critical score of 96, a creditable effort in a challenging year, at £5,808. Had they followed the route of many others and priced it near the 2019 they would have charged £8,000. This is a highly laudable strategy, not just to the benefit of potential investors, but also for themselves further down the line. Why might we say this?

    We try to talk a lot at Amphora in mainstream investment market parlance, not because the fine wine market is mainstream, or anywhere near it, but because it helps to frame investment decisions. In mainstream markets initial pricing is vital to engender a positive after market which benefits investor and issuer alike. If an offer is priced incorrectly not only will it be difficult to get away, but a poor after market will reflect badly on the issuer. We see this a lot in our market place with producers like Latour, who price fresh tranches of back vintage wines at premia to existing freely available stock. Performance languishes as a result.

    As a test of the validity of our way of thinking we will closely monitor the performance of Lafite 2021, as we will Lafleur, who also priced attractively. Even more attractively than Lafite. They have crafted a 97 pointer, equivalent to 2017, 2018, and 2020. 2018 and 2020 were superior vintages to 2017, and the wines are priced at over £14,000 and £12,000 respectively. The 2017 costs over £8,000 so they could have been excused for approaching that sort of figure, but if you have been lucky enough to pick any up it will have set you back only £6,508. Again, we expect this to have entered very willing hands and will watch with interest what happens to the price over time.

    Regular readers will be aware that at Amphora we love L’Eglise Clinet, believing it, as a house, to be one of the most undervalued in the market. That does not, however, blind us to its failings, and although its 2021 wine, with a score of 95, (strictly speaking 94-96) may not seem to have been over-priced against the two prior vintages (nor should it have been, obviously) it seems to be trying to use the en primeur campaign as a tool to lever its way into a higher price point. Who knows, this may work, because the market doesn’t seem to be finding its own way to what we would suggest are fully deserved higher prices.

    The difficulty is that L’Eglise Clinet has so many back vintages that are as good as the 2021, (2006, 2008, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2017) and they are all at a considerable discount to the current offer price of £2,500. 2008 was a great year in Pomerol and the 95 point wine costs £1,500. The work of an arithmetical moment will suggest to you, quite correctly, that this is a 40% discount.

    If you think that’s bad spare a glance at L’Evangile. They have made an excellent wine, to be sure, at 95 points (again, could be 94 when it goes to bottle, could be 96), but it has come out at a higher price than everything bar 2005 and 2009, (looking back 2 decades). It is a hopeful strategy, to say the least, but we won’t be picking any up at these levels.

    We will keep a close watch on all of these but the evidence suggests that the more coherently a wine is priced, the better its performance over any time frame. Needless to say if you have any particular favourites about which you would like our opinion please just ask and we’ll give you a clear analysis.

    The post La La Land appeared first on Amphora.

  • Cru Wine named among fastest growing companies in the UK
    24 June 2022

    Fine wine specialists Cru Wine has been named one of the UK’s fastest-growing, founder-led private companies in the inaugural FEBE Growth 100 list.

    Backed by former BBC Dragons Sarah Willingham and Jenny Campbell, the FEBE Growth 100 ranks UK-based privately-owned businesses by compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in sales over the past two financial years and recognises founders who have led, and continue to drive their businesses, to deliver significant sales revenue and consistent profit.

    Placed 51st overall with an CAGR of 64.91%, Cru Wine were the only fine wine brand to feature in the list and were amongst a small number with less than 20 employees. Other brands recognised included Huel, Gousto and Bloom & Wild.

    Gregory Swartberg, founder and CEO said: “I am extremely proud of this incredible recognition of the business we have built over the past decade.”

    “It is a fantastic achievement to be listed alongside some huge British brands and business owners and is a testament to all the hard work our team have put in despite the difficulties we have faced during the pandemic.”

    To be considered for the FEBE Growth 100, businesses must be UK registered, independent, unquoted, and an ultimate parent company, meeting the following criteria:

    • Sales between £3m and £200m
    • Trading for at least three years
    • An operating profit in the latest financial year
    • Founder(s) must still be involved

    You can view the full 2022 FEBE Growth 100 list here.

    The post Cru Wine named among fastest growing companies in the UK appeared first on Cru Wine Fine Wine & Spirits Shop.

  • How to Value Fine Wine: A New Investor’s Quick Guide
    24 June 2022

    If you want to make a profit on your wine collection, you should know how much it’s worth. How can you accurately determine the value of your bottles? There are several steps to take to value your wine, and those steps are described in this article.

    How to Value Fine Wine: A New Investor’s Quick Guide 1 – Region

    The first factor to take into account is the region. The wine is originated from. Some wines are limited in production, so they can be very rare and valuable. For example, a wine originating from a very small region, with a small number of parcels, could be very rare and have a high value.

    2 – Overall Appearance

    The wine could be in a very good condition, such as having no cracks and not being oxidized. If the cork is still intact, then this is also a factor because it can help to preserve the wine. A bottle with beautiful labels is also a good sign that the wine is worth keeping.

    3 – Bottling Date

    A bottle from an old vintage year will be considered valuable. Such bottles are very rare and are therefore highly valued.

    4 – Quality and Aroma

    Second, you want to check the quality of the wine. Does it have a good aroma and taste? Does it look clean and attractive? If you have an expert with you, ask him/her to taste it and say whether it’s a good quality or not. If it’s good quality, then it should be priced accordingly.

    5 – Scores from Critics

    A wine’s value is also impacted by reviews from critics and awards. Critics and awards are a great way to measure the quality and taste of a wine, as well as its potential value.

    6 – Scarcity

    If a wine is well-established with increasing demand, it has a great potential value. This can be enhanced with a good reputation and reputation, as well as an overall very good quality.

    7 – Brand Equity

    The value of the wine can also be impacted by brand equity. If it’s a brand of wine with a big reputation and a big brand, then it’s a good sign that the value of the bottle is high.

    8 – Availability

    Finally, the availability of the wine is also a crucial factor. If a wine is produced in very small quantities, then its value is likely to be high. This is because it’s a rare commodity.

    Take, for example, a wine from a very good vintage year, with a small number of bottles available. You can use these points to value your wine.

    9 – Aging Potential

    If a wine is meant for long-term ageing, then it can have a higher value. If you want to save the bottle for your old age, then you need to know that it can be kept for 20 years or even more. If it has a great potential for ageing, then you can increase its value.

    Ways to Find Out The Value Of Your Wine 1 – Get a Professional Opinion

    Firstly, you can get a professional opinion from a wine expert. They can evaluate the wine and identify it. The expert can also assess the wine’s quality and decide on its value.

    2 – Look at Online Reviews

    Online reviews are another great method to get a good opinion. If your wine has a good reputation, then it’s a sign that it’s valuable. You can also get some advice from experts, as well as other investors, on a wine forum or in a wine club.

    3 – Use Online Wine Valuation Tools

    Another way to determine the value of a wine is to consult an online tool that specializes in valuing wine. It’s the best way to find out the current value of your bottle and to see what the potential value is. You can get the label value and then based on the wine’s current vintage year.

    4 – Check Auction Prices

    Another way to find out the value of the wine is to look at auction information. The information will show you the prices that the bottle is sold for. You can check it with several websites such as Wine-Searcher or Wine-Searcher.

    5 – Understand the Market

    The last way to find out the value of the wine is to understand the market. If you want to invest in fine wines, then you should know the market and its trends.

    By understanding the market well, you’ll be able to invest in the right wines and get the best value.

    6 – Look into the Wine Source

    Investing in fine wines is not just about the value of the bottle. It’s also about the source of the wine. You can get information through the bottle’s label.

    You can get information such as the wine’s origin, the year of the vintage, the producer and bottler, and even the price of the bottle. This will give you an idea about whether the wine is good and if you should spend your money to buy it. You will be able to see if the wine is valuable or not.

    Know How Much Your Wine Is Worth!

    Now you know how to make a profit on your wine collection, but before you do so, you should set out to determine the value of your bottle. It’s best if you consult a professional to get the best evaluation. Just use the points above to determine how much the bottle is worth.

    If you are planning to penetrate the fine wine market, come to Cru Wine! We make buying wine made easy and simple with a more enriched experience. Shop with us today!

    The post How to Value Fine Wine: A New Investor’s Quick Guide appeared first on Cru Wine Fine Wine & Spirits Shop.

  • Ask Yourself These 10 Questions Before Investing in Fine Wine
    24 June 2022

    Building your own wine collection is a huge investment, and you need to be sure about your decision as it would be a significant commitment but also quite a rewarding one. Of course, you also need to consider if the investment you’re making is both enjoyable and profitable. While doing your research, you should first ask yourself these questions before you start investing in fine wine.

    1. What Will I Buy?

    This is the first question that will come to your mind, and it will require the most amount of research since it has the greatest impact on how much you will spend building your collection. However, it is imperative that you are able to answer this question before venturing further into the world of wine.

    The first thing that you should look into is determining the type of wine you will buy. This is because wine investment aspects vary from one category to another, which would greatly impact your buying decision.

    If you are planning to invest in Bordeaux, for example, your most important concern would be which vintage to invest in and when. Bordeaux is a sucker for vintage-based wines, and you will have to consider which vintage you intend to buy. Generally, from 1961 to 1983 and from 2005 to 2009, the wines have been great, with 2018,2019 and 2020 most recently known as exceptional.

    2. What Is My Goal for Investing in Wine?

    Most of the time, people invest in fine wine to get rich. Some want to make money while others want to impress their friends with a huge collection as it is a status symbol. Some people buy wine as an investment, which can be profitable in the long run. In any case, you should find out why you want to buy wine before investing in it.

    If you want to make a profit, you should get tips from experts and invest in wines that are highly rated in wine auctions while keeping the price low. If you just want to have a huge collection, you can go for wines that are highly rated while still having a modest price.

    3. What Are My Resources?

    You wouldn’t want to put in money that you can’t spare. If you have more cash, you can invest in wines that are expensive. However, if you don’t have as much as you thought, you can look for wines that are cheaper. Remember that expensive wines do not always translate to better quality.

    When you know your resources, you can be more specific and narrow your options. For example, if you have a large budget, you can invest in rare wines that are expensive and demand a high price.

     4. What Is the Wine Market Like?

    While you’re at it, you should also try finding out if the wine market is currently good or bad. This would be a good starting point to find out if you should invest in wine or not.

    If the market is considered to be good, it means that the wine industry is booming, and it would be a good time for you to create your collection. 

     5. What Is My Target for My Investment? 

    You need to know how much you are planning to make from your wine investment. If you want to make a lot, you have to choose wines that are expensive. Those that have considerable potential for high profit are European wines from a good vintage and from a top vineyard.

    You should also consider wine investments in the US which are rare and valuable. If you want to make a modest profit, you can look up wines that are cheaper and still have a good potential for profit.

    6. Where Will I Keep My Collection? 

    This may not be a big deal for some people, but it is a big deal for some. You will have to consider if you have room for a vast collection as well as whether you can maintain it.

    If you can’t keep your collection, you need to find another place to keep it. You can keep it in your wine storage, or you can hire a specialised company like Cru Wine that would take care of your collection. If you already have a collection, you may also consider adding to it as you will be confident that you can take good care of it.

     7. What Is My Plan? 

    When you know your goals and resources, the next thing is to find out how you are going to execute your investment plan. It is important that you have a plan or a strategy on how you will run your collection.

    For example, if your goal is to make a profit, you should have a game plan on how you will sell the wines that you acquire. It is important that you have your plan ready because it would make the process a lot easier and will give you a more confident approach.

     8. Is the Timing Right?

    It is important that you also determine the best time to invest in wine. This is because the wine market is volatile, and you need to be able to predict how it will move. You should also find out if the market is in a good or bad state to avoid the risk of investing at the wrong time.

     9. Do I Need a Specialist?

    If you plan to invest in fine wine, it is always a good idea to hire a specialist to take care of everything for you.

    However, it’s also important to note that not every wine investment specialist is good for your needs. It would be best if you’re able to find someone who has in-depth knowledge about wine and is able to give you excellent advice. But if you cannot find anyone like this, you can look up to an expert specialising in wine investment.

    In fact, it would be best if you could find an expert to not just handle your wine investments but also to handle the entire wine collection. Expert wine collectors are not easy to find, but they are worth the effort.

    10. Will I Enjoy Collecting Wines? 

    Last but not least, you should also find out if you’ll enjoy the process of collecting fine wines. It’s important that you are able to see yourself enjoying the whole process. This is because it would be very hard to see your investment as an obligation, and it would only create stress. You need to be happy with the wine that you buy and the fact that you own it. You should be able to see the joy of having an investment that is always by your side in this process.

    Wine Collecting: The Investment of a Lifetime 

    For people who can’t tell the difference between a Pinot Noir and a Merlot, investing in fine wine may sound fun, but it can actually be quite a stressful task. However, if you have the right information, you can make a more informed decision about buying wine for investment.

    Investing in fine wine is one of the most rewarding investments you can have. But it pays to work with someone who shares the same level of passion for wine as you do. This is where Cru Wine excels. Our team of wine specialists are here to enrich the fine wine investing, collecting, curating, and drinking experience of every wine lover out there. Whether you want our expert advice or someone to manage your cellar, we are the ones you can rely on. Sign up to our mailing list today to receive exclusive access to the world’s greatest fine wines and spirits.

    The post Ask Yourself These 10 Questions Before Investing in Fine Wine appeared first on Cru Wine Fine Wine & Spirits Shop.

Wine blogs

Wine Blogs

04 July 2022

Wine Blogs Wine Blogs
  • Red, White, and American
    04 July 2022
    Happy 4th of July! As you gather with friends and family, celebrate the freedoms that we hold so dear today, and, raise a glass. From sparkling to still, red to white, now is the time to enjoy something refreshing and lively, like one of these beauties from the good ‘ole USA. As it is so […]
  • Concrete solution just another chapter in the evolution of Niagara’s Hidden Bench
    04 July 2022

    By Rick VanSickle

    This quote from Hidden Bench Estate Winery vigneron/proprietor Harald Thiel is everything: “We can’t just sit here and not evolve.”

    I love it because it’s absolutely true. You must move forward to actually move forward; you must push the boundaries beyond what you are comfortable with; and you must invest in people, technology, and viticulture, especially at the level of Hidden Bench, a benchmark winery for terroir-driven, estate-grown wines crafted from certified organic grapes using sustainable, non-interventionist winemaking techniques.

    Thiel, above, and his team were busy during COVID, constructing a new crush facility and barrel cellar, below, that now includes 60 tonnes of 45hl and 26hl concrete fermenters (seven in total) to add a new dimension to the already stacked lineup at the estate. The concrete tanks are being utilized for some of the estate Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc, Gamay, and unoaked Chardonnay.

    “The goal is to make a Chablis style Chardonnay,” said Thiel. During a trip to the Burgundy region a few years ago, Thiel had an epiphany of sorts while visiting top producers. In Chablis they leave their wines on the lees from 18 to 24 months and eschew the use of oak. “If we are going to do this we have to invest,” Thiel said. “I was looking for exceptional results.”

    The 2021 vintage will be the first concrete fermented and aged Chardonnay to be released, but it’s a couple of years away. “It (concrete aging) creates beautiful weight on the mid-palate,” said Thiel. For now, concrete has found its way into two or three of the wines reviewed below, including the new Sauvignon Blanc Béton Rosomel Vineyard 2021, a companion for the Fumé Blanc and Nuit Blanche SBs already produced at the estate.

    The other big change coming out of COVID for Hidden Bench was winemaker Jay Johnston leaving the estate to join the Tawse team as an assistant winemaker following the death of his close friend, winemaker Paul Pender. Assistant winemaker Alex Baines was quickly elevated to head winemaker at Hidden Bench.

    Baines, above, joined Hidden Bench in 2017 after completing the winemaking and viticulture program at Niagara College. Originally from Finchingfield in Essex County, England, he has 10 vintages experience at premium producers in California, New Zealand, Australia, and Canada. Baines has a keen interest in organic and biodynamic viniculture and above all, the attention to detail required to craft top-notch low-intervention wines.

    Baines was named as the recipient for the inaugural Paul Pender Memorial ‘Rising Star’ award at the recent Ontario Wine Awards.

    Pender, who died tragically at his cottage last February, was named the Winemaker of the Year at the same awards ceremony. OPP have charged a Hamilton man with second-degree murder in connection with Pender’s death.

    Baines worked a harvest at Tawse in 2012 after two years in Australia. “When I arrived at Tawse for harvest, my plan was to be in Ontario for three months and then travel Canada for the rest of my one-year visa,” said Baines. “Quite quickly, after working with Paul and the team, I realized that this job wasn’t just a means to travel but an industry that I wanted to pursue a career in.” Pender suggested the Niagara College program to Baines and wrote a letter of recommendation.

     “I learned from Paul how important a sense of place was in winemaking and that the best wines were those that truly transported you to a location, a place in time and made you reflect on what you were doing the year the fruit was harvested,” said Baines. “He really inspired me to follow organic farming practices and terroir-focused winemaking. This philosophy still holds true today and I have focused my career on producers that follow these practices. I am very lucky to have found a home at Hidden Bench.”

    I tasted the current Hidden Bench portfolio with Thiel and Baines recently. Here is what I liked.

    Hidden Bench only crafts 100% estate grown wines in three series: the Estate Series which are blends of all three estate vineyards, the Terroir Series, which are single vineyard and/or barrel selection, limited production wines, and the Rachis & Derma series which represents the estate’s natural wine offerings. All grapes are biodynamically grown and certified organic and the majority of wines are bottled unfined and unfiltered. Wines are now available at the winery unless otherwise noted.

    The Bubble

    Hidden Bench Natur Zero Dosage 2016 ($42, 93 points) — This “zero dosage” (no sugar added) traditional method sparkling wine spent five years on its lees before being disgorged in January of this year. It’s a blend of 72% Pinot Noir and 28% Chardonnay from the estate vineyards and spends 6 months in 100% French oak, all neutral barriques. It pours an elegant, persistent mousse and has a complex toasty/biscuity/brioche first impression with lemon, grapefruit, pear, raspberry bramble, a touch of flint and toasted almonds with subtle autolytic notes. It has energy and verve on the palate with green apple, lemon curd and pear in a rich and suave style that combines length and elegance through a lifted finish. A fabulous sparkling wine.

    The Whites

    Hidden Bench Roman’s Block Riesling Rosomel Vineyard 2018 ($32, 93 points) — The Roman’s Block Riesling from the venerable 40-year-old Rosomel Vineyard planted by Roman Prydatkewycz is consistently among the best Rieslings produced not only in Niagara, but in the entire country. Because of the age of the vines, the yields are only about two tonnes per acre. It’s a minerally-driven Riesling with fresh squeezed lime, wet stones, touch of peach skin and a lovely floral note on the nose. It’s electric on the palate with sharp lime and citrus, chalky/stony notes, a touch of honey and beeswax and a big, juicy, and lifted finish. Such a classy Riesling that will improve for 5+ years in the cellar.

    Hidden Bench Felseck Riesling 2018 ($30, 92 points) — The final blend for the Felseck Riesling comes from a small one-acre parcel on the southernmost point of the vineyard, planted in 1999. It’s a touch shier on the nose than the Rosomel but opens up to apple blossoms, zesty lemon and integrated stony minerality. There’s a touch more honey on the palate and fleshier with lemons, peach, minerality and a vibrant, finessed finish. Can also cellar 5+ years.

    Hidden Bench Téte de Cuvée Chardonnay 2019 ($48, Sept. 1 release, 94 points) — The Téte de Cuvée is a barrel selection from the three estate vineyards to showcase the Beamsville Bench terroir. As it turns out, the 2019 vintage is all from the Rosomel Vineyard, planted in 1976. The oak regime is 100% French with 17% new, 35% second fill and the balance neutral wood for 14 months. The wine is bottled unfined and unfiltered. It has an intense nose of lemon curd, ripe pear, bergamot, golden apple, creamy notes, flinty minerality and elegant spice. It has weight and richness on the palate with a complex array of pear/quince, flint, lemon zest, a creamy texture, integrated spice notes and a beautifully finessed finish. A showcase Chard for the appellation. Bravo!

    Hidden Bench Felseck Vineyard Chardonnay 2019 ($45, September release, 93 points) — The Felseck is made similarly to the Rosomel with just a little more new oak (27%) and is also bottled unfined and unfiltered. It’s a touch more subtle on the nose and more minerally driven with lightly toasted almonds, golden apple, citrus, lemon blossoms, ripe pear, and spice notes. It’s pure elegance on the palate with a rich and creamy entry then baked pear, apple, lovely citrus zest, flinty/toasty notes, beautifully integrated spice, and a long, finessed finish. Very fine Chard.

    Hidden Bench Estate Chardonnay 2020 ($32, Vintages Essential, 92 points) — A little different approach for this perennial favourite as a Vintages Essential. It’s a blend of the three estate vineyards and is crafted using a blend of concrete (6.5%), French oak barriques (24% new) and French oak puncheons for nine months. It’s more open knit on the nose than the two Chardonnays above with overt notes of peach, pear, nectarine, lemon zest and spicy apple pie. The spice shines on the palate with ripe stone fruits in a dense and concentrated attack that finds harmony from the racy acidity. It has good length and finesse on the finish. Drinking great right now.

    Hidden Bench Fumé Blanc Rosomel Vineyard 2020 ($32, 92 points) — This single-vineyard Sauvignon Blanc is aged in 100% French oak (11% new). It has an interesting nose of grapefruit, gooseberries, fresh herbs, star fruit and lovely integrated spice. It’s more concentrated on the palate with a creamy texture in support of the grapefruit, pear, bergamot, herbs, flinty minerality and spice with a solid acid backbone and fresh finish.

    Hidden Bench Sauvignon Blanc Béton Rosomel Vineyard 2021 ($28, 93 points) — Here’s a first look at a wine aged in the new concrete tanks purchased by Hidden Bench and a chance to taste a wood aged Sauvignon Blanc beside a concrete version. Aging in concrete was for seven months. An interesting and different nose of grapefruit, pear, some tropical notes, grass, and herbs with flinty minerality. It has gorgeous texture and a rich, deep feel on the palate with ripe pear, grapefruit, subtle spice notes, lime zest and a long, fresh finish. Love it!

    The Rosés

    Hidden Bench Locust Lane Rosé 2021 ($25, Vintages now, 93 points) — The blend for this primarily “direct to press” rosé is 92% Pinot Noir, 5% Viognier and the rest Chardonnay. It has a fresh and saline nose with tart red berries, stone fruits, herbs, and cream. It has lovely texture, dry and vibrant, with tangy red berries, touch of earthy/savoury notes and a perky, lively finish bolstered by mouth-watering acidity.

    Hidden Bench Nocturn Rosé 2021 ($25, 91 points) — Nocturn is a saignee style rosé from a blend of 75% Pinot Noir, 11% Merlot, 9% Malbec and 5% Cabernet Franc that is aged in neutral oak for five months. It shows a brighter pink colour in the glass than the Locust Lane with a meatier nose of ripe raspberries, cherries, and a touch of cassis. It’s bold and rich (for a rosé) on the palate with ripe red berries, citrus zest, and vibrancy on the finish. A perfectly dry and more upfront rosé.

    Rachis and Derma Chantilly Rosé 2021 ($30, 90 points) — This fun wine is made from 100% Pinot Noir and is bottled on the lees in the ancestral method (second fermentation in the bottle to give it fizz) and is bone-dry with only a minimal about of sulphur added at bottling. It shows subtle effervescence in the glass and has a tangy nose of brambly red berries, rhubarb pie and watermelon in a clean and refreshing style. It’s laden in red berries on the palate, but super-dry and bursting with flavours through the bright finish. Just a unique and fun sparkling wine.

    The Reds

    Hidden Bench Rosomel Vineyard Pinot Noir 2019 ($58, 92 points) — This single-vineyard Pinot is aged in 100% French oak (14% new) for 10 months. It’s bottled unfined and unfiltered. It has a complex and interesting nose of wild raspberries, dark cherries, subtle cassis, baking spices, integrated herbs, earth, and violets. It’s textured and lively on the palate with smooth tannins then sour cherries, cassis, earth/savoury notes, spice, and gorgeous, uplifting finesse on the finish. Will reward with time in the cellar, say 5+ years.

     Hidden Bench Felseck Vineyard Pinot Noir 2019 ($48, 93 points) — The oak treatment is similar to the above Pinot and is also bottled unfined and unfiltered. It has an intense nose of earthy red berries, red currants, spice, and subtle earthy/savoury perfume. It has a silky texture and richness on the palate with brambly raspberries, cherry tart, cassis, touch of anise and graphite with a spicy edge and a juicy, finessed finish. Good future ahead for this beauty. Cellar 6+ years.

    Rachis and Derma Gamay 2020 ($35, 90 points) — The Rachis & Derma label is reserved for Hidden Bench’s more radical line of natural wines. This Gamay, from a new estate vineyard in the Lincoln-Lakeshore appellation, spends six months in neutral oak and there are no additions of any kind, including sulphur, added to the wine. It has a jammy, super clean nose, with plums, black currants, kirsch, earth, raspberry puree, and pepper notes. The fine tannins add a bit structure to this wine on the palate with notes of raspberry patch, pepper, plums, and currants with a tangy, lifted finish. Thiel puts it succinctly: “It’s pretty %$*& tasty!”

    Hidden Bench Gamay Noir 2020 ($30, 92 points) — From the more traditional side of winemaking, this similarly sourced Gamay is aged in French oak (14% new) for nine months. The nose is quite plummy with dark cherries, violets, forest berries and integrated spice notes. It’s juicy and dense on the palate with some structure and tannins that showcase the dark cherries, black raspberries, earthy/savoury notes, and spice on a fresh, finessed finish.

    Hidden Bench Terroir Caché 2018 ($45, Sept. 1 release, 94 points) — The blend is 46% Merlot, 31% Malbec and 23% Cabernet Franc all sourced from the three estate vineyards on the Beamsville Bench. It’s aged in French oak (38% new) for 20 months. Such an enthralling nose of anise, cassis, blackberries and cherries with dried tobacco, earth, charred cedar, and rich spice notes. It’s smooth but has structure on the palate with super dense wild red berries, tobacco, leather, blackberries, earth, and elegant spice notes all leading to a mouth-watering and lifted finish. Such a beautiful red wine with style and power that will continue to get better for 7+ years in the cellar.

    The post Concrete solution just another chapter in the evolution of Niagara’s Hidden Bench appeared first on Wines In Niagara.

  • Thirty Bench Winemaker’s Rosé 2021
    04 July 2022

    $22.95VINTAGES#:27024

    Pale salmon in color with a mild nose. On the mid palate the wine displays some mild effervescent notes along with crisp dry acidity and a hint of zesty tartness. Lots of crisp minerality and strawberries coming through. There’ some unusual flavors that I couldn’t place, perhaps from the pinot meunier, the back of the bottle says it’s a blend of Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier and Gamay Noir. I would give it an 87-88, a nice crisp dry rose, but a little odd, and honestly, at this price you can do way better with a Provence rose. I only bought one, but would likely return it otherwise. We paired it with a cheddar and blue cheese burger and it went nicely.

    Product Details

    Thirty Bench is one of the most trusted producers in Niagara. This rosé has oodles of buoyant cherry, strawberry and watermelon alongside rhubarb and a touch of spice. Refreshing and zesty, it’s perfect for enlivening an outdoor brunch but also has the versatility, structure, and depth of character for dinnertime. Try it with grilled calamari, pizza, grilled salmon, sausages, or really whatever you’re having.

    More Details
    • Release DateJune 18, 2022
    • Alcohol/Vol 12%
    • Made In Ontario, Canada
    • By Thirty Bench
    • Sugar Content 4 g/L
    • Varietal Rosé

  • What We Have Been Drinking—7/4/2022
    04 July 2022
    Over the course of a week, I taste a bunch of wine, usually with friends, and almost always with my wife.  Here are some of the wines we tasted over the past few weeks. These are wines that were not sent as …
  • Exploring Alluvium Cellars, Woodinville’s Newest Boutique Winery
    04 July 2022

    Last Friday we made a trip to Woodinville’s Warehouse District at for the grand opening of Alluvium Cellars’ new tasting room. We were blown away! I will try not to spoil the entire experience for you here, and just leave you with a few of my favorite images. We were instantly impressed with the interior design and the friendly greeting we received the moment we walked in the door, and of course, the wine!

    Alluvium’s fabulous tasting room is located at The Junction in Woodinville’s Warehouse District, just around the corner from Armstrong Family Winery. They offer tasting flights, wines by the glass, and rotating beer/seltzer on tap. Curated light snacks are also available for purchase.

    This barrel room is also a functional and stylish tasting space!

    Check out these awesome tasting flight test tubes. For our tasting, the lineup included Apricity, a Rhone-inspired white blend featuring Viognier from Coyote Canyon Vineyard in the Horse Heaven Hills AVA, and Marsanne, Grenache Blanc, and Roussanne from Jamison Vineyard in the Candy Mountain AVA.

    Next, we sampled the 2021 Amar Rose, a blend of Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Syrah. This is a perfect crisp summer patio rose wine, with notes of strawberry and a hint of stone fruits. It is delicious.

    Very memorable and impressive was the 2019 Asterius, a single varietal Syrah with fruits from four different vineyards. It is balanced and drinks beautifully with notes of blueberry, blackberry, plum, and a hint of cinnamon. All three of us in our group raved over it, including Carrie, a hard sell on Syrah. With only 100 cases produced, those will sell out quickly.  Get some!

    Our tasting lineup concluded with the 2019 Alpha red blend. It’s made with53% Cabernet Sauvignon, 32% Cabernet Franc and 15% Malbec. It is a bold blend with notes of dark cherry, pepper, black currant, and tobacco leaves.

    The team was amazing and made the entire experience a joy. Pictured here are co-owner/winemaker Tyson Trautmann, co-owner/creative director, Brittany Trautmann, Tasting room manager, Jennifer Tucker, and Facilities Manager, Trevor Tucker. You will love them as much as we did!

    Alluvium Cellars is located at 19151 144th Avenue NE, Space J (near Clean Planet Car Wash), Woodinville, WA 98072.  They are (at the time this article was written) open on Fridays from 4-8pm, Saturdays from 2-8 pm, and Sundays from 2-6 pm. I really appreciate that they are staying open a bit later than what we typically find at tasting rooms in Woodinville, as it can be very tricky to get from the office to a tasting room on a work day!

    Cheers!

    ~ Jen Trovesi

     

    Resources:

    Alluvium Cellars Website

    Alluvium Cellars on Instagram

    Alluvium Cellars on Facebook

     

     

    The post Exploring Alluvium Cellars, Woodinville’s Newest Boutique Winery appeared first on Woodinville Wine Blog.

  • Laughing Stock Vineyards Acquires New Winemaker
    04 July 2022

    Laughing Stock Vineyards is excited to welcome Sandy Leier as their new Winemaker starting July 4, 2022.

    Read Laughing Stock Vineyards Acquires New Winemaker at MyVanCity

  • Wednesday Wine Reviews with @Sam_WineTeacher
    04 July 2022

    Wine Reviews June 28, 2022   2021 Rosé Fort Berens Lillooet, BC $21.99 This is a Pinot Noir dominant blend (79%), with small amounts of Merlot (13%), and Cabernet Franc (8%), all of which were estate grown.  Winemaker Alex Nel felt that the small additions helped to boost the colour and add a note of... Read more

    Read Wednesday Wine Reviews with @Sam_WineTeacher at MyVanCity

  • Fourth of July 2022
    04 July 2022
    Hi. This blog post is for subscribers only. To see what you’re missing, click here.
  • Pizzini Round up 2022 – Part 2!
    04 July 2022

    Pizzini produce some of Australia's best expressions of Italian grape varieties. Wine reviews by Lisa Johnston (thewinemuse).

    The post Pizzini Round up 2022 – Part 2! appeared first on winemusing.

  • Trinity Hill The Trinity Hawke’s Bay Red Blend 2021
    04 July 2022
    Trinity Hill The Trinity Hawke’s Bay Red Blend 2021 (ON $19.95)

    Trinity Hill The Trinity Hawke’s Bay Red Blend 2021

    This saucy blend of merlot, cabernet franc, cabernet sauvignon and petit verdot is inky and magenta-black as it pours. Then sink your schnozz deep into the glass, and inhale like the life of your lungs depends on it. It is SO delicious! Perfumed with bay leaf, tobacco, blackberry, and pepper, it’s a fabulously fleshy, muscular wine with juicy tannins, hints of soy and black olive on the finish, and slightly saline layers. Crafted by rock star duo Warren Gibson and Damian Fischer, it’s spectacular with minted lamb chops and spectacular value for money.

    Double Gold medal winner at the NZ International Wine Show.

    Rating:

    For more information about this wine: Trinity Hill Wines

    From Yvonne Lorkin’s post.

    This wine is available through select Ontario LCBO stores.  <MyWinePal: I am not sure if it is the 2021 vintage.>

    The post Trinity Hill The Trinity Hawke’s Bay Red Blend 2021 appeared first on MyWinePal.

Wine Podcasts

Wine Podcasts

04 July 2022

Wine Podcasts Wine Podcasts
  • Ep. 982 Cathy Hughye | Get US Market Ready With Italian Wine People
    04 July 2022
    Welcome to Episode 982 Steve Raye interviews Cathy Huyghe in this installment of Get US Market Ready With Italian Wine People on the Italian Wine Podcast. About today’s guest: Cathy Huyghe is an award-winning journalist and entrepreneur, and an engaging public speaker. She is the co-founder and CEO of Enolytics, a data-driven business intelligence provider to beverage alcohol companies around the world. She is a columnist for Forbes about the business and politics of the wine industry, and she writes for Inc about mindfulness practices for entrepreneurs particularly in the hospitality industry. She is a featured commentator for the “Reign of Terroir” episode in the Netflix series Rotten, which has been nominated for an Emmy award. Enolytics is a featured protagonist in a Harvard Business School case study in business analytics. Huyghe has been practicing yoga for two decades and meditation for the past eight years. She studied meditation with Tara Brach and Jack Kornfield and earned their teacher certification, and she is also certified to teach hatha yoga in the lineage of Kashi urban ashram in Atlanta. She founded Writing for Seva as a service project, which led directly to co-creating content for A Balanced Glass, an award-winning community that raises awareness for wellness and mental health in the wine industry. You can find out more about this guest by visiting: Contact Information: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. More about the host Steve Raye: Steve Raye of Bevology Inc originally joined our weekly lineup with narrations from his book “How to get US Market Ready” - but everyone just loved him so much, we brought him back with this series of interviews that informs and inspires! Each week he speaks to industry professionals; guests who have gained valuable experience in the Italian wine sector and have insightful tips and stories that can help anyone who wants to learn about getting US Market Ready! For more information on the host Steve Raye you can check out his website, Bevology Inc. here: www.bevologyinc.com/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!
  • C is for Carignane on Winephabet Street
    04 July 2022

    It’s Monday, Let’s raise a glass to the beginning of another week. It’s time to unscrew, uncork or saber a bottle and let’s begin Exploring the Wine Glass! Today, we return to Winephabet Street where the letter of the day is C and it stands for Carignane.  

    We had the pleasure of having special guests Tana Cole and Greg Burns of Jessie’s Grove Winery in Lodi, California. Greg’s family has owned the vineyards for Jessie’s Grove since 1862! They are the owners of the Bechtold vineyard - ancient vines Cinsault and their Carignane vineyard has vines that are 120 years old.

    I’d like to give a shoutout to Michael Kelly for the introduction. So sit back and enjoy the conversation. It is a great one! 

    While you are listening, please take a moment to rate and review Exploring the Wine Glass. Ratings are now available, on Apple Podcasts, Spotify and Audible! Taking one minute of your time is the only way the algorithms will suggest Exploring the Wine Glass to others.  Slainte!

    Music: WINE by Kēvens Official Video

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    Thoughts or comments? Contact Lori at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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    Find us on Twitter, Instagram , Pinterest, and Snapchat (@dracaenawines)

    Want to watch some pretty cool livestream events and wine related videos. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel

    Find out more about us and our award winning Paso Robles wines on our website

    Looking for some interesting recipes and wine pairings? Then head over to our wine pairing website

    Thanks for listening and remember to always PURSUE YOUR PASSION!

    Sláinte! 

    Please support our sponsor

    Dracaena Wines - Our Wines + Your Moments + Great Memories Use code 'Explore' at checkout to receive 10% off your first order

  • Pairing Wine with Barbecue (Pairing wine with Kansas City Barbecue, Memphis Barbecue, Carolina Barbecue, and Texas Barbecue, tasting and review of Lambrusco, Tempranillo, and Sangiovese)
    03 July 2022

    Wines and barbecue make a perfect pairing, but depending on the type of barbecue you like - Kansas City barbecue or Memphis barbecue or Carolina barbecue or Texas barbecue - there are different types of wines that will definitely pair better. Intimidated?!? Don’t be! We got you covered! In this episode, we discuss different types of barbecue styles and wines that should go well with them. And we taste and review three different styles of red wine that are great fits. One is a fizzy, frothy, and fun Lambrusco, another is a rich and deep Tempranillo, and a third is a balanced and flexible Sangiovese. Listen to learn more about what we think of these wines, and how to make a perfect wine pairing at your next barbecue. Wines reviewed in this episode: Lini 910 Labrusca Rosso Lambrusco, 2016 Pico Cuadro Ribera del Duero Tempranillo, and 2020 Podere La Berta Sangiovese Superiore.

  • Episode 313 - International Wines Cali Style
    03 July 2022

    Pedroncelli Alto Vineyards Sangiovese

    Matchbook Wines Tinto Rey Tempranillo

    In this episode, Rob, Scott, and Becky ask a question, can California make (good) wines from international varietals? To find out they review the classically Italian Sangiovese from Pedroncelli, and the revered Spanish Tempranillo from Matchbook Winery and their Tinto Rey.  Will these wines prove what Cali can do, or does it prove what they shouldn't do?  We shall see...on The Wine Vault.

  • Ep. 981 Natasha Sumkina | Uncorked
    03 July 2022
    Welcome to episode 981 in which host Polly Hammond interviews Natasha Sumkina, this week on Uncorked. This week, we welcome Natasha Sumkina, a St Petersburg native who is spearheading Russian-language wine communications for the GenZ and Millennial markets. Join us as we explore trends in education vs entertainment, social media and socialising, and how we may need to rethink what we think about Russian wine consumers. More about today’s guest: Natasha Sumkina is a wine communicator and educator working specifically with the Russian-speaking markets. She lives in London, where she is presently working on her WSET diploma; she is the founder of MonaVina, a St Petersburg-based wine club for GenZ and Millenials; and she passed her pandemic months working in wine importation, bringing over 40 wines to the Russian market. Her latest endeavour? Launching a Russian-language podcast to help her peers fall in love with wine, too. To learn more visit: Insta: https://www.instagram.com/wine_by_glass/ More about the host Polly Hammond: Polly is Founder and CEO of 5forests. She splits her time between Barcelona, Auckland, and Napa, consulting, writing, and speaking about the trends that impact today’s wine businesses. She’s an advisor to New Zealand Trade & Enterprise, host of Uncorked with the Italian Wine Podcast, cohost of the Real Business of Wine with Robert Joseph, and, occasionally, a knitter. Polly is a graduate of the University of Southern California, where she earned degrees in International Relations and French. Those studies led to a deep and abiding love affair with behavioral Economics, and her wine work is based on insights into all the crazy and irrational reasons consumers engage with brands. With over 20 years experience in growing successful companies, Polly knows first hand the challenges faced by independent businesses. She approaches each client experience with empathy and understanding for what it takes to adapt and thrive in the real world. To learn more about Polly Hammond visit: Twitter: @mme_hammond Instagram: @5forests website: https://5forests.com/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!
  • AliciaSylvester
    02 July 2022

    I think of Alicia Sylvester as a shooting star because, to me, she appears to be speeding through life...even when she's standing still; when she can stand still. Her passion is invigorating. Her energy is inspiring. And at times you could even say she glows.

    This podcast can serve as a sort of Master Class on how to rise through the ranks. You'll get a kick out of how this small town central Cali girl ended up working harvests across the globe, playing a role in winemaking with respected brands, then landing her current gig at Banshee Wines. Alicia Sylvester crafts small vineyard designate wines for their club, and up to 70,000 cases wholesale. Any aspiring young winemaker should take notes!

  • Ep. 980 Giacomo Neri Pt. 2 | On The Road Edition
    02 July 2022
    Welcome to episode 980, another installment of 'On The Road Edition', hosted by Stevie Kim. Today she continues her visit to the beautiful, family-run Winery, Casanova di Neri in Montalcino, Tuscany, tasting wines with owner Giacomo Neri - listen in as they talk about the winemaking, the labels, the terroir as well as their recent 50th-anniversary celebrations! This is a 2-part interview. Today's interview is Part 2 of 2 More about Casanova di Neri Winery: "We were amazed when we discovered that the letters of CASANOVA DI NERI, the name Giovanni Neri gave the company in 1971, could be rearranged to form a number of Italian sentences that embody some of our deepest held beliefs about wine and winemaking. Could these be ‘messages in a bottle’, sent by our nonno to guide us even when he was no longer around? We’ll never know, but it’s a nice thought! Here, then, is our winemaking credo, summed up in seven anagrams. We believe that success is all about playing the long game. The company founder, Giovanni Neri, was a visionary who understood, well before it became a dogma, that planting the right grapes in the right vineyards was the key to creating great Brunellos. We have continued his legacy, fully aware that the decisions we make today will have an impact on our grandchildren and their grandchildren." Find out more about the winery by visiting: https://www.casanovadineri.wine/en/586/casanova-di-neri More about the host Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!
  • Ep. 978 Map 15 California | Jumbo Shrimp Maps
    02 July 2022
    Welcome to Episode 978 The Jumbo Shrimp Maps Series. Today we are going to talk about Map 15, talking about California. Today's Map is presented by Erin DeMara. About the Series: We have specially created this free content for all our listeners who are studying for wine exams. Since Stevie Kim discovered Rosie Baker’s hand drawn maps on Instagram, our in house editorial and graphics team has been working on this project, and now the maps are available to purchase in Beta form, while they undergo the final proofing and editing by our Expert Advisory Board. It’s a 3 layered project, because we know everyone learns differently. We now offer the complete box set of 39 maps, this series of podcasts with the maps narrated by our crack team of wine educators, and finally the Study Guide Book which will be publish later this year. Our map project is in no way a substitute for the material set out by other educational organisations, but we hope all the Wine Students out there will find our map project a new, exciting and useful tool for learning. To purchase the Beta version box set of maps, please visit mammajumboshrimp.com To find out more about Mamma Jumbo Shrimp and how to buy the Maps visit: www.mammajumboshrimp.com More about the Erin DeMara: Erin DeMara is a twenty-nine-year professional of the wine and restaurant industries. Currently in his seventh year with 1821 Fine Wine and Spirits, an Italian-focused importer, he manages the portfolio of 100+ wines and spirits within Florida, USA. Erin is a Certified Wine Educator by the Society of Wine Educators and an Italian Wine Ambassador and Educator by VinItaly International Academy – the only wine professional in America to hold both titles. He is also a Certified Spirits Specialist, a Certified Sommelier by the Court of Master Sommeliers, and an awarded member of the Guild of Sommeliers If you want to learn more visit: Website www.1821fws.com Instagram wineknowfl Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!
  • Ep. 979 Map 16 Canada | Jumbo Shrimp Maps
    02 July 2022
    Welcome to Episode 979 The Jumbo Shrimp Maps Series. Today we are going to talk about Map 16, talking about Canada. Today's Map is presented by Peggy Baudon. About the Series: We have specially created this free content for all our listeners who are studying for wine exams. Since Stevie Kim discovered Rosie Baker’s hand drawn maps on Instagram, our in house editorial and graphics team has been working on this project, and now the maps are available to purchase in Beta form, while they undergo the final proofing and editing by our Expert Advisory Board. It’s a 3 layered project, because we know everyone learns differently. We now offer the complete box set of 39 maps, this series of podcasts with the maps narrated by our crack team of wine educators, and finally the Study Guide Book which will be publish later this year. Our map project is in no way a substitute for the material set out by other educational organisations, but we hope all the Wine Students out there will find our map project a new, exciting and useful tool for learning. To purchase the Beta version box set of maps, please visit mammajumboshrimp.com To find out more about Mamma Jumbo Shrimp and how to buy the Maps visit: www.mammajumboshrimp.com More about Peggy Baudon: "I am relatively new to wine, having stumbled into it by default. I recently returned to bartending after a stretch of years teaching then followed by having two children. Bartending in the food/wine industry offered the chance to re-enter the work world in the evenings while allowing time to be with children in the day. The opportunity to work with wine again sparked a curiosity and an itch to learn more and more about it. Although I intended bartending to be a stop-gap measure of a job until I could return to full-time classroom teaching, the realization occurred that the food and wine industry is a pursuit where complete satisfaction could be gained by pouring wine and making people incredibly happy. Thoughts of starting to build a new career in wine began to percolate. When people look back on their lives, one common regret is not having done the things we wish we had. And with a window of a handful of years until I had planned to return to the teaching profession, the decision to change course and take a leap into the wine world was joyfully made.” If you want to learn more visit: linkedin.com/in/peggy-baudon-dipwset-b6aa84199 Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!
  • Ep. 977 Map 14 USA | Jumbo Shrimp Maps
    02 July 2022
    Welcome to Episode 977 The Jumbo Shrimp Maps Series. Today we are going to talk about Map 14, talking about the USA. Today's Map is presented by Erin DeMara. About the Series: We have specially created this free content for all our listeners who are studying for wine exams. Since Stevie Kim discovered Rosie Baker’s hand drawn maps on Instagram, our in house editorial and graphics team has been working on this project, and now the maps are available to purchase in Beta form, while they undergo the final proofing and editing by our Expert Advisory Board. It’s a 3 layered project, because we know everyone learns differently. We now offer the complete box set of 39 maps, this series of podcasts with the maps narrated by our crack team of wine educators, and finally the Study Guide Book which will be publish later this year. Our map project is in no way a substitute for the material set out by other educational organisations, but we hope all the Wine Students out there will find our map project a new, exciting and useful tool for learning. To purchase the Beta version box set of maps, please visit mammajumboshrimp.com To find out more about Mamma Jumbo Shrimp and how to buy the Maps visit: www.mammajumboshrimp.com More about the Erin DeMara: Erin DeMara is a twenty-nine-year professional of the wine and restaurant industries. Currently in his seventh year with 1821 Fine Wine and Spirits, an Italian-focused importer, he manages the portfolio of 100+ wines and spirits within Florida, USA. Erin is a Certified Wine Educator by the Society of Wine Educators and an Italian Wine Ambassador and Educator by VinItaly International Academy – the only wine professional in America to hold both titles. He is also a Certified Spirits Specialist, a Certified Sommelier by the Court of Master Sommeliers, and an awarded member of the Guild of Sommeliers If you want to learn more visit: Website www.1821fws.com Instagram wineknowfl Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!
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