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Australian Wine Blogs

Australian Wine Blogs

04 December 2022

Australian Wine Blogs Australian Wine Blogs
  • Thibaud Boudignon Rosé de Loire
    04 December 2022

     Rosé does not make it often on lists of serious high quality wines, but the 2020 Thibaud Boudignon Rosé de Loire should be there. It stood out in a recent tasting of about 30 Rosés.


    The grape composition is not entirely clear, but it is roughly 90% Cabernet Franc and 10% of a white wine variety, either Chenin Blanc or Grolleau. The regime is biodynamic. The wine is directly pressed and vinified like a white wine, with indigenous yeast.

    This wine has a light apricot orange colour, not as pale as Rosés from Provence. The flavours are apricot and yellow peach. This is a bone dry wine of great purity. It is flavoursome, quite linear with a firm structure and a long finish.

    Score: 92/+++ 


  • Ruggabellus Archaeus
    02 December 2022

     When Ruggabellus arrived on the scene, it created quite a stir. Abel Gibson picked the Rhone varieties much earlier than anybody else and used 100% whole-bunch on Shiraz. Lately it has been quieter other than the announcement he is going back to cork.

    The other development is that from the early concept of only making GSM blends of different proportions for the premium wines, he added a 100% Shiraz. This is actually similar to Peter Schell of Spinifex, the master blender of the Barossa, who finally added 100% Shiraz as an ultra premium wine.


    So this is the 100% Shiraz from the Eden Valley, the 2018 Ruggabellus Archaeus. I reviewed this wine about 20 months ago, and found it a bit unbalanced. Time to have another look.

    The flavours are of red cherry and pomegranate, quite fresh. Herbal notes and firm acidity are quite prominent as well. This time, the wine is  a bit more rounded than 20 months ago, but I find it a bit medicinal on the finish.

    Score: 93/+


  • Zema’s bargain 2018 shiraz + 10 more wines that made it in November
    02 December 2022

    Hot on the heels of this month’s Almost Club (highlighting wines that didn’t make the silver medal standard), here is a selection of ten wines that DID make it (if only just).

    As a warm-up, Zema’s Shiraz 2018 below is the sort of wine that I’m happy to shout from the rooftop – honest red wine at a super price.

    (more…)

    The post Zema’s bargain 2018 shiraz + 10 more wines that made it in November appeared first on Australian Wine Review.

  • Washington Lane Wines: Uniquely crafted for enjoyment
    01 December 2022

    As you peer across the orange orchard, the heat radiating off the reddish brown soil, the rows of trees seem to blend into lanes. Lanes and lanes of Washington navel trees glisten in the warm Australian sun. Find your Washington Lane with this delicious Langhorne Creek Shiraz, uniquely crafted for your enjoyment. It is vibrant […]

    The post Washington Lane Wines: Uniquely crafted for enjoyment appeared first on All About Australian Wines & Wineries | Just Wine Blog.

  • Kick Off Summer In Style At Wine Island Canberra
    01 December 2022
    Soak up the island vibe as you enjoy a drop in the capital.

    Kick off summer in style at Wine Island, Canberra. From Friday, December 2, to Saturday, December 3, Queen Elizabeth II Island (previously known as Aspen Island) on Lake Burley Griffin will be transformed into a wine lover’s paradise.

    The island’s iconic Carillon will be surrounded by cellar door experiences presented by winemakers from the Hunter Valley, McLaren Vale, King Valley, Coonawarra, Alpine Valley, Clare Valley, Orange and Canowindra.

    Canberra winemakers will be well represented too, with Mount Majura Vineyard, Contentious Character, Sholto Wines and Lark Hill all participating, alongside local brewery, BentSpoke, and local distiller, Big River.

    Gourmet food will be available from Olleyville by Create (cheese and charcuterie platters, tacos, dessert), Grease Monkey (burgers) and Olive at Hawker (Mediterranean).

    Dip your toes in the sand at the Greek Beach Club.

    If you’re dreaming of an overseas escape, dip your toes in the sand at the Greek Beach Club featuring wine, beer and ouzo from Drink Greek, then dance it all off with DJ Charlie Villas who will set the paradise vibes high. There’ll be a tropical vibe to the whole occasion with guests encouraged to wear tropical dress.

    Wine Selectors will present its very popular wine education masterclasses, where you can pit your inner vino detective against other guests to reveal mystery wines with clues from the professionals. Sessions include Pop ‘n’ Pink (Sparkling White, Sparkling Rosé, Rosé); Battles of the Whites (3 white varietals); Masked Reds (3 red varietals); and Sip ‘n’ Tell (2 white varietals, 1 red varietal).

    If you fancy yourself as an artist, there’ll be Pinot & Picasso classes so that you can create your own painting with guidance from a professional. Discover more about Canberra’s Big River Distilling Co at their gin classes or stretch it out with Yoga + Unwined on the beach.

    Wine Island aims to deliver a first-class experience, free from crowds with a very limited number of spots available for each session so that guests can take their time interacting with winemakers. Relaxed seating areas will provide deluxe spaces for everyone to ‘drink in’ the festival atmosphere.

    Ticket information: www.frontiertouring.com

    The post Kick Off Summer In Style At Wine Island Canberra appeared first on Food Wine Travel.

  • Welcome to the future of wine with the Giesen Pure Light Sauvignon Blanc 2022
    01 December 2022

    It’s easy to think that everyone is entranced by terroir, dreams about Burgundy and knows that Montalcino and Montepulciano involve different grapes. Yet the sheer reality is that most people just want a nice thing to drink at night in front of the tele. And the other reality is that more and more consumers are conscious of how much they drink, and would prefer if their favourite alcoholic beverage had a lower ABV.

    Enter wines like this Giesen Pure Light Sauvignon Blanc 2022.

    (more…)

    The post Welcome to the future of wine with the Giesen Pure Light Sauvignon Blanc 2022 appeared first on Australian Wine Review.

  • Thorn-Clarke Wines Cabernet Sauvignon 2018
    01 December 2022
    Wine details
    • Winery: Thorn-Clarke Wines
    • Wine Region: Eden Valley, South Australia
    • Variety: Cabernet Sauvignon
    • Vintage: 2018
    • Price: $70
    • Find it: From the winery direct
    • Alcohol content: 14.5%
    Tasting notes
    • You’ll like this if: You want something special
    • Body: Full
    • Mouthfeel: Rounded
    • Taste: Complex, elegant, powerful
    • Flavours: Blackcurrant, violet, spice
    Pairings
    • Enjoy it with: Someone special
    • Food pairings: Roast or braised meat
    Wine review: Thorn-Clarke Wines Cabernet Sauvignon 2018

    I tried Thorn-Clarke Wines for the first time when we went to the Barossa Valley, and I absolutely loved their wines. They have such a great range across varieties and price points so there is something for everyone. When I tried the Thorn-Clarke Wines Cabernet Sauvignon 2018 at the cellar door, I was absolutely blown away by it. It had to be up there as my favourite wine of the tasting, but also one of my favourite cabernet sauvignons of the trip! So I was excited to receive a sample of the wine to share with you all.

    The Thorn-Clarke Wines Cabernet Sauvignon 2018 is a seriously special Cabernet that shows the diversity that the Barossa and Eden Valley can deliver. On the nose, there are notes of blackcurrant and violet. The palate has a lovely complexity to it with blackcurrant and plum notes that are balanced by lovely spice. The wine has a lovely play between being boldly powerful yet refined, elegant and beautifully balanced.

    This wine would make a great gift for the special someone in your life, or enjoyed with a good meal. It would also be a great one to put away for a few years to age and allow the flavours to continue to develop. If you can wait that long!

    About Thorn-Clarke Wines

    The Clarke family settled in the Barossa in the 1870s. One side settled on a fruit farm, the other discovered the region’s first gold mine. 100 years later the two sides came together to produce wines worthy of gold.

    In 1987, David and Cheryl Clarke bought their first property near Tanunda and started to plant vines and the family tended to them by hand. Cheryl took charge and called in her family of the Thorns to help bring the vineyard into premium condition. The first vintage was in 1998 with small batches of Shiraz, and their story began. From there, they have expanded their selection of family-grown wines across a range of varieties produced sustainably.

    The William Randell range of wines honours their family ancestor William Richard Randell. The wines in this range are sourced only from grapes grown in their estate vineyards and only made in exceptional vintages.

    You can find out more about this wine at the Thorn-Clarke website.

    Note: This wine was sent as a sample. I was under no obligation to post about it. 

    The post Thorn-Clarke Wines Cabernet Sauvignon 2018 appeared first on The Cheeky Vino wine blog.

  • Henschke Henry’s Seven
    30 November 2022

    Who makes it? Henry’s Seven is one of Henschke’s vibrant red blends. The Henschke family is part of Australia’s First Families of Wine initiative and have a long history of winemaking in Australia. The family is also known as being one of the early champions of sustainablevineyard practices.In particular, biodynamic and organic principles. Henry’s Seven is another of Henschke’s […]

    The post Henschke Henry’s Seven appeared first on winemusing.

  • 5 wines perfect for Christmas from Grays
    30 November 2022

    With December coming up fast, Christmas and the holidays will be here before we know it. Whether you celebrate Christmas or are taking time off during the holidays, this time of year has a special feel to it. For me, this time of year is always about enjoying time with friends and family. And our celebrations always include some great food and wine! Even with the warm weather, we still enjoy a full Christmas feast! Whether this is your tradition or not, if you’re looking for some great wines to pair with your holiday food, I wanted to share 5 wines perfect for Christmas from Grays. 

    About Grays.com

    Grays.com is an online marketplace where you can purchase just about anything. But did you know it’s also a great place for a good wine deal? They have over 2,000 wines to choose from every day and a great range of Australian and International wines at every price point. From sparkling wine and champagne to chardonnay to shiraz, you can find it on Grays. The best part is that many are available as part of an auction, so you can set the price you want to pay. This makes it a great way to purchase affordable wine for Summer (get my top Summer wine picks here).

    Delivery is speedy and free on select wines, and with a 30-day money-back guarantee you can purchase with confidence with wines delivered to your door. They also have wine advisors to help you find exceptional wines at even better prices. 

    So let’s dive into 5 wines for Christmas meal pairings that are all available at Grays.

    McGuigan The Shortlist Semillon and seafood 

    The warmer weather and holidays bring with them plenty of opportunities for enjoying seafood. I know in my husband’s family we start our Christmas feast with fresh oysters and prawns. The McGuigan The Shortlist Semillon 2018 is a great wine for enjoying with seafood, or even lighter chicken and pork dishes. This makes it a perfect wine for adding to your Christmas feasting. On the nose, it is packed with refreshing citrus notes of lemon and lime with a crisp profile of acidity on the palate. A hint of minerality really rounds out this wine, making it the perfect refreshing sipper. If you’re not a fan of seafood, this wine is also a great option for enjoying light meals or appetisers over the holidays. And if you wanted to give it as a gift, the great thing about Semillon is that you can age it for years to develop buttery, and honey notes. 

    Get this wine here. 

    Commissioners Block Chardonnay 2021 and long lunches

    When I think of the summer holidays I always think of long lunches. With most enjoying some time off work, it’s a great time to get together with friends for some good food and wine. The Commissioners Block Chardonnay 2021 is perfect for holiday feasting as it has a good balance between oaked and unoaked Chardonnay. Lemon curd, pear and stone fruits come through in the aroma, and the palate has a lovely subtle oak to give the wine a nice texture. This makes it a great option for pairing with chicken, BBQ and salmon – all perfect dishes for a long lunch with friends. 

    Get this wine here. 

    Patritti Cabernet Sauvignon and Christmas eve

    Christmas Eve for us is always a feast of delicious, rich foods. No matter how hot it is, we always have roasts with all the trimmings. The Patritti Cabernet Sauvignon is a great McLaren Vale wine for enjoying these richer foods, making it a great option for pairing with Christmas roast. Notes of blackcurrant, mulberry and spice on the nose follow through to a palate that is bold and powerful with notes of toasty oak to balance out the juicy fruit. This wine is decadent and absolutely delightful. It’s sure to be a hit at the dinner table over your Christmas feast. 

    Get this wine here. 

    McGuigan The Shortlist Chardonnay and cheese platters

    We all do a bit of indulging over the holidays, and I love catching up with friends for wine and cheese. There’s something about a cheese platter that is perfect while enjoying those long summer sunsets, and what better to enjoy it than with a rich Chardonnay? The McGuigan The Shortlist Chardonnay is a deliciously smooth Chardonnay with notes of pear, lemon and a creamy texture. Vanilla and apple come together on the palate for a taste sensation that would go oh so well with a gooey brie. 

    Get this wine here. 

    Thomson Estate Shiraz Cabernet and BBQ

    In Summer there are always going to be BBQs with friends and family, and the Thomson Estate Shiraz Cabernet is the perfect wine to bring along. It is full-bodied but drinks a little more medium-bodied thanks to the blend of Shiraz and Cabernet, making it great for enjoying with grilled meats. Notes of pepper, cinnamon and blackberry come together into a wine with a lovely long finish. It’s the kind of wine that is sure to be a crowd-pleaser, which is perfect when looking for wines to enjoy over a BBQ lunch or dinner. 

    Get this wine here. 

    In summary: 5 wines perfect for Christmas from Grays

    Whether you’re celebrating Christmas with friends and family, or just enjoying the holidays, this time of year is the perfect time for a glass or two of nice wine. Grays has a great selection of wines perfect for Christmas, whether you want something light or to pair with meals. And with great prices, you can rest assured you aren’t breaking the bank to get some tasty options! I hope this list of 5 wines perfect for Christmas from Grays helps inspire your Christmas sippers. 

    Visit Grays.com for more

    The post 5 wines perfect for Christmas from Grays appeared first on The Cheeky Vino wine blog.

  • Golden Grove Estate Vermentino 2022
    30 November 2022

     

    Ray Costanzo would have to be Australia's best Vermentino producer. Find me another winemaker that consistently delivers super high-quality wines with this variety. Try something new this summer and embrace delicious whites like this.

    Meticulous and considered in his approach, he says, “Vermentino grows really well in drought conditions and also holds its acidity, but I just love how versatile it is and I use it with portions of skin contact, barrel fermentation and tank ferment.” 

    This 2022 release is back to 100% estate grown fruit due to the two previous years being hampered by low yields due to vintage conditions. As a result, some fruit was sourced from interstate to bulk up production.

    Barrel fermentation (16%) and full skin fermentation (16%) plus a dollop of Semillon (5%) all contribute to this masterful final blend. In short, it's textural, vibrant and oozes summertime. 

    Scents of oyster shell, sea spray and white flowers whip up a frenzy as soon as it hits the glass. Fresh lemons juice runs ripples through the mouth with a sherbety tease. The granite soils whisper with a soft minerality and a subtle creaminess purs as a result of the barrel fermented portion. Perfectly handled acid screams quality as the lemony delish just lingers and calls you back. If you're ever going to try a wine from Queensland (one from 850 metres above sea level no less), this is your starting point.

    Drink to three years+

    95/100

    Region: Granite Belt
    RRP: $35
    Source: Sample

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04 December 2022

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  • Portuguese Native Wine Grapes and the New Age of Discovery
    29 November 2022

    One of the wonderful things about wine is its ability to surprise and delight — there are always new wines made with unusual wine grapes and from unexpected places to enjoy. A person who is bored with wine, given this great discovery potential, is bored with life!

    Portuguese explorers were at the forefront of the “Age of Discovery” that opened the world to economic and cultural exchange. Portugal’s impact on global trade was astonishing considering that it is and was a relatively small country hanging on Europe’s western-most edge.

    Now I propose a reverse movement with respect to Portuguese wine and its native grape varieties. The New Age of Discovery, as I call it, calls for wine enthusiasts to take deep dives into Portugal’s many wine regions and especially to explore native wine grape varieties with unfamiliar names but intriguing flavors and unlimited potential.

    Discovering Portugal Wine Diversity

    Maybe that’s why Italian wines frequently appear on The Wine Economist page (although this is a global wine blog, for example, it was recently named one of the 40 best Italian wine blogs and pages). The wine map of Italy is a colorful mosaic that invites close inspection. But Italy is not alone is this regard. It is time to explore in more depth the diversity that Portugal offers.

    Vini Portugal sent us three wines selected to illustrate three sides of Portuguese wine diversity. The Villa Alvor Singular Moscatel-Galego-Roxo 2020, for example, comes from the Algarve region, which is better known for sunny beaches than lush grapevines.  The Antonio Maçanita Tinta Carvalha 2020, an Alentejo wine, is made from grape varieties now quite rare, but that once dominated the region. This wine brings them back from near-extinction. Finally, the Esporão Reserva Tinto 2019 is an interesting hybrid from a famous Alentejo producer, blending indigenous grapes with international varieties such as Syrah and Cabernet Sauvignon. It tells the story of the winery and the region, too.

    Unexpected Field Blend

    Knowing of our interest in native grape varieties, António Graça, the head of Research and Development at Sogrape Vinhos, arranged for us to receive examples of Casa Ferreirinha Castas Escondidas, a field blend from an old vineyard at Quinta do Seixo in the Douro.

    The grape varieties include such unfamiliar names as Touriga-Fêmea, Tinta Francisca, Bastardo and Marufo, which are sometimes included in Port wine blends, but rarely make themselves known in unfortified wines. Tinta Amarela, Tinto Cão, Touriga Nacional, Touriga Francesa and vinha velha are also part of this unique blend.

    Now it would be easy to dismiss a wine like this as a “kitchen sink” product made up of odds and ends, but that is clearly not the case here as you will know immediately when you taste it. It is really true that what grows together often goes together, and the combination of these wine grapes in the talented hands of Sogrape Douro winemaker Luís Sottomayor results in a distinct and delicious statement of terroir. We found the wine to be complex, balanced, and elegant with a finish that went on and on. An experience as much as a wine. Fantastic.

    Quiet! Old Vines at Work

    António writes that, “We have been surveying our old vineyards and inventoried all varieties present in that vineyard, plant by plant in an effort to identify the patterns of the historical field blend. This wine is the result of the knowledge we gained from that work which we extended now to other old vineyards we own in order to gain knowledge that will assist us in adapting to a warmer climate in an already warm region.”

    “This has led us to develop new vines and wines using blends or single variety wines made from minority varieties, some representing less than 50 hectares as total planted acreage today. The revelation of their sensory aspects has been very reassuring. Examples are Touriga Femea (literally «female Touriga»), Tinta Francisca in the Douro, Sercialinho in Bairrada or Encruzado and Alfrocheiro in Dao.”

    Portuguese winemakers have a lot of material to work with in this new age of discovery. The official wine grape registry lists 343 native varieties so far — incredible diversity for a relatively small region.

    An Age for Discovery

    When I first visited Portugal and began tasting wines made from the native grape varieties, I saw the unfamiliar names as an obstacle to their success on the global market. It made sense to me, I wrote, to market the wines under proprietary brands or in blends with familiar international grape varieties in order to avoid erecting another barrier to entry for consumers new to the country’s wines.

    But things have changed and my opinion has changed with them. The world is re-discovering Portugal as a place to visit or live along with its history, cuisine, and of course its wine. It is the new Age of Discovery and my, but there is a lot to discover in Portuguese wine.

  • Fine wine’s investment credentials: Source of stability
    23 November 2022
    We believe fine wine forms an attractive long-term alternative asset that can play an important role in a diverse investment portfolio alongside other assets. In this article we explore the main potential benefits of a fine wine allocation.
  • Wine Wars II Receives 2023 Gourmand Award for Outstanding “Wine & Sustainability” Book
    22 November 2022

    My latest book, Wine Wars II: The Global Battle for the Soul of Wine, has been recognized by Gourmand International as an outstanding “Wine & Sustainability” book. Four books (see list below) were identified for special recognition in this category, and all are entitled to wear Gourmand’s “Winner” logo for promotional purposes.

    In the spirit of “shameless self-promotion,” I am proud to say that this is not my first Gourmand award. The Wine Economist was recognized as best wine blog in 2015, for example, and Money Taste, and Wine received the 2016 award for best wine writing.

    Wine Wars originally appeared in 2011, when it received several awards, including the Gourmand award for best American wine book. Wine Wars II updates the first volume and expands its argument with a new set of chapters organized around the theme of “Wine’s Triple Crisis.”

    I suspect that this new section, which examines the wine industry’s intertwined economic, environmental, and identity crises, may have caught the Gourmand gurus’ attention by extending the idea of sustainability beyond the natural environment to include economic and social factors, too. As we all know, sustainability to a complicated balancing act, with few simple answers and lots of work to be done.

    Here is the list of winners in the special “Sustainability & Wine.” Congratulations to these authors and all the 2023 Gourmand winners (click here to download complete award list pdf).

  • An Essential Guide to the Grand Cru Wine in France Pt. 2
    22 November 2022

    Grand Cru wines are made from grapes grown in the best vineyards in a particular region. The term ‘Grand Cru’ is used in many wine-producing countries, but it is regulated by law in France. To be classified as a Grand Cru vineyard, the vineyard must be officially designated by the French government.

    Grand Cru wines are often described as more complex and nuanced than other wines, with a greater depth of flavour.

    In part two of today’s article, let’s look at some of the best Grand Cru Wines in the world. Here’s what you need to know:

    2015 Domaine Leroy Musigny Grand Cru

    Few producers can boast of owning a monopole in the Cote de Nuits, but the illustrious Domaine Leroy can. The Musigny vineyard extends just over two hectares and has been in the Leroy family since 1852. The monopole status, combined with the domaine’s impeccable viticultural and winemaking practices, means that the Leroy Musigny is one of the most highly coveted wines in the world.

    The 2015 Leroy Musigny is a truly spectacular wine. The nose is incredibly complex, with dark fruits, spice, and earth aromas. The wine is rich and full-bodied on the palate, with finely integrated tannins and a long, persistent finish. This is a wine that is sure to delight even the most discerning of palates.

    2015 Domaine Georges & Christophe Roumier Musigny Grand Cru

    The Roumier family has been producing some of the finest wines in Burgundy for generations, and the 2015 Musigny is no exception. This wine is made from 100% Pinot Noir grapes and shows off this grape variety’s amazing potential.

    The 2015 Musigny has a beautiful ruby colour, and the nose is full of ripe red fruit and floral aromas. The wine is medium-bodied and elegantly balanced on the palate, with stunning flavours of red fruits, minerals, and spice. The finish is long and persistent, with fine, velvety tannins.

    This exquisite wine is sure to please even the most discerning Burgundy lovers. 

    1991 Domaine Leflaive Montrachet Grand Cru

    In 1991, Domaine Leflaive produced an exceptional Montrachet Grand Cru. This wine is still considered one of the finest examples of this wine style.

    The Domaine Leflaive Montrachet Grand Cru is a white wine made from 100% Chardonnay grapes. The grapes for this wine are grown in the Cote de Beaune region of Burgundy, France. The wine is aged for 12 months in French oak barrels.

    This wine has a beautiful golden colour. The nose is very complex, with aromas of white flowers, stone fruits, and honey. The palate is rich and full-bodied, with peach, apricot, and lemon flavours. The wine has a long, mineral-driven finish.

    1996 Domaine Francois Raveneau Les Clos, Chablis Grand Cru

    1996 Domaine Francois Raveneau Les Clos is a Chablis Grand Cru produced by Domaine Francois Raveneau. The vineyard for this wine is located in the Les Clos area of Chablis, which is known for producing some of the best Chablis wines. The 1996 vintage of this wine is an excellent example of the quality found in Les Clos Chablis.

    The 1996 Domaine Francois Raveneau Les Clos has a beautiful golden colour, with a nose full of ripe fruits and minerals. The palate is rich and full-bodied, with a long finish full of minerality. This wine will taste amazing now but will also age gracefully for many years. This is a wine that will please both Chablis lovers and those who are new to the style.

    2000 Chateau Ausone, Saint-Emilion Grand Cru

    The 2000 Château Ausone is a blend of 75% Cabernet Franc and 25% Merlot. The wine was aged 18 months in 100% new French oak barrels. It was bottled in July 2002 and released onto the market in 2004. The suggested retail price for the 2000 Château Ausone is $2,400.

    The nose is very powerful, with blackberry, cassis, and chocolate aromas. There are also subtle notes of truffle and vanilla. The palate is full-bodied, with firm tannins and good acidity. The wine is very well-balanced, with a long, persistent finish.

    The 2000 Château Ausone is a magnificent wine that will continue to improve in the cellar. 

    1990 Chateau Cheval Blanc, Saint-Emilion Grand Cru

    The Cheval Blanc 1990 is a wine that needs no introduction. It is one of the world’s most iconic and well-renowned wines and has been hailed as a masterpiece by critics and enthusiasts. The Cheval Blanc is a blend of Cabernet Franc and Merlot and is one of the few wines called a “super-second.”

    The wine is deeply concentrated, with a beautiful nose of cassis, blackberry, and chocolate. The palate is full-bodied and powerful, with a long, elegant finish. The Cheval Blanc is a wine meant to be enjoyed now but will also age gracefully for many years.

    2005 Domaine Weinbach Gewurztraminer Mambourg Quintessence de Grains Nobles Cuvee d’Or, Alsace Grand Cru

    Weinbach is a family-owned estate in the Alsace region of France. The estate has been passed down through the generations since 1612, and today, the ninth generation of the Weinbach family is at the helm. The Weinbach style is characterised by elegance and finesse, focusing on terroir-driven wines that reflect the unique character of the Alsace region. 

    This wine is made from grapes affected by noble rot, a fungus that winemakers prize for its ability to add complexity and depth of flavour to the wine. The grapes for this wine were hand-picked and then fermented in small barrels. The wine was then aged for 12 months in French oak barrels. 

    This Gewurztraminer has a beautiful golden colour and a complex nose of honeysuckle, apricot, and spice. The palate is rich and creamy, with honey, dried apricots, and spic flavours. The wine has a long, elegant finish. This is a truly special wine that is perfect for special occasions.

    2006 Domaine Zind-Humbrecht Riesling Brand Selection de Grains Nobles, Alsace Grand Cru

    The 2006 Domaine Zind-Humbrecht Riesling Brand Selection de Grains Nobles is a unique wine from the renowned Zind-Humbrecht estate in Alsace. This Riesling is made from grapes that have been affected by noble rot, resulting in a unique, intense flavour.

    The wine is aged for 12 months in French oak barrels, giving it a complex, nuanced flavour that is perfect for enjoying a special meal. If you’re looking for an exceptional Riesling, the 2006 Domaine Zind-Humbrecht Riesling Brand Selection de Grains Nobles is an excellent choice.

    Grand Cru Wine is Worth Investing In

    Grand Cru wines are some of the most sought-after and prestigious wines worldwide. They are made from the best grapes in the best vineyards and command high prices. Grand Cru wines are expensive, but they are worth the price. They offer a quality that is not available in other wines. If you are looking for a truly special wine, then a Grand Cru is the way to go.

    If you’re interested in buying wine for investment, we can help you. Cru Wine offers fine wine with a modern approach. Wine is a passion and a huge source of enjoyment. Our goal is to make it easier to buy wine. At the same time, we wish to provide you with a more enriched experience. Download our fine wine investment brochure today to learn more.

    The post An Essential Guide to the Grand Cru Wine in France Pt. 2 appeared first on Cru Wine Fine Wine & Spirits Shop.

  • The Rhone Wine: A Magnificent Drink and a Bottle of Class
    22 November 2022

    What are the chances that your next red or white wine selection will be a well-known Rhone wine?

    Considering the incredible variety of wines the Valley offers, quite high, in fact!

    Over two millennia have passed since the beginning of winemaking in the Rhone Valley region of France. Every 13 seconds, a Rhone Valley wine is enjoyed somewhere in the world due to the wine’s immense popularity.

    Let’s learn everything there is to know about these beloved wines, the history of the vineyards in the Rhone Valley, the wine-producing areas, and the top Rhone wine bottles you can add to your collection. We’ll also discuss the most efficient ways to buy these premium wines.

    A Quick Peek at Rhone Wines

    Only Bordeaux is larger in terms of wine production than the Rhone Valley Appellation d’Origine Controlee (AOC). On both banks of the Rhone river, it has more than 71,000 hectares of vast vines.

    About 6,000 vines may be found in the Rhone Valley, which produces about 400 million bottles of wine per year, including the approachable Cotes du Rhone wines and the iconic Cote-Rotie, Chateauneuf du Pape, and Hermitage wines.

    What are “Rhone-style wines”?

    Wines created from Rhone Valley grape varietals, including Syrah, Grenache, Mourvèdre, Viognier, and Roussanne, are referred to as “Rhone wines”, regardless of where they are from. It’s interesting to note that American winemakers who employ Rhone grapes refer to themselves as Rhone Rangers.

    Rhone Valley wines are also called for the region, in contrast to most wine labels that represent the grape variety.

    Let’s now explore the history of the Rhone Valley.

    A Short History of Rhone Valley’s Rich Wine Culture

    Around the sixth century BC, the first vine cultivation in the Rhone region started. A little over 200 years later, Greek colonists established vineyards in Marseille. Some of the earliest vineyards in the world were established in the Northern Rhone region by the first century AD.

    The town of Vienne was established by the Romans as they travelled down the Rhone river. The modern-day Cote-Rotie appellation of the Northern Rhone swiftly rose to prominence as a major wine trading hub.

    After the fall of the Roman empire, the Rhone wine industry saw a slump. The Catholic Church’s influence led to its revival in the Middle Ages. The amount of wine produced increased dramatically during this time, and AOCs like the Cotes du Rhone appellation became important wine regions.

    A little fun fact: The name Châteauneuf-du-Pape, which literally translates to “The Pope’s New Crib,” was given to the nearby appellation in 1309 after the Catholic papacy moved from Rome to Avignon.

    Rhone Valley wines eventually fell out of favour as a result of the Great French Wine Blight of the 1860s, which caused a production problem. But in the 1960s, a handful of committed Rhone winemakers assisted in bringing them back to their previous splendour.

    Next, let’s discover the major wine regions of Rhone Valley.

    The Rhone Valley Wine Regions: North vs. South

    Around 27 different wine varieties are grown in the terroir-rich vineyards of the Rhone Valley.

    Similar to the Paso Robles appellation in the US, the Rhone Valley produces 94% red wines and only 6% whites and is mostly a red grape variety region.

    1. The Northern Rhone Region

    Only around 10% of the entire Rhone Valley wine-growing area is in the Northern Rhone.

    The climate on its hilly terrain is continental. The vineyard lands are constructed as sloped terraces to prevent erosion and give the vines the most sunlight possible. They are also shielded from the chilly Mistral winds by the higher terrain.

    Only a few grape types can grow in the stony soil, which is made up of granite, shingle, and clay. The Northern Rhone wine region is only permitted to grow one red grape variety, Syrah, in accordance with AOC regulations.

    Syrah may be blended with up to 20% white grape varietals to improve flavour (especially in Cote Rotie). Roussanne, Marsanne, and Viognier are three of the most popular white grapes grown in the North.

    2. The Southern Rhone Region

    In terms of vineyard area and production (which accounts for 95% of the region’s wines), the Southern Rhone wine region dwarfs the northern one. More grape types can be found there than in the North, and it has a Mediterranean climate. The area is, however, exposed to the chilly Mistral wind due to the flat landscape.

    The Southern Rhone region permits 13 different grape types. Red and white grape varietals may also be blended in the wine area.

    Grenache is the local grape variety with the highest fame. The other red variations are:

    • Carignan
    • Cinsault 
    • Mourvedre
    • Syrah
    • Terret Noir
    • Vaccarese

    In the Southern Rhone, white varieties are also grown, like:

    • Bourboulenc
    • Clairette
    • Grenache Blanc
    • Roussanne

    Famous appellations, including Châteauneuf-du-Pape, Cote du Rhone, and Tavel AOCs, can be found in the southern Rhone.

    That said, what distinguishes the wines from the North and South Rhone Valleys?

    The Differences between North and South Rhone Wines

    The following are some points where wines from the North and South Rhone Valley are similar and different:

    a) Blending Styles and Flavors

    The wines from both regions have their own unique blending flavours and styles. While the North Rhone Valley is renowned for its single-varietal vinification, the South Rhone Valley is noted for its mixes (e.g. Cotes du Rhone wine).

    b) Grape Harvesting

    The grapes in the hilly Northern Rhone are primarily picked by hand, whilst those in the Southern Rhone are frequently picked by machinery.

    c) Aging Potential

    Northern Rhone wines take time to mature, and you’ll be able to appreciate them most after ten years or more in the cellar. While many Southern Rhone wines are best served young, some, like Châteauneuf-du-Pape, age nicely.

    d) Price

    The southern Rhone Valley has more reasonably priced wines than the northern Rhone Valley. Northern wines are more exclusive and sought-after because they make up only 5% of all Rhone wines.

    The Rhone wine is truly a magnificent drink. It has a rich history dating back to the Roman empire, and its production has been perfected over centuries. The wine is made from a variety of grapes, each of which contributes its own unique flavour. The result is a complex and nuanced wine that is perfect for any occasion. Whether you are enjoying a glass with a meal or simply sipping it on its own, the Rhone wine is sure to please.

    If you are looking to buy vintage wines in the UK, look no further than our amazing selections of bottles here at Cru Wine. We provide fine wine with a modern approach, ensuring that buying wine is made easy and simple with a more enriched experience. Check out our online shop for more of our wine collections and their prices.

    The post The Rhone Wine: A Magnificent Drink and a Bottle of Class appeared first on Cru Wine Fine Wine & Spirits Shop.

  • What People Need to Know about Burgundy
    22 November 2022

    Burgundy is the most complex and difficult wine region to understand, and even after years of study, it can still be confusing. You’d hear people say they pay a high price for their Burgundy wine only to be disappointed, while many others agree that the best wines they’ve ever tasted come from Burgundy. If you are looking for the best wines for investment, you’d naturally want to learn more about Burgundy and its wines.

    Here, we’ll try to make sense of this famous wine region:

    The Grapes You’ll Find in Burgundy

    Burgundy is world-renowned for its Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes, but a wide variety of grapes are grown in this French region. In addition to the two most famous grapes, you’ll also find Gamay, Aligoté, Pinot Blanc, and Sauvignon Blanc in Burgundy.

    • Pinot Noir is the most planted grape in Burgundy and is responsible for some of the region’s most famous wines. The grape thrives in Burgundy’s climate and soil, producing complex and elegant wines.
    • Chardonnay is the second most planted variant of grape in Burgundy and also produces some of the region’s most beloved wines. Chardonnay wines from Burgundy tend to be rich and buttery, with a beautiful minerality.
    • Gamay is a grape often associated with Beaujolais, but it is also grown in Burgundy. Gamay wines are typically lighter and more fruit-forward than Pinot Noir wines.
    • Aligoté is another grape typically associated with Beaujolais, but it is also grown in Burgundy. Aligoté wines are typically crisp and refreshing, making them perfect for summertime sipping.
    • Pinot Blanc is a white grape that is sometimes used in the production of Champagne. In Burgundy, Pinot Blanc wines are typically dry and full-bodied, with a beautiful minerality.
    • Sauvignon Blanc is a white grape most commonly associated with the Loire Valley. In Burgundy, Sauvignon Blanc wines tend to be more restrained and elegant than their Loire Valley counterparts.
    Main Wine Regions in Burgundy

    Burgundy is among the most popular wine regions in the world, known for its high-quality Pinot Noir and Chardonnay wines. The region is located in eastern France, in the Côte d’Or department.

    The Burgundy wine region is divided into four main sub-regions: the Côte de Nuits, the Côte de Beaune, the Côte Chalonnaise, and the Mâconnais. Each of these sub-regions produces wines with distinctive flavour and character.

    Côte de Nuits

    The Côte de Nuits is the northernmost sub-region of Burgundy and is home to some of the most well-known and most prestigious vineyards in the region, such as the Grand Cru vineyards of Vosne-Romanée as well as Nuits-Saint-Georges. The wines of the Côte de Nuits are typically rich and full-bodied, with flavors of black cherries, strawberries, and spice.

    Côte de Beaune

    The Côte de Beaune is the southernmost sub-region of Burgundy and is known for its exemplary white wines, made from the Chardonnay grape. The Côte de Beaune also produces some red wines from the Pinot Noir grape. The wines of the Côte de Beaune are typically more delicate and elegant than the wines of the Côte de Nuits, with flavors of citrus, apples, and flowers.

    Côte Chalonnaise

    The Côte Chalonnaise is a small sub-region between the Côte de Nuits and the Côte de Beaune. The wines of the Côte Chalonnaise are typically lighter and more fruit-forward than the wines of the Côte de Nuits and the Côte de Beaune.

    Mâconnais

    The Mâconnais is the largest sub-region of Burgundy and is located in the southern part of the region. The Mâconnais is known for its white wines, made from the Chardonnay grape. The wines of the Mâconnais are typically fresh and lively, with citrus and stone fruits flavours.

    The Classification System of Burgundy

    The Classification System of Burgundy is a wine classification system used in the Burgundy wine region of France. The system is based on the Appellation d’origine contrôlée (AOC) classification system but has some critical differences.

    The classification system of Burgundy was created in the early 20th century by the Burgundy Wine growers’ Association to protect the reputation of Burgundy wines. The system classifies wines into four categories based on their quality and production methods.

    The four categories are:

    Grand Cru: The highest quality category, representing less than 5% of the total production of Burgundy wines. Wines in this category are typically made from grapes grown in the best vineyards and are subject to the most stringent production standards.

    Premier Cru: The second highest quality category, representing 20% of the total production of Burgundy wines. Wines in this category are made from grapes grown in very good vineyards and are subject to stricter production standards than wines in the lower categories.

    Village: The third quality category, representing 75% of the total production of Burgundy wines. Wines in this category are made from grapes grown in any of the villages in the Burgundy region.

    Regional: The lowest quality category, representing 5% of the total production of Burgundy wines. Wines in this category are made from grapes grown in any region of France and are subject to the least stringent production standards.

    The classification system of Burgundy is not static, and wines can be moved up or down in classification based on changes in quality. For example, a wine downgraded from village to regional level may no longer be labelled with the name of the village where the grapes were grown.

    The classification system of Burgundy has been criticized for being too rigid and inflexible and for not taking into account the quality of the wine-making process. Nevertheless, it remains the most important factor in determining the price of Burgundy wines.

    Complex or Not, Still the Most Sought-After Wines

    Burgundy wine is some of the most highly prized and sought-after wines for investment in the world. But it cannot be denied that Burgundy is also among the most complicated wine regions. There are confusing rules and regulations governing what can and cannot be called Burgundy wine, and even the most experienced wine lovers can find themselves scratching their heads when trying to navigate the region’s wines.

    But now that you know the basics of Burgundy wine, you’re well on your way to becoming a Burgundy expert.

    Cru Wine offers some of the finest wines for investment in the United Kingdom. We make buying wine easier for you, so find out how you can start collecting Burgundy wines!

    The post What People Need to Know about Burgundy appeared first on Cru Wine Fine Wine & Spirits Shop.

  • What’s Ahead for U.S. Wine? Searching for a Crystal Ball
    15 November 2022

    We are starting to gear up for the State of the Industry session at the 2023 Unified Wine & Grape Symposium and it looks like we will have a lot to talk about. The challenges the wine industry faces are significant and this year’s expert panel (Danny Brager, Glenn Proctor, Dr. Liz Thach MW, Jeff Bitter) is well-prepared to help us navigate the wine-dark seas.

    Everyone wants to know what’s in the future — what will the U.S. wine market look like a a year? Five years? Ten years? Prediction is difficult for a variety of reasons, however, not least because the wine economy is embedded in the national and global economies, which are themselves full of uncertainty these days.

    Looking for a Crystal Ball

    Back in the days when I was writing university-level economics textbooks I told students looking for clues about the future to consult what are called leading economic indicators. The idea is that there are a lot of economic statistics available. Some tell you what has already happened (these are the lagging indicators), some give you an idea of what’s going on right now (coincident indicators), and a few offer a glimpse of possible future trends (leading indicators).

    The number of new building permits and housing starts are leading indicators, for example. Once a permit is issued or construction begun, that sets in motion a chain reaction of economic activity that extends out into the future.

    Durable goods orders are another leading indicator of economic activity in general, but they speak to attitudes and expectations. Durable goods, by definition, are long-lasting and need not be re-purchased every week or month. If consumers and business increase durable goods purchases, then it suggests that they are optimistic about the future and willing to make an investment now rather than wait for the future.

    One economist, famous for his mastery of esoteric details, used to focus in particular on sales of new brooms on the theory that an old broom will always do if you are concerned about future finances. Buying a new broom is therefore a clear statement of economic optimism. That makes sense when you think about brooms as a gateway durable good.

    It is maybe a little bit disturbing to learn that Alan Greenspan, the former Fed chair, once identified sales of men’s underwear as an important leading indicator. Really? Apparently, underwear sales are pretty steady, so any blip one way or another says something significant about consumer expectations. If you want to start an interesting conversation, try asking your male friends how long it has been since they re-stocked their underwear drawer. “Why are you asking?”  People are so suspicious!

    Where is Wine Headed?

    There are many other recognized leading indicators for the overall economy — the yield curve, for example — but there isn’t room here today to talk about them because I’m interested in the wine industry and I wonder what statistics might be particular useful in forecasting the future of wine sales?

    One approach is to use the chain-reaction theory. Where does the decision to buy more or less wine begin? What early indicator can we monitor today that will reveal something about how much wine, what kind of wine, and at what price consumers will choose in the future? Corkscrews? Well, I suppose that’s a wine-specific durable good, but I don’t think tracking corkscrew or even wine glass sales is going to help much.

    Recently I stumbled upon news that I think is relevant to the “wine leading indicator” search, even if the data is not exactly what I am looking for. The news? Costco has decided not to raise its membership fees this year. Here’s why I think the Costco news could be important.

    The Costco Effect

    Lots of people enjoy wine and it is sold in lots of ways and places. But, as we all know, the core wine market is surprisingly narrow. When you take away the U.S. consumers who don’t consume any alcohol (about 35% according to a Wine Market Council study a few years ago) and then those who use alcohol but not wine (21%), the residual is surprisingly narrow.

    While 29% of consumers buy wine a few times and month or year, the industry actually relies on a relatively small number (15%) of high frequency wine drinkers who pull corks or unscrew caps pretty much every week. The demographics of this group — and especially the high-end buyer subset — is key to the future of American wine.

    If you want to know what these consumers look like, I think a good place to start is by going to your closest Costco warehouse store. I am not saying that the Costco demographic matches up perfectly with wine demand or that purchases in other sales channels are unimportant. It is just that the relatively affluent user base at Costco, the people who are willing and able to pay the $60 to $120 annual membership fee here in the United States, are a group worth watching closely. They buy lots of stuff at Costco, including a surprisingly large amount of wine given the limited number of stores.

    Now you might think that tracking Costco wine sales would be good economic indicator, but it doesn’t serve our purpose here because it would be a lagging or maybe coincident economic indicator and not the forward-looking insight needed. But there is one bit of Costco data that I think it useful — and it is flashing yellow (but not yet red) right now: the annual membership fee.

    Hot Dogs and Rotisserie Chickens?

    Most prices at Costco rise and fall with market forces (the costs of rotisserie chickens and the hot dog meal are notable exceptions having been fixed for years). The membership fee is a critical factor at Costco. The fees themselves account for a substantial amount of the company’s net profit and the renewal rate is high — over 90 percent. Costco typically adjusts its membership fee about once every five years, according to news reports, and the last time they did was in 2017. So no one would have been surprised if a rise was announced in 2022.

    But this time around the Costco gurus looked hard at their customer base … and blinked. They decided to pass on a fee increase, which could mean a lot of things but might mean that they believe even their affluent member base is feeling the economic heat. And that’s not good news for wine, since these are the customers driving the U.S. market these days.

    Is this the leading indicator for wine sales I was looking for? No, it isn’t, so I am still looking. Ideas? Please let me know. In the meantime, while as a Costco member I am glad that the annual fee is frozen this time around, it will be good news for the wine trade when Costco decides that their affluent, wine-drinking patrons are secure enough to tolerate a rise in rates.

  • A Champagne for all occasions: Food pairings for the world’s greatest sparkling wine
    13 November 2022
    The first sip of a chilled glass of Champagne is one of life’s greatest pleasures. Cult Wines’ Global Head of Events Olivia Bodle outlines her favourite food pairings for Champagne; some conventional and some a little more off the wall.
  • Rioja to Walla Walla: Celebrating Tempranillo Day
    08 November 2022

    There are a lot of holidays that are centered around wine. The one that we most often celebrate here at Wine Economist world headquarters is Open That Bottle Night — the excuse to open special bottles for no particular reason other than to enjoy them. It comes around every year on the last Saturday in February, although you really don’t need to wait if you don’t want to.

    This year we are adding Tempranillo Day to our holiday list. It’s coming right up — Thursday, November 10, 2022 — so get your corkscrews out and ready to go!

    Tempranillo World on the Rise

    Tempranillo is most closely associate with Spain and its famouos Rioja wines, of course, but it has become a global phenomenon according to the 2022 edition of Which Winegrape Varieties are Grown Where? by Kym Anderson and Signe Nelgen.   Tempranillo was the grape variety with largest expanded plantings during the 2000 to 2016 period of their study (see table above taken from the Anderson-Nelgen report).

    The new Tempranillo plantings are concentrated in Spain, where it has become even more important than in previous years as winegrowers have upgraded their vineyards, but also Portugal and Argentina.  Australia, the United States, Chile, and even France have seen significant new plantings of this popular grape variety.

    Tempranillo #1 — ahead of Cabernet, Syrah, and Sauvignon Blanc in the new-planting league table. Incredible. But maybe it really shouldn’t be a surprise. Tempranillo is a very versatile wine grape that can take on a number of guises depending upon where it is grown and how the wine is made.

    New World Tempranillo

    Tempranillo has a history in California, according to the standard reference, Wine Grapes. It was planted in the Central Valley alongside (and sometimes inter-mingled with) heat loving Zinfandel. Artesa Winery (owned by Spain’s famous Raventós Codorníu family) has recently planted Tempranillo vines in its higher-elevation estate vineyard. Sue and I are looking forward to tasting this wine when it is released.

    Tempranillo gets a lot of attention here in the Pacific Northwest. Walla Walla’s cult winemaker Cayuse Vineyards has made a Tempranillo called Impulsivo since 2002 and it gets consistently rave reviews. Critic Jeb Dunnock says of the 2019 vintage that “You’re not going to find a better Tempranillo in the US, and it will stand toe to toe with the best out there,” by which I think he invites comparison with the best of Spain.  That’s quite a challenge.

    The Cayuse team also makes a remarkably delicious and well-balanced Tempranillo for their No Girls label, which Sue declared to be even better than  the Impulsivo at this stage of development when we tasted them both. The Impulsivo was very good, she said, but the No Girls was great — very memorable.

    There are several others you will find in the Walla Walla, many making good use of grapes from The Rocks District of Milton-Freewater. One that we found particularly interesting on our last visit was The Walls winery’s Wonderful Nightmare.

    Oregon’s Other Signature Grape?

    If you are telling the story of premium Tempranillo in America, a good place to start is about 40 years ago when Earl Jones began his quest to make quality Tempranillo on U.S. soil. He considered Washington and Idaho but was discouraged by the (very real) possibility of vine-killing freezing temperatures.  Jones’s path ended in an unexpected place: south-west Oregon’s Umpqua Valley and his Abacela Winery.

    Abacela’s success with Spanish wine grape varieties clearly demonstrates the folly of the idea that a state or region must be defined by a particular signature grape. Oregon may be Pinot Noir to many wine enthusiasts, but that’s far from the whole story. Taste the Abacela wines and you will know what I mean.

    And then there is Idaho Tempranillo. If you visit Boise, Idaho you will probably be directed to the Basque Block, a downtown area that honors the state’s active Basque community (food tip: Bar Gernika for the Solomo sandwich). Maybe that Iberian connection is one reason Tempranillo was planted some years ago in the Skyline vineyard and several wineries make a Tempranillo wine today. Look for award-winning Cinder Tempranillo and for  Fujishin Family Cellars Tempranillo, too, both from the Snake River Valley AVA.

    The Tempranillo boom extends to Texas, according to Wine Grapes, and also includes regions Canada, Mexico, New Zealand, Switzerland, Turkey, and Malta.  Winegrowers and wine-drinkers around the world can’t seem to resist it. Tempranillo is one of global wine’s success stories, so it is worth pulling a cork on Thursday and celebrating Tempranillo Day!

    >>><<<

    Thanks to the crew at Bionic Wines for samples of the Cayuse and No Girls Tempranillo wines. Special thanks to Jim Thomssen for information about Tempranillo in Idaho.

  • An Essential Guide to the Grand Cru Wine in France Pt. 1
    07 November 2022

    Wine is often thought of as a simple beverage to be enjoyed with a meal or as an accompaniment to a good conversation. However, there is much more to wine than most people think.

    For starters, wine is made from grapes, and there are many different types of grapes, each with its flavour profile. In addition, the way the grapes are grown, harvested, and processed can affect the final flavour of the wine. And, of course, the climate in which the grapes are grown also plays a role.

    All of these factors combine to create a huge variety of wines, each with its unique flavour. And that’s not even considering the many different styles of wine, from light and fruity whites to rich and full-bodied reds.

    However, a whole other side to wine involves luxury, investment, and so much more. Today, let’s take a deep dive into that world.

    Grand Cru Wine

    A Grand Cru Wine is a wine that has been designated as being of exceptional quality. The term is most commonly used in France as part of the official wine classification system. A Grand Cru wine must be produced in a specified vineyard or cru, and the grapes must be grown according to certain regulations. The wine must also meet certain standards in terms of taste and aroma.

    There are several levels of quality in the French classification system, with Grand Cru wines being the highest quality. To be classified as a Grand Cru wine, a wine must first be classified as a premier cru wine. Premier cru wines are produced in specific vineyards or crus and meet certain standards regarding taste and aroma.

    Grand Cru wines are often more expensive than other wines, as they are of a higher quality. They are also usually more limited in production, as the grapes used to make them are grown in specific conditions.

    If you are looking for a wine of exceptional quality, then a Grand Cru wine is a good option. These wines are produced in specific vineyards and are subject to strict regulations. They are also often more expensive than other wines, but this is because they are of a higher quality.

    Grand Cru Wine vs Premier Cru Wine

    When it comes to wine, there are different levels of quality that are determined by a number of factors. Two of the most common terms you’ll see when discussing wine quality are “Grand Cru” and “Premier Cru.” But what exactly do these terms mean? 

    Grand Cru wine is made from grapes from the best vineyards in a specific region. “Grand Cru” means “great growth” in French. To be classified as a Grand Cru vineyard, the vineyard must be officially recognised by the government of the wine-producing country.

    Premier Cru wine is also made from high-quality grapes, but the vineyards are not as prestigious as those that produce Grand Cru wine. The term “Premier Cru” means “first growth” in French. The government of the wine-producing country typically classifies Premier Cru vineyards, but the classification is not as stringent as it is for Grand Cru vineyards.

    So, what’s the difference between Grand Cru and Premier Cru wine? The main difference is the quality of the grapes. Grand Cru grapes are the best, while Premier Cru grapes are simply high-quality. This difference is reflected in the price of the wine, with Grand Cru wine being more expensive than Premier Cru.

    If you’re looking for the best wine, go for a Grand Cru. If you’re looking for a high-quality wine that’s more affordable, go for a Premier Cru.

    The History of Grand Cru Wine

    The classification of Grand Cru wines began in the Burgundy region of France in the Middle Ages. The Duke of Burgundy, Philip the Bold, commissioned a study to find the best vineyards in the region. The study was conducted by a monk named Hugh de Villars and was completed in 1395.

    The de Villars study identified four highest-quality vineyards: Clos de Vougeot, Romanée-Conti, Chambertin, and Musigny. These four vineyards became known as the “first growths”, and their wines were the first Grand Cru wines.

    Since then, the classification of Grand Cru wines has evolved and expanded. In 1855, the Bordeaux region of France classified its wines into five categories, or “growths”. The first growths were Châteaux Lafite, Latour, Margaux, Haut-Brion, and Mouton Rothschild.

    In the 20th century, other regions of France, such as the Rhône Valley and Champagne, began classifying their wines as Grand Cru. And in 1973, the European Union established a quality control and labelling system for wine, which included the classification of Grand Cru wines.

    Today, there are hundreds of Grand Cru wines produced all over the world. They are typically made from the highest quality grapes and are aged for longer periods than other wines. As a result, they are often more expensive than other wines.

    If you’re looking to try a Grand Cru wine, there are many options. But be prepared to pay a premium price for these prestigious wines.

    How to Achieve Grand Cru Status By Region

    To truly understand wine, one must first understand the land from whence it came. The concept of terroir—the unique combination of climate, soil, and topography that gives a wine its distinctive character—is at the heart of what makes each wine region so special. And nowhere is this more apparent than in the world of Grand Cru wines.

    In order to achieve Grand Cru status, a wine must be produced in a specific vineyard that has been classified as such by the relevant regional authority. For example, Burgundy has only 33 Grand Cru vineyards. These vineyards are classified according to a strict hierarchy, with the best sites classified as Grand Cru Premier Cru.

    In Bordeaux, meanwhile, there are around 5,000 châteaux producing wine, but only around 60 of these have been classified as Grand Cru Classé. The classification system here is much more detailed, with wines being graded according to the specific vineyard in which they were produced.

    Champagne, too, has a specific classification system for its Grand Cru vineyards. There are just 17 these vineyards located in specific villages that have been determined to have the ideal combination of climate and soil for producing high-quality Champagne.

    Finally, in Alsace, there are just over 51 Grand Cru vineyards. These vineyards are classified according to the specific grape variety that is grown in them, with Riesling, Gewürztraminer, and Pinot Gris being the most common.

    What it Takes to Have a Grand Cru Status

    In short, it takes a combination of exceptional terroir and a classification system to identify and reward the best sites. But more than anything, it takes a dedication to producing the highest quality wines possible.

    If you’re interested in buying wine for investment, we can help you. Cru Wine offers fine wine with a modern approach. Wine is a passion and a huge source of enjoyment. Our goal is to make it easier to buy wine. At the same time, we wish to provide you with a more enriched experience. Download our fine wine investment brochure today to learn more!

    The post An Essential Guide to the Grand Cru Wine in France Pt. 1 appeared first on Cru Wine Fine Wine & Spirits Shop.

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  • The History of the Cocktail Party
    04 December 2022

    For many people, the holidays are synonymous with the season of giving. But for those who love to host and entertain, this festive time of year means just one thing: cocktail parties and swanky holiday soirées. The allure of a glamorous night of boozy drinks, dapper attire, and Champagne served in coupe glasses is hard to ignore. And as December begins, it only seems fitting to ponder how this elegant drinking ritual began.

    Some sources credit British novelist Alec Waugh as the inventor of cocktail parties following an article he penned for Esquire about hosting the first party in 1924. But more sources point to 1917 and Clara Bell Walsh, a Kentucky-born heiress and New York socialite known for throwing lavish parties with exclusive guest lists. On one spring day in April 1917, Walsh threw her most legendary soirée to date, which would etch her name in history as the creator of the cocktail party.

    But was Walsh’s gathering really the first of its kind? Surely imbibing events such as this had occurred before. After all, mixed alcoholic drinks such as punch date as far back as the 1600s, not to mention that Jerry Thomas published the official cocktail guide more than 50 years earlier, in 1862.

    While Thomas’s guide can be seen as the first dedicated cocktail book, it provided no decor advice nor etiquette tips for throwing a party focused entirely on drinking. For that, Walsh and many other women relied heavily on other writings found in the newspapers of the day.

    A New Era

    According to Elizabeth Pearce, drinks historian and founder of Drink & Learn, an interactive experience and guide to cocktails in New Orleans, the “Women’s Section” in newspapers provided domestic advice, including food and drink recipes. As talk of Prohibition gained steam, due to the efforts of the temperance movement, American drinking culture began to shift from the saloon to the home. “At that time, cocktail culture was something that took place outside the home, but with Prohibition looming all that changed, and there was a strong emphasis on women learning to host and entertain with alcohol at home,” Pearce says.

    Although Prohibition didn’t begin until 1920, Americans knew it was coming. “With the 18th Amendment banning only the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcohol, and not the consumption or even possession of it, many people began to stockpile liquor with the intent to consume it at home,” Pearce says. (On a now famous occasion, silent actress Charlotte Hennessey Smith bought the entire contents of a liquor store and had it delivered to her home for the dry months to come.)

    At this same time, the “New Woman” era arose, bringing forth independent women challenging the boundaries of a male-dominated society. The feminist ideal bid adieu to domestic traditions, such as long, multi-course formal dinners, and instead favored more casual get-togethers. Interestingly enough, despite Prohibition, newspapers continued to market the necessary accouterments for preparing drinks and hosting in their women’s sections during this time.

    With the combination of drinks advice from domestic publications, the closures of bars, and the emerging freedom of feminism, women everywhere were poised to take cocktail culture into their own hands. “Given the time, most women were used to having guests over for dinners, or tea, but the notion of hosting an event focused around cocktails comes about because of Prohibition,” Pearce says.

    While it’s likely that other parties were occurring around this time, somehow Walsh’s took the cake.

    Who Was Clara Walsh?

    Born in Kentucky in 1884, Walsh grew up in the spotlight of her wealthy father. Though he died when she was 8, he entrusted her with a fortune that would ensure her place in society and fund her busy social life.

    In her adult years, Walsh went on to marry a wealthy man from St. Louis and, more notably, became one of the first residents of the Plaza Hotel in New York City. Her life in New York was a whirlwind of extravagant parties and she was no stranger to hosting them or being in the spotlight. In fact, Walsh was often featured in prominent publications such as The New Yorker and Esquire, which deemed her the “First Lady of the Plaza.”

    But her most notable mention came from a local Washington newspaper, “The Tacoma Times.” On April 17, 1917, the publication dubbed one of Walsh’s grand affairs a “cocktail party” and declared them the new “stunt” of society.

    The article praises Walsh’s innovation. “Positively the newest stunt in society is the giving of ‘cocktail parties,’” it says, and gives readers a glimpse into Walsh’s first affair: “The party scored an instant hit. Mrs. Walsh’s home is equipped with a private bar. Around this the guests gathered and gave their orders to a white coated professional drink mixer who presided behind the polished mahogany.”

    The revolutionary gathering took place at her father-in-law’s home in St. Louis and placed Walsh as the epitome of the modern woman — sophisticated, independent, and a cocktail drinker not shy about her desires. Though Prohibition would slow the occurrence of future cocktail parties, Walsh’s contribution to cocktail culture would not be forgotten.

    Today we remember Walsh as the mixing maven who gave us the thrill of lavish gatherings fueled by glamor and drinks. This year, as you’re toasting to the season, why not raise a glass to the woman who started it all, Mrs. Clara Bell Walsh?

    The article The History of the Cocktail Party appeared first on VinePair.

  • You are God’s Prophet
    04 December 2022

    By Heidi Harvey

     

     

    “so that together you may with one voice
    glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.”~Romans 15:6

     

    I am amazed by the prophets of old – how they heard God’s voice and loudly, clearly, and courageously shared what God told them. In today’s readings, Isaiah’s prophecy is fulfilled in John the Baptist’s heralding, “Prepare the Way of the Lord! Make straight His paths!” Prophets have a deep intimacy with the Lord in prayer, leading them to hear God’s voice clearly. They trusted God, believing what He said and proclaiming it with great courage.

    How did they hear God’s voice so clearly?

    They communicated intimately with God! Communication is at the heart of all relationships creating a two-way street for sharing hearts and minds, which forms a deeper level of trust. In the spiritual life, this is called prayer. Intimacy in prayer leads to hearing God’s voice.

    Can you hear the voice of the Lord and speak on His behalf?

    Of course, you can!! As God’s sheep, we are promised that we can hear the Shepherd’s voice. At our Baptism, we were anointed with the great honor of Christ’s priestly, kingly, and prophetic mission.

    God wants us to speak for Him!

    Our Catholic faith teaches that public revelation was completed with the last apostle, but private revelation continues. In Lumen Gentium, we hear that “the holy people of God also share in Christ’s prophetic office. It spreads abroad a living witness to Him, especially by means of a life of faith and charity and by offering to God a sacrifice of praise, the tribute of lips which give praise to His name.”

    Imagine that! God wants to use your voice and YOU to be His prophet! 

    The readings remind us that today’s world needs prophets who speak life so “all flesh shall see the salvation of God.”

    So how do we speak prophetically?

    Hearing God’s voice requires discernment. It takes practice to understand what He is saying, how to interpret it, and to apply it. We start as lambs that grow into greater maturity as sheep who hear His voice. Sometimes God’s voice can sound like our own voice, a thought in our mind, or sometimes He uses our imagination or dreams to speak to us. Some may hear it, others may see images, and others may feel a sensation, but we can all hear God’s voice.  

    It is exhilarating to encounter the Lord and to really hear His voice!  

    Sadly, the opposite is true – if we are not talking with God, we will not have intimacy with Him. Without intimacy, we cannot trust Him. Without trust in God’s promises, we cannot receive what he has for us, and the evil one loves a powerless church that cannot hear, see or speak.  

    Hearing the voice of God is transformational in people’s lives. The world desperately needs to encounter God’s truth and His promises!  

    So, ask God to hear His voice and pray to hear Him for others.  

    What is He calling you to share?

     

    Prayer

    Speak to me, Lord; your servant is listening. Ask the Lord how He feels about you. Then ask Him what He wants you to share with others to bring hope and encouragement.

    Call to Action

     With trusting discernment, courage, and love, go out and be God’s prophet heralding the Good News with one voice!

     

    © 2022 WINE — All Rights Reserved

    The post You are God’s Prophet appeared first on WINE.

  • La Goulayance 2022
    04 December 2022
    The crowd

    Paris, 12th arrondissement,
    This was another beautiful edition of La Goulayance, and it took place again in the premises of Ground Countrol, this vibrant venue set in a former railway locomotive workshop, I can't but encourage you to visit the place, have a drink, read books, play games, whatever this place offers which is pretty diverse, and families are welcome. Entry fee was 10 €, you were given a glass which you could keep after tasting the exciting natural wines of many vintners, who were present of course to chat with visitors and buyers. You could buy cases of wines or individual bottles on the site, that was also the good thing, direct from the producers. The vintn,ers took also time to walk around and taste their colleagues/friends' wines of course and I'm sure that's also what brought many of them here. I didn't taste many of them alas, having to ride my bike back to the Aube in the afternoon, possibly before dark (and the tasting on both days was starting at 12, not the usual 10, that's the low point).

    Nicolas Carmarans

    Tasting again the wines of Nicolas Carmarans was already a treat and a reason to come here, but virtually the presence of every producer here was a triggering factor to visit even if the weather had been horrible outside... I learned that Nicolas had changed his house, cellar and chai, so I'm sure it's for the best and his new place must be terrific. He said at one point that recently he stumbled upon Marcel Richaud in an Italian restaurant in Paris, he hadn't seen him for a long time and it was a nice reunion.
    __ Selves 2021, Chenin growing on granite terroir, élevage one year in barrel. In 2021 he lost 3/4 of his grapes with the frost. Nice mouth with energy, bottled in july 2022. 16 € public price here.
    __ Josette 2021, Fer Servadou, bottled august 2022. Light color, he says it's an infusion a light maceration. Some reduction on the nose. A thirst wine with a light body but alive. 13 €.
    __ Mauvais Temps 2020. Fer Servadou on red clay. He says that now he makes only reds with Fer Servadou, he hasn't any Gamay and Négrette Bagnard anymore, and he says that it maybe somehow means that these varieties weren't really fit for the place, so he doesn't regret. Deeper wine here, and I really appreciate it after warming my glass. A real pleasure ! 14 € Not to miss.
    __ Minimus Primeur 2022. He says jokingly it's m&aybe the 1st time he offers 3 vintages to be poured in a tasting... This Minimus is sold out, he just had a few bottles to taste. Fer Servadou also here. Look at thye terrific color on the picture, it tastes as good as it looks ! Some sweetness feel in the mouth, but no residual sugar, and I find also a white-wine mouthfeel somehow here. Lovely primeur, I understand why sold out.

    Christophe Foucher

    At least here was a vigneron I visited not that long ago, namely Christophe Foucher of La Lunotte, the reason being his wine farm is not far from my Loire hideout. He brought only 2 cuvées because that's what is bottled right now and ready for sale.

    __ Rossignoux2 2020, a version of Christophe's Sauvignon, depending of how the fermentation and vinification unfolded, all by itsel of course, but mother Nature has its mysteries. The wine stayed 2 years in barrels and one year in tank. Nice oxidative notes, also dry raisin. 12 €.
    __ Rossignoux3 2019. Nose with honeyish notes, nice acidulous mouth, good length as well. 14,5 % alcohol but still easy to drink, no problem at all. This year the fermentations were really unusually easy and swift, all hiw wines were finished before winter and that's the first time it happens. He says that it's been 3 years he doesn't use copper at all in his vineyards and that may explain the turnaround in the fermentation process, it often takes time for something changed in the vineyard management to translate into a difference in the wines themselves, and that could be it.

    Gerald Oustric

    Also there the unmistakable Gerald Oustric of Le Mazel, who helped create this vibrant nucleus of natural-wine producers in the Ardèche, all nice people with their exciting (and affordable) wines. Gerald brought 4 cuvée to Paris that day.
    __ Mias 2020, 100 % Viognier, a turbid wine with lemonish color. So good ! A pure-pleasure juice type of wine ! Feels new like a primeur actually, hard to think it's a 2020 ! Bottled april 2022. And like usual he waited 3 months after that to begin sell it. 13 % alc. Dry wine even though some sweetness feel. Not to miss. 13 €.
    __ Chardonnières 2020, a Chardonnay (also Vin de France of course). Here there is residual sugar (4 or 5 grams), but CO2 on the tongue that protects the wine. Screw cap here. So goo too, with this light tickling on the palate, indeed alive, full, whole, lovely wine ! 13 €.
    __ Briand 2018, Grenache. On the market for 6 months. Super nose, gourmand, with noticeable tannin chew. Not very dark. He says 2018 was a high yield year and here in addition he did a short maceration, 15 days with élevage in cement tanks and stainless steel as well. 12 €.
    __ Larmande 2021, Syrah. Here is obviously a wine with character, and a young one at this point. He confirms that this is in its infancy and will age well. My stomach aproves noisingly. Not to miss as well and keep in a corner of the cellar for a while... 12 €.

    François Ecot

    And Francois Ecot being there I couldn't miss him either, even if he brought only one cuvée, the rest being sold out, he just has another cuvée, a petnat which should be ready later. He says the price for grapes has increased dramatically even in his remote, northern part of Burgundy and he was forced to look elsewhere for his purchased grapes, so this year he found growers in Catalogna, and the transportation price to bring the grapes from there in refrigerated truck is the same compared to buying smaller batched from Burgundy. And when he buys to these Spanish growers, he can offer them a higher price than what the local wineries offer

    __ Sapucaï, the name of this cuvée comes from a Paraguayan name. Blend of Carignan, Merlot, Tempranillo, Syrah. Whole cluster maceration in cement, élevage in 15-hectoliter and 18-hectoliter barrels plus an amphora. Very nice mouth, super interesting, I'm surprised also at the light color and light tannic touch for a Spanish red, he says that what is important is not to do early remontages. He notes that tannin can also be brought inadvertedly by the seed in the grapes. There's also a white-wine mouthfeel in this wine, I think. 12 € without tax for export for this wine.

    Nadia Charmasson

    On the same block of tables I spotted Nadia Charmasson of Balazu des Vaussières and stopped there to have news and taste the wines. Se says the drought this year was particularly severe and thus they made no reds in 2022. She says there were hot winds at one point in summer and these winds dried out a lot of grapes.
    __ Cuvée Cerisier du Japon 2018, 100 % Grenache. Light color 2018 was a year with a vicious strain of mildew (many growers even in other regions noticed that particularity that year).
    __ Hysope 2017, a multi-varietal blend with Grenache, Mourvèdre, Carignan, Cinsault. Wines without so2 here always. Coffee aromas, Mokka, super interesting. Darker wine.

    Other tasting tables François Blanchard

    Here again like last year I stumble upon François Blanchard my story is getting pretty old now...], who is a coorganizer of the event, sitting at a table, having oysters and some good wine with friends. We chgatted a bit, he told me to stop at his table to taste more but he wasn't at his table or anywhere to be found when I looked for him, so here's the only wine from him I tasted :
    __ A Table 2022, a macerated white, this wine is still in its élevage stage (in barrel), it's been through a month-long maceration of berries. very aromatic vintage, lovely ! He says he has plenty other trials in different tanks, he'll show them probably at the Salon des Vins Sains on friday february 4th at Baptiste Cousin, not to miss if you're near Angers at that time.

    Clos Kixhaya

    I think it's François Blanchard who presented me this couple behind Clos Kixhava, Beatriz (born in Colombia) and Etienne, who make wine in the Chinon area, 2020 was their 1st vintage. They work on 4 hectares, only planted with Cabernet Franc, with an average vine age of 30 years but some of the parcels are 90 years old. See their Instagram account.
    __ Pet from 100 % Cabernet Franc. I've trouble reading my notes here, sorry.
    __ Blanc de Noir, Vin de France, Cabernet Franc 2020, a Cabernet picked under maturity and pressed with a basket press the same morning in one hour, a short-enough time so that there's no color at all, it's really a white wine (and it's not the so2 that cleared the color here, there is none). Stayed 6 months in barrel. Neat wine, exciting to drink a white Cabernet Franc.
    __ Les Grappes 2021, a red Cabernet Franc, very light color, looks like a rosé, made through a 5-day maceration with whole-clustered grapes. 14 €. Super nice wine, very feminine, lovely, whole and alive ! Bottled in june 2022, they made 3000 bottles of this, it was the first time they were pouring it.
    __ Les Grappes Cabernet Franc 2020, a 10-day maceration here, all done by gravity, bottled summer 2021. Nice color, somehow evolved toward tile. Leather notes, with mokka and sweet spices quite powerful. 12% alc. 14 €.
    __ Le Clos 2020, made from the oldest vines. Maceration of 40 days, destemmed by hand, it's rather like an infusion, with only light remontages, then a 24-hour press length. 12 months in barrels plus one year in bottles. Super mouth ! 18 €.

    Romuald Valot and his wife

    Romuald Valot makes wine in the Beaujolais since 2013, his vineyard surface is 10 hectares.
    __ Chrysalide Beaujolais Villages 2022, super exciting turbid color, and lovingly light as well. Bottled as Vin de France if I'm right. Very enjoyable red for only 10 € tax included. Traditional maceration, no pigeage, no foulage, no remontage [pumping over]. They made 35 hectoliters of this.
    __ Electron Libre 2020, Beaujolais Villages Gamay from a 110-year-old parcel. Magnificent mouth and palate. In 2020 they made no spraying at all in the vineyard. Really a wine to grab if you see some. 12 € tax included.
    __ Qui l'eut cru 2021, a blend of Gamay from Chiroubles and Chenas because the yields were so low that year. Light color also here.
    __ Cuvée 21150 Vin de France (21150 is their ZIP code). Pinot Noir plus 10 % of Gamay, it's a 2021. Blended also because of meager volumes, light color, turbidity, not much extraction. Vinified like a Gamay. 15 €. He says in 2022 the volumes aren't big but the quality is promising.

    Jean-Yves Bardin

    I met Jean-Yves Bardin, a photographer who was presenting his last book on the Loire vignerons, nature, organic and biodynamic, lots of nice pictures of people you certainly love the wines of. The book sells for 40 € at Amazon or the FNAC but online bookstores keep 50 % of the money and you can thus instead order directly from him for the same price (contact : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.). His website where you can see his pictures is thewinearchiviste.com

    This was in another corner of Ground Control
  • Need a Holiday Host Gift? Look No Further Than These 6 Wines
    04 December 2022

    The holidays are here and that means party time! The Wine365 Cru loves to host and entertain, and when we’re invited to a holiday gathering, these are some of our favorite go-to bottles to bring as the holiday host gift.

    6 Wines for the Perfect Holiday Host Gift Unexpected Sparkling Wine from Argentina:

    I’ll be bringing an Alta Vista Brut Rosé of Malbec to the next holiday party. It’s almost unbelievable that it’s Charmat method and not traditional—the bubbles are perfect! It’s a crowd-pleaser with lots of cherry and cherry blossom on the nose. Plus, I like to bring something unexpected, and not many people have tried such a stunning sparkling wine from Argentina. – Diana Zahuranec

    The Seafood Lover’s Favorite Falanghina:

    Villa Matilde Falanghina is a hostess gift that is sure to make a statement with the seafood lovers in your life. Growing up in a coastal town left my family with a love for mussels and clams—linguine alle vongole is a household favorite—which makes Falanghina the perfect addition to family dinners. – Mackenzie Lesher

    Easy-Sippin’ Pinot Grigio:

    I love bringing The Seeker Wines to my friends’ get-togethers and parties! This affordable, global wine brand allows novice consumers to taste wines from around the world without breaking the bank. The easy-sippin’ Seeker Pinot Grigio pairs best with light, fresh food (think appetizers, seared scallops, seasonal salads, pasta primavera, and chicken piccata). So, if you’re ordering sushi for a casual night-in with pals or putting together a Pinterest-inspired cheeseboard for a classy soirée, The Seeker Pinot Grigio has you covered. – Jillian Lepore

    Everyone’s Best Friend, Barbera:

    You know the person who seems to get along with everyone? That’s Barbera—one of the friendliest red wines you’ll ever meet. Michele Chiarlo Barbera d’Asti Le Orme has juicy, bright berry flavors to please most palates and just the right amount of structure to stand up to nearly any dish. – Joe Janish

    Spreading Good Cheer with Lambrusco:

    If flying solo this holiday season and want to make a lasting impression, bring a bottle of Medici Ermete Solo Reggiano Rosso DOC. This deep ruby red sparkling Lambrusco is a perfect companion for charcuterie boards and turkeys alike, so pop a bottle and spread some good taste and cheer all around you! – Vesselina Stoyanova

    The Right Way to End the Meal, with Bubbles:

    Medici Ermete Quercioli Dolce wine is a fantastic bottle to bring to host and hostess! This sweet, sparkling red wine is pairs deliciously well with spicy, savory dishes, or desserts. I enjoy baking, especially during the holiday season, so having the right bottle of wine to open at the end of a meal is very important. This sweet Lambrusco adds a bit of sparkle at the end of a special evening. – Jennica Ossi

    Become everyone’s favorite holiday party guest and pick up this delicious Holiday Hostess Wine pack in our Wine 365 Shop. Don’t forget to toast your host, and happy holidays!

    The Hostess Pack from the Wine365 Shop

    The post Need a Holiday Host Gift? Look No Further Than These 6 Wines appeared first on Wine 365.

  • Tawse Growers Blend Cabernet Franc 2019
    04 December 2022

    When you want to splurge a bit and get a spot on varietal example of what Niagara can do you can’t go wrong with Tawse Growers blends, both the Pinot and Cab Franc are yummy … Dark in color with a lovely cherry nose. On the mid palate the wine delivers with beautiful rich black cherries, some dark chocolate and mocha notes. On the medium length finish the wine packs a punch with firm tannins, vibrant acidity and lots of peppery notes. The flavors coat the palate beautifully and linger, a perfect steak wine! Yumm … I would give it an 88+, but if your looking for a smooth soft elegant wine, ya this SO ISN’T that … Big and bold! From the LCBO web site, check stock:

    $29.95VINTAGES#:284570

    Product Details

    Each Niagara vintage lends predication and predisposed possibility to any number of grape varieties and for Tawse it is 2019 that really speaks to cabernet franc. Not exactly in a top, top fruit quality, get ambitious and be generous with wood kind of year. More like a transparent, solid fruit substance and let the varietal ability speak in clear vernacular, is what it is, honest and pure. That’s the case with Grower’s Blend 2019, a franc of great clarity and modesty. From growth through upbringing and towards a long, transparent and highly cognizant life. Those who know will appreciate the herbaceous, crisp and crunchy flavours of this handsome wine. Drink date: 2021-2025. Tasted November 2021. Score – 92. (Michael Godel, winealign.com)

    Read More

    • VQA Wines
    • Made In Ontario
    More Details
    • Release Date September 10, 2022
    • Alcohol/Vol 13%
    • Made In Ontario, Canada
    • By Tawse
    • Sugar Content 3 g/L
    • Varietal Cabernet Franc

  • Château Coufran 2009 (Bordeaux) - Wine Review
    04 December 2022
    Tonight's wine review is an excellent, maturing red wine from Bordeaux that is featured on the cover of today's December 3 LCBO VINTAGES Release. This wine is also part of the theme of the release which is titled "Gifts to Celebrate: Festive, Food-Friendly Wines" and would make a fine gift for the holidays.

    The story of Château Coufran begins with 18th century archives that referred to it as the noble house of "Cousran", as well as the dovecote that dates back even further to the Ancien Régime. The Château has changed families many times over the years. One of the notable exchanges occurred after the revolution, when Jean-Valère Cabarrus, a ship-owner and wine merchant who already owned other prestigious wine estates, acquired Château Couffran. At the end of the 19th century, the Château changed families again when the Célérier family, wine merchants in Bordeaux, took advantage of the success of Bordeaux wines and invested in the Médoc wine region and purchased Couffran.

    In 1924, Louis Miailhe acquired the Château and decided on the current spelling of "Coufran". Louis undertook major redevelopment work in the vineyard, including planting mainly Merlot, which was more charming and highly appreciated at the time. The Miailhe family were wine brokers in France dating back to the 19th century and continued to 1970. Winemaking was also in the family with Louis' son, Jean, the winemaker at Coufran for a period of time. Since the 1980's, Jean's two children - Marie Cécile Vicaire and Eric Miailhe - have taken over. The wines of Coufran are atypical for the Médoc region, with a journalist once calling Coufran the "Pomerol of Médoc" due to their Merlot-based wines.

    Château Coufran is located in the Haut-Médoc appellation in Saint-Seurin-de-Cadourne, a town just north of neighbouring Saint-Estèphe in the Pauillac area. Although the Château is located on the Left Bank of Bordeaux, where wines are usually blends of predominantly Cabernet Sauvignon, this red wine is crafted with 85% Merlot and 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, with vines averaging 45-years-old. Château Coufran is a single 76-hectare block that stretches across a hillside, with its highest point at 21 metres elevation, and the soils are primarily made up of gravel and clay.

    In the vineyard, vegetation cover is encouraged between rows, and the leaves are thinned after flowering. Grape bunches are also thinned, allowing the fruit to ripen in the best possible conditions. Harvest is carried out selectively, starting with Merlot, and then moving on to Cabernet. The grapes are also sorted based on quality and according to the terroir and vine age. It was vinified using traditional Bordeaux techniques, in temperature-controlled stainless-steel tanks. The wine was matured in French oak barrels for 12 months, with a quarter of the barrels replaced with new barrels each year. After bottling, the wine is stored on-site in an air-conditioned room to optimise the ageing process, allowing them to release the ready-to-drink wines. From the legendary 2009 vintage, let's see how this Bordeaux red wine is tasting tonight...


    Tasting Note: CHÂTEAU COUFRAN 2009 - AC Haut-Médoc, Bordeaux, France (#13399) (XD) - $37.95
    Blend of 85% Merlot and 15% Cabernet Sauvignon from vines averaging 45-years-old. Lovely, complex, elegant, and very attractive nose has medium-high intensity aromatics of crushed and stewed dark berry, black cherry, sweet spices, wet earth, olive, and sandalwood. It's medium-full to full-bodied with complex and maturing flavours of dark berry, black cherry, sweet spices, earth, currant, and cassis on the palate. Acids are still quite juicy and refreshing. Some dried cherry and floral notes on the mid-palate add further interest. Maturing tannins are structured, refined, and somewhat grippy-chalky, with a pleasing mouthfeel. Earthy with black cherry, olive, and sweet spice notes linger on the long, satisfying finish. In a nice place right now and should continue to drink well over the next 5 years, maybe longer. Highly recommended buy! Score: 92+ pts

    Other lovely wines by Château Coufran can be ordered through their Agent - Connexion Oenophilia.
  • Thibaud Boudignon Rosé de Loire
    04 December 2022

     Rosé does not make it often on lists of serious high quality wines, but the 2020 Thibaud Boudignon Rosé de Loire should be there. It stood out in a recent tasting of about 30 Rosés.


    The grape composition is not entirely clear, but it is roughly 90% Cabernet Franc and 10% of a white wine variety, either Chenin Blanc or Grolleau. The regime is biodynamic. The wine is directly pressed and vinified like a white wine, with indigenous yeast.

    This wine has a light apricot orange colour, not as pale as Rosés from Provence. The flavours are apricot and yellow peach. This is a bone dry wine of great purity. It is flavoursome, quite linear with a firm structure and a long finish.

    Score: 92/+++ 


  • Perfect Holiday Gifts for the Winelovers and Foodies in Your Life
    04 December 2022

    It’s holiday season (again) and if you haven’t already chosen the perfect gifts for the food and wine lovers in your life, I have a few ideas (received as samples) they’ll love. Each is special in its own way and is guaranteed to delight. Truth be told, I’ve read and used each book, played SOMM Blinders game many times and already have plans to visit the Loire with the expertise of Elite Wine Tours. Enjoy!

    Supper by Flora Shedden Celebrates Every Meal with Elegance

    “Supper, Dinner, Tea, Feast… Frankly, who cares what you call it? We all end our day with a meal,” writes author Flora Shedden in her introduction to Supper. This beautiful book stuns with striking photography and mouthwatering recipes that inspire. Chapters entitled “In a hurry,” “Thirty-minute tea,” “Candlelight,” “On the side,” and “Sweet endings” offer creative ideas for the chef, no matter the skill level. Chapter Three suggests recipes for “Good things to drink (and eat!)” such as a Vodka Fizz, Basil Gimlet, Gooseberry and Tonic and other libations along with luscious food pairings. From a romantic evening to a weeknight meal, 100+ recipes deliver exactly what we need to make the end of the day very special indeed.

    Elegance and sophistication with sides of whimsy and deliciousness characterize this book, a chef’s dream. Pour your favorite wine, start cooking and enjoy the experience. Cost is $32.50 on Amazon.

    The Wine Bible, Third Edition is the Go-To Book for Wine Lovers

    I was thrilled to receive The Wine Bible, Third Edition, from iconic speaker and knowledgeable author, Karen MacNeil. With its interesting, entertaining prose that considers wine as “one of the last true things” (in MacNeil’s words), this is a book you can easily read from beginning to end or in bits and pieces.

    You’ll learn from interesting sidebars (The Famous Prosciutto of Friuli, for example), relevant sections (The Wine Bible Word Dictionary), detailed tasting notes, wine suggestions, anecdotes, tips, definitions, illustrations, photographs and more. Peruse The Wine Bible when you are ready to travel to your favorite wine destination, when you are searching for a special bottle to purchase, or when you would simply love to read a fascinating book that weaves wine with food, culture, history and landscape. This is everyone’s go-to book about the fundamentals of wine and so much more. Available on Amazon, cost is $35.99 for the paperback version –click here to order.

    Test Your Blind Tasting Skills with SOMM Blinders Game

    Just when you thought the holidays couldn’t be more fun, it truly is when you play SOMM Blinders Game with friends and family. I can honestly say that this card game has upped my blind tasting skills which, to be honest, have never been what they should. Tasting wine “blind” is tough and although I’m reasonably good at identifying aromas and flavors of a wine, determining the variety correctly can be a challenge. Now, with SOMM Blinders Game, blind tasting is not at all intimidating.

    I’ve been playing with the Original Deck that includes red and white wines. The deck has 107 cards that include taste descriptors, cards for high or low acidity, high or low tannins, with or without oak, regions and grape varieties. The white wines to play with in the Original Deck are Pinot Grigio from Italy, Sauvignon Blanc, Oaked Chardonnay and Unoaked Chardonnay (or Chablis). Red wines are California Cabernet, Bordeaux, Beaujolais and California Pinot Noir. (Other decks focus specifically on red wines and white wines – each deck covers six wines.)

    Cost for SOMM Blinders Game is $35 but if you use discount code GRAPEXP, enjoy a 20% discount. Please click here to order!

    Travel to the Loire Valley with Elite Wine Tour

    Chris Garry is Tour Coordinator for Elite Wine Tour, a company that provides luxury bespoke, custom client-led wine experiences across the Loire Valley. We can choose from 12 diverse Loire regions and tours are half, full, and/or multi-day tours. Whether you prefer dry whites, rich reds or something bubbly, we’ll find in the Loire Valley exactly what we’re looking for… and more! Each tour is completely unique, tailored to our specific tastes and needs and designed to surpass all expectations. I’m definitely on board for traveling to the Loire with Elite Wine Tour – this truly is an amazing gift for anyone who loves traveling for wine!

    To experience the Loire Valley in all its glory and for 20% off all bookings, use coupon code GRAPEXP20 at checkout. Click here to view your options and book your experiences. See you there!

    Cheers! ~ Cindy

    If you have time for another gift idea (wine! cheese! gorgeous cutting board!), enjoy “Entertain California-Style with Raeburn Winery Chardonnay and Pinot Noir Paired with Sonoma County Cheeses.” Please click here.

     

    The post Perfect Holiday Gifts for the Winelovers and Foodies in Your Life appeared first on Grape Experiences.

  • 04 December 2022
    How to Play a Slot Machine online

    The first rule of playing a slot casinos that accept revolut machine online is to play only with the money you’ve won. There are different ways to increase your winnings, and some have multipliers that increase wins by a certain amount. In the same way, an increase of 2X will mean that you’ve won 30X your stake! To keep winning on a slot machine, you need to feed it with coins only before the winnings are paid.

    In addition, a lot of free slots sites allow you to play slots without the need to sign up. These sites do not charge any fees to play and you can play for no money. You’ll also find some great slot games that provide a free version of the game. These sites don’t require you deposit a minimum amount or sign up to their site before you can play with real money. If you win a prize, some sites will offer you a bonus.

    Understanding how the machines work is the first step towards becoming a skilled slot player. Each slot machine has its own rules. For example, you can make use of the Wild symbol to substitute for any other symbol in the game. If you can land three of these symbols in a row, you’ve won. The Scatter symbol, however, is the scatter symbol that can replace any other symbol on the reels. This combination is usually enough to win you the game.

    Remembering the purpose of your slot game is another important step to take when playing. While the social aspect of slot machines is enjoyable, you should not play for the money. Keep in mind that you’re putting your pocket money on the probability that you’ll be successful. Have fun placing your bets! Remember that the goal of the game, just as with all gambling is to have fun. Sometimes it’s social. This means that you might be able to connect with other players.

    If you’d like to try the game with cash play a demo version. This way, you’ll assess the slot machine’s risk and determine if it’s right for you. The free version is for those who cannot afford real money. The difference between real money and free versions is minimal. You can play a slot machine online and try it out for yourself. It’s simple and enjoyable to learn how to play.

    The rules of slot machines usually explain how to play the game, as well as how much you can bet. Modern slot machines let you activate as many paylines you like. Activate all the paylines so you’ll be able to view the results immediately. It is not advisable to gamble with real money. The volatility of the game determines your chances of winning. The slot will stop spinning if it has too many symbols that are volatile.

    Online versions of traditional slots are more advanced than their physical counterparts. The Random Number Generator (RNG) in the online slot machine guarantees that the outcomes of every spin are totally random. The results of previous spins do not affect the results of the following spin. It is safe to gamble the winnings. You can also earn money by winning real money. You can also play slots online if you aren’t sure about the risk.

    Matching symbols left to right is the most effective method to win on online slot machines. A coin can earn you up to 1,000 coins. The odds are based on the amount of symbols you match, but a jackpot that’s more than 1,000 coins can be quite lucrative! Although it’s an easy game to play it is worth noting that the So Hot logo symbol is one of the highest-paying symbols in the game. Slot machines online provide a myriad of benefits.

    The jurisdiction of the casino zimpler online casinos determines the maximum number of lines that are able to be wagered online using the machine. While certain countries have limitations, the most popular games allow players to bet on all lines. This makes it easier to make more money by playing more frequently. It is important to find the most effective online slots. If you’re playing in Europe You’ll need to select a slot that allows players to bet on all of their lines.

    The post appeared first on We The People Wine.

  • 04 December 2022
    How to Play a Slot Machine online

    The first rule of playing a slot casinos that accept revolut machine online is to play only with the money you’ve won. There are different ways to increase your winnings, and some have multipliers that increase wins by a certain amount. In the same way, an increase of 2X will mean that you’ve won 30X your stake! To keep winning on a slot machine, you need to feed it with coins only before the winnings are paid.

    In addition, a lot of free slots sites allow you to play slots without the need to sign up. These sites do not charge any fees to play and you can play for no money. You’ll also find some great slot games that provide a free version of the game. These sites don’t require you deposit a minimum amount or sign up to their site before you can play with real money. If you win a prize, some sites will offer you a bonus.

    Understanding how the machines work is the first step towards becoming a skilled slot player. Each slot machine has its own rules. For example, you can make use of the Wild symbol to substitute for any other symbol in the game. If you can land three of these symbols in a row, you’ve won. The Scatter symbol, however, is the scatter symbol that can replace any other symbol on the reels. This combination is usually enough to win you the game.

    Remembering the purpose of your slot game is another important step to take when playing. While the social aspect of slot machines is enjoyable, you should not play for the money. Keep in mind that you’re putting your pocket money on the probability that you’ll be successful. Have fun placing your bets! Remember that the goal of the game, just as with all gambling is to have fun. Sometimes it’s social. This means that you might be able to connect with other players.

    If you’d like to try the game with cash play a demo version. This way, you’ll assess the slot machine’s risk and determine if it’s right for you. The free version is for those who cannot afford real money. The difference between real money and free versions is minimal. You can play a slot machine online and try it out for yourself. It’s simple and enjoyable to learn how to play.

    The rules of slot machines usually explain how to play the game, as well as how much you can bet. Modern slot machines let you activate as many paylines you like. Activate all the paylines so you’ll be able to view the results immediately. It is not advisable to gamble with real money. The volatility of the game determines your chances of winning. The slot will stop spinning if it has too many symbols that are volatile.

    Online versions of traditional slots are more advanced than their physical counterparts. The Random Number Generator (RNG) in the online slot machine guarantees that the outcomes of every spin are totally random. The results of previous spins do not affect the results of the following spin. It is safe to gamble the winnings. You can also earn money by winning real money. You can also play slots online if you aren’t sure about the risk.

    Matching symbols left to right is the most effective method to win on online slot machines. A coin can earn you up to 1,000 coins. The odds are based on the amount of symbols you match, but a jackpot that’s more than 1,000 coins can be quite lucrative! Although it’s an easy game to play it is worth noting that the So Hot logo symbol is one of the highest-paying symbols in the game. Slot machines online provide a myriad of benefits.

    The jurisdiction of the casino zimpler online casinos determines the maximum number of lines that are able to be wagered online using the machine. While certain countries have limitations, the most popular games allow players to bet on all lines. This makes it easier to make more money by playing more frequently. It is important to find the most effective online slots. If you’re playing in Europe You’ll need to select a slot that allows players to bet on all of their lines.

    The post appeared first on We The People Wine.

Wine Podcasts

Wine Podcasts

04 December 2022

Wine Podcasts Wine Podcasts
  • Introducing the WSET Level 4 Wine Course with Lauren Denyer
    03 December 2022
    An overview of the WSET L4 Award in Wines, the students who embark on this Diploma level wine course and what it covers.
  • Ep. 1184 VIA Taormina Gourmet & Mt. Etna 2022 Pt. 5| Gita Scolastica 2022
    03 December 2022
    Welcome to Episode 1166 in which Cynthia Chaplin narrates her adventures in Sicily during the VIA Taormina Gourmet & Mt. Etna 2022 Gita Scolastica 2022 - this episode is part 5 of 6. More about today’s show: This is a special Vinitaly International Academy, 2022, Taormina Gourmet and Mt. Etna Gita Scolastica series. The last week of October took a team of our staff and 15 Vinitaly International Academy Ambassadors to the annual Taormina Gourmet event hosted by Cronache di Gusto, and then on to explore several vineyards and wines of Mt Etna. Of course, the whole experience was documented! Listen in as Cynthia Chaplin narrates her travel adventures - and remember, if you prefer written content, you can find this blog on Italianwinepodcast.com, now onto the show To learn more visit: vinitalyinternational.com/ About today’s Host: Cynthia Chaplin is a VIA certified Italian Wine Ambassador, a professional sommelier with FIS and the WSA, a member of Le Donne del Vino, and a Professor of Italian wine and culture. Born in the USA, she’s lived in Europe since 1990. Italian wine, in particular rosé, is her passion. She works with embassies, corporations and private clients, creating and presenting tastings, events, seminars and in-depth courses. Cynthia is a wine writer, a judge at international wine and sake competitions, she consults with restaurants and enotecas developing comprehensive wine lists and food pairings, and she advises clients who want to curate an Italian wine collection. She currently works for Vinitaly International in Verona as a Project Manager, Educator, and the host of VOICES Series on The Italian Wine Podcast, focusing on diversity and inclusion in the global wine industry. To learn more visit: Facebook: Italian Wines in English Instagram: kiss_my_glassx Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/cynthia-chaplin-190647179/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!
  • Ep 475: Serbian natural wine, Raphael Dayan, Organski Podrum, Belgrade Serbia Special
    03 December 2022

    I’m Lawrence Francis, Host of Interpreting Wine, welcoming you to a special episode recorded in June 2022, with Raphael Dayan, co-owner of Organski Podrum in Belgrade Serbia.

    Organski Podrum is a natural wine temple designed to show the diversity and quality of mainly Serbian and some international natural wines. 

     

    00:00:08 Intro

    00:01:21 Origin Story

    00:10:03 Belgrade cultural introduction

    00:15:20 Wine culture

    00:26:25 Natural wine producers according to Organski Podrum wine list: Oskar Maurer, Sagmeister, Basha, Moritz Bor, Winery Vujic, Winery Kostic, Todorovic, Bikicki

    00:38:52 Wines tasted:

    1. Sagmeister Q Furmint 2018
    2. Maurer Fodor 2020
    3. Sagmeister Kadarka 2020
    4. Vujic Prokupac
    5. Kostic Prokupac

    If you know someone who would enjoy this episode please share the direct link: www.interpretingwine.com/475

    If you really enjoyed it please leave the episode an iTunes review on the same link. Thanks! ??

    Intro and outro musicThe New Investorshttp://newinvestors.dk/Contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    GUEST CONTACT: Raphael Dayan, Organski Podrum

    https://www.organskipodrum.com/

    Date recorded: 30 Jun 2022

    Listen and subscribe: www.interpretingwine.com 

    CONTACT ME:

    Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

     

    Wine Marketing Roundtable: https://www.interpretingwine.com/roundtable

    Instagram: https://www.interpretingwine.com/instagram

    Facebook: https://www.interpretingwine.com/facebook

    Twitter: https://www.interpretingwine.com/twitter

    Linkedin: https://www.interpretingwine.com/linkedin

    Clubhouse: https://www.interpretingwine.com/clubhouse

    Youtube: www.interpretingwine.com/youtube

     

    Direct listen link

    www.interpretingwine.com/475

     

  • The Wine Makers – The White Elephant Show
    02 December 2022

    This week on the podcast, our friend James Joiner puts us through a blind tasting of “gimmick” and celebrity wines.
    Those wines that your family brings to a holiday gathering and you subtly groan as you open the bag. Snoop Dogg, Martha Stewart, Game of Thrones and Hello Kitty among others are in the lineup. You have never heard such a mixture of glee and disgust in your life. We rate all of the wines separately then compare notes, you won’t believe the results. We hope you enjoy the show and aren’t too offended. Happy Holidays [EP257]

  • Ep. 1182 Susannah Gold Question | #everybodyneedsabitofscienza
    02 December 2022
    Welcome to Episode 1182, where the professore takes questions from the wine community and answers them in his inimitable way! These shows are generally in the Italian language. Today’s question comes from Susannah Gold. If you want to learn more about the Professore: The one who checks all the facts and regulates when we mistakenly type "Verdicchio" in place of "Vermentino.” Attilio Scienza is a full professor at the University of Milan in the Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences where he teaches courses on genetic improvements to the vine; he also teaches Viticulture in the Master’s program of the University of Turin in Asti. He has been the lead for many national research projects in the field of physiology, agricultural techniques, and vine genetics. As the author of over 350 publications on vine and viticulture in national and international journals, you can bet he knows his stuff! To find out more about Attilio Scienza visit: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/via-faqs/ winenews.it/en/an-italian-profe…l-be-one-of_307764/ If you want to learn more about Stevie Kim, the Scienza wrangler: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!
  • 12-01-2022 All About Wine is LIVE! w/Ron - with Guest: Kala Maxym of Five Senses Tastings
    02 December 2022
    Tonight, we welcome Kala Maxym of Five Senses Tastings! Hosted by Ron since 2009.  Wine maker, cellar master, vineyardist and tasting expert, Ron, makes wine less confusing and more fun.  Learn something new each week during the show. We are always looking for guests to talk about their winery, vineyard, wine-related product, enology, horticulture and more.  Visit our website for details on how to "be a guest". Tune in via our BlogTalkRadio Page, our Facebook page, Twitter, YouTube and Mixcloud!  
  • Chris Taddei Owner and Wine Maker of Taddei Wines
    01 December 2022

    Wine Road Podcast Episode 163

    Sponsored by Ron Rubin Winery

    Episode 163 | Chris Taddei Owner and Wine Maker of Taddei Wines.

    Chris Taddei of Taddei wines joins us to tell us about his winemaking philosophy and how he got into making wine. He shares his Project X, 2018 Cabernet Sauvignon from Alexander Valley. Our Fast Five Recipe is Lamb Chops with Blue Cheese Compound Butter from Julius Orth from Ektimo.

    Wine of the Day: Taddei Project X, 2018 Cabernet Sauvignon, Alexander Valley Fast Five Recipe: Lamb Chops with Blue Cheese Compound Butter from Julius Orth from Ektimo. Podcast Sponsor: Ron Rubin Winery

    https://ronrubinwinery.com/

    SHOW NOTES

    1:04 Starting off with 2018 Taddei Cabernet Sauvignon from Alexander Valley (Project X) But Chris brought a whole case of wines to try!

    3:00 Chris’s tasting room philosophy is he wants people to understand who he is and what he does through his wine. He will open anything you are interested in.

    5:08 Wine is a slow beverage. The learning experience is a part of the wine tasting experience. And his vertical tastings are a rare treat.

    7:10 How Chris came to be a winemaker, his wine epiphany with a bottle of La Tâche, and how he met his wife.

    10:53 Chris started the winery in 2003 and made first wine in 1999. Self taught in winemaking with a background in chemistry. Chris Makes wine with intention and deliberateness.

    17:38 Fast Five Recipe –Lamb Chops with Blue Cheese Compound Butter from Julius Orth from Ektimo.

    Ingredients: Rack of Lamb, Butter, and Blue Cheese.

    Directions: Separate the chops from the rack of lamb and trim off fat. Put olive oil on the chops and sear on a hot grill about 2 minutes. In advance create the Blue cheese compound butter. Crumble the blue cheese into softened butter. Mix well and roll into a tube in wax paper. Put in refrigerator to chill. Cut a medallion of the lamb chop and slater with the butter. Serve with a roasted root vegetable medley. Pair with Ektimo Pinot Noir

    21:05 Chris will also take guests through barrel samples too. Open by appointment only but Chris is always there at the Bell Road location.

    25:42 Tickets are now available on wineroad.com for Winter WineLand January 14 & 15 with 70 wineries participating. Also check out the Insider Club -- link on the website with all the details. Fill your bag with wine and tag with #mywineroadadventure

    Links:

    Taddei Wines

    Ektimo Wines

    WinterWineLand

    Wine Road Insider Club

    Ron Rubin Winery

    Credits:The Wine Road podcast is mixed and mastered at Threshold Studios Sebastopol, CA.

    http://thresholdstudios.info/

  • Episode 65: Douglas Danielak, Pont Neuf/Juicy Rebound Wines
    01 December 2022

    I always love talking wine and also my childhood love of hockey. We get to do both as we welcome Winemaker extraordinaire, Douglas Danielak, of Pont Neuf and Juicy Rebound wines on this weeks Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast. He has a hockey name and Danielak was an earlier trailblazer for Californian Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. 

    Don't forget to Subscribe, Rate and Review! Please please It only takes a few minutes and helps me/the show grow. The more subscribers, reviews and rates helps us to get discovered! Also, follow us on our Facebook @corkandtaylor and Instagram accounts @corkandtaylorpodcast.

    Also, Please consider supporting the show as it would be appreciated. This helps me offset  expenses to continue to run and grow the Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast. Thanks! Luke

    https://www.patreon.com/corkandtaylor

  • Follow your passion says Paige Comrie. She did and became a serious wine influencer.
    01 December 2022
    Wine influencers are a thing. They are passionate about wine and know how to tell the stories. Paige Comrie is a classic example. Having been a XXXXXX, she learned of the “lifestyle” of wine and it was “Katie bar the door”. With both guns drawn, Paige set out to share her passion of wine through photography in the Napa Valley. Originally for no charge, she began re-imagining the social presence of Napa wineries. Thus a career was born. Now she not only handles social networking and photography for wineries and her own blog, she has created an on-line class on how to become a wine influencer (yes, you can become a wine influencer.)   Have a listen, you will be inspired and intrigued.
  • Ep. 1180 Sheila Donohue Interviews Antonella Manuli | Clubhouse Ambassador's Corner
    01 December 2022
    Welcome to Episode 1180 Stevie Kim moderates Clubhouse’s Ambassadors Corner – In this episode Sheila Donohue interviews Antonella Manuli. These sessions are recorded from Clubhouse and replayed here on the Italian Wine Podcast! Listen in on this series as Italian Wine Ambassadors all over the world chat with Stevie and their chosen wine producer. Which producer would you interview if you had your pick? Guest-Moderator Sheila Donohue - VeroVino Founder, CEO, and Sommelier is a New Yorker who has been living in Italy for 20 years. After becoming a sommelier and getting to know hundreds of smaller producers with great tasting authentic products, but mainly unknown around the US, she decided to start 'spreading the love' by bringing these hidden gems from anywhere in the world direct to people who want to explore and experience more out of wine, food and life. To learn more visit: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/verovinogusto Instagram verovinogusto Twitter verovinogusto LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/sheiladonohue/ Website https://www.verovinogusto.com/our-story About today’s guest producer: Antonella Manuli is an entrepreneur who grew up in Italy, Switzerland and the United States, she finishes her university studies in California, where she meets and shares the values of the Organic Movement. In Italy she worked in the field of auditing and finance, before arriving in the Tuscan Maremma and following the Terme di Saturnia Spa Resort. In the meantime, falling in love with the territory and its original environmental, historical and landscape characteristics, she searches for the land that today makes up the biodynamic Fattoria La Maliosa which produces natural wines, extra virgin olive oil and honey. With the agronomist and researcher Lorenzo Corino, they developed the wine project, consolidating and growing together with him highly innovative agronomic techniques for an ever greater sustainability of wine and olive production, now codified with the name of CORINO METHOD. She collaborates with Lorenzo Corino in numerous cultural dissemination and training projects. She was editor of Corino's book “The Essence of wine and natural viticulture” and co-author of the essay “Vegetable biodynamics, the future of natural wine”, published by the Fondazione Istud – Mondadori Università. She is a teacher and speaker at numerous courses and conferences at national and international level, dedicated to the theme of sustainability in the world of wine and agriculture. To learn more visit: Facebook https://www.facebook.com/LaMaliosa Instagram lamaliosa Twitter fattorialamaliosa LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/antonellamanuli/ Website https://fattorialamaliosa.it/ More about the moderator Stevie Kim: Stevie hosts Clubhouse sessions each week (visit Italian Wine Club & Wine Business on Clubhouse), these recorded sessions are then released on the podcast to immortalize them! She often also joins Professor Scienza in his shows to lend a hand keeping our Professor in check! You can also find her taking a hit for the team when she goes “On the Road”, all over the Italian countryside, visiting wineries and interviewing producers, enjoying their best food and wine – all in the name of bringing us great Pods! To find out more about Stevie Kim visit: Facebook: @steviekim222 Instagram: @steviekim222 Website: https://vinitalyinternational.com/wordpress/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/
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