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Australian Wine Blogs

Australian Wine Blogs

20 June 2021

Australian Wine Blogs Australian Wine Blogs
  • The Hill of Corton, White Wines
    20 June 2021

     Burgundy is widely regarded as the most complex wine region in the world. However, all you have to initially understand are three principles about its structure. One, it is vineyard based (as opposed to winery based). Two, there are distinct subregions, displaying quite distinct characteristics. Three, there is a hierarchy of wines, starting from grand cru and going down. What makes it complicated for non French people is the labelling, but let us just ignore this here.

    However, within Burgundy, there is one region which is really complicated, and this is the Hill of Corton. The following map shows its terroir. As can be seen, vineyards can point in all directions other than North. There are also major differences in altitude.

             

    Corton is the largest grand cru area in Burgundy. The white wines are mostly labelled Corton-Charlemagne. I will review three of those wines here. The first is the 2010 Louis Jadot Domaine des Héritiers Corton-Charlemagne.


    Louis Jadot has a negociant business with varying quality. This wine, from a south facing owned vineyard, is excellent. It has the hallmarks of a white grand cru: good fruit weight, good length, and power. Yet it starts with a fragrant nose, but then builds on the palate via intense fruit flavours and minerality to a lasting finish.

    Score: 95/+++

    The second wine, the 2012 Henri Boillot Corton-Charlemagne, is vastly different.


    This wine is two years younger, yet the colour is more advanced and golden. Primary fruit is not the prominent feature here any more. The flavours are creamy, with nougat and hazelnut on top of wet stone minerality. This wine has a big mouthfeel (like Meursault) and good intensity.

    Score: 94/+++

    The third wine is the 2015 Buisson-Charles Corton-Charlemagne. This wine is the total opposite to the last wine. This is a delicate wine, despite hailing from a very warm vintage. The colour is quite pale.
    Pineapple and passion fruit flavours dance lightly on the palate. The wine has good drive, but is perhaps a little thin on the back palate.

    Score: 93/++

    Conclusion: We have three wines here from the same subregion, yet they are totally different: the Jadot a grand cru classic, the Henri-Boillot a big and ripe wine, and the Buisson-Charles delicate and light. 

    Let me come back to my introduction. The Burgundy principles are not that hard, but the key to understand and appreciate it, is to understand the producer. If you had tasted one of these wines, and you thought you knew what Corton tastes like, you could not have been more wrong. And this is what makes the Hill of Corton particularly difficult. The range of expressions here is probably wider than anywhere else in Burgundy.  

      



        

  • World Atlas of Wine
    20 June 2021
    Vinodiversity's review of World Atlas of Wine, 7th edition by Hugh Johnson and Jancis Robinson
  • Yangarra Estate Roux Beaute Roussanne 2019
    20 June 2021

     



    Brilliance looks like this. A wonderfully layered Roussanne from Yangarra Estate.

    As with all Yangarra Estate wines, there is an incredible precision that goes into the making.

    50% is destemmed, crushed and filled to 675L ceramic eggs and fermented on skins for 96 days. The other 50% juice is pressed and fermented without skins in ceramic eggs with the final blend being 45% extended skin batch and 55% without skins.

    The wine delivers biscuity nuances, ginger, almonds, green tea and raw nuts. Licks of lemon and honeyed tones slide in later. A textural delight, it firms up in the mouth but then slowly loosens the noose. Superbly balanced, it just sings bringing all elements together in absolute harmony.

    Drink to five years+

    95/100

    Region: McLaren Vale
    RRP: $60
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 


  • Soul Growers Eden Valley Riesling 2021
    20 June 2021

     


    The first of the Barossa 2021s to arrive and all the talk of a super vintage hold true. Fresh as and screaming for sunshine and smiles, this Riesling is refreshing deluxe. Get in my belly material.

    Sourced from the Eden Valley, it is bursting with lemons and limes - come at me. A pretty perfume of bath salts and white flowers with talc-like feels through the mouth, that citrus goodness drives along with admirable persistence. Long lunch, summertime in the pool or just coz, this is a great Riesling.

    Drink now. 

    93/100

    Region: Barossa
    RRP: $28
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 


  • A fine Tasmanian fizz to celebrate Jansz’s first winery
    18 June 2021

    One of the single biggest growth hurdles that Tasmanian wine faces is a lack of wineries.

    I’m not talking about a shortfall of producers – Tassie has a whole smorgasbord of vineyards and makers. But there is a distinct lack of physical grape processing facilities. In fact, outside of Tas Vintners (which fell into administration just two years ago), the situation is so challenging that grapes (or must) are shipped to the mainland for fermentation/maturation.

    (more…)

    The post A fine Tasmanian fizz to celebrate Jansz’s first winery appeared first on Australian Wine Review.

  • Help guide a new wine and drinks community project and score a $20 gift voucher
    18 June 2021

    One of the (many) things I’m working on at the moment is the scoping and planning for a new wine community project backed by WINEDEPOT.

    It’s still very early days, and in a bid to get it right, the team have come up with a survey to gather feedback from people in the wine/drinks industry – and I’m happy to share.

    This survey should take no more than five minutes to complete. As thanks, you’ll receive a $20 Prezzee Smart eGift Card (valid at over 150 stores from The Iconic to The Apple Store) if you complete the survey by 23/06/21 (I’ve already completed mine!).

    Thanks for helping get this project right.

    Start HERE.

    The post Help guide a new wine and drinks community project and score a $20 gift voucher appeared first on Australian Wine Review.

  • Tellurian Redline Shiraz 2019
    18 June 2021

     

    A barbecue special. Personally, I'd go a hamburger. One of those trendy double smashies will do me just fine. A drink now Shiraz from Tellurian's now certified organic vineyards.

    Tell me you don't taste the red Cambrian earth in this wine? Quite pronounced, this savoury driven Shiraz shows dried herbs, sauteed mushrooms, black pepper and a generous wash of blackberry fruit. It's firm up and drives long and is a most enjoyable wine. Rock-solid and sure to please.

    Drink to three years.

    89/100

    Region: Heathcote
    RRP: $23
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 


  • Airlie Bank Sauvignon Blanc 2021
    18 June 2021

     


    If you are going to have a Sauvignon Blanc, make it one that has been barrel fermented - like this one. Fresh as, the fruit bursts from the glass. 

    Cut apple and passionfruit explode. There is some weight, a little creaminess plus a fine sheet of texture too. Quite cleansing and refreshing, this has plenty of crowd-pleasing appeal written all over it.

    Drink now.

    91/100

    Region: Yarra Valley
    RRP: $22
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 


  • Lagoon View Riesling Traminer 2018
    18 June 2021

     

    An easy drink to match spicy food.

    Think fresh-pressed green apples, musk and Turkish Delight. With a light spritz and kiss of sweetness on close, it goes okay.

    Drink now.

    87/100

    Region: Goulburn Valley
    RRP: $20
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 


  • Kurtz Family Seven Sleepers The Blend
    18 June 2021

    It’s been a while since I’ve had a red blend, and until recently I haven’t been having much Barossa wine either. But the Kurtz Family Seven Sleepers The Blend ticked all those boxes for me and more!

    This wine is a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Petit Verdot and Malbec all brought together into a taste sensation. It’s from 2017 so already has a couple of years on it making it perfect for enjoying now, or ageing for a bit if you can wait. My advice? Crack it open and enjoy!

    Seven Sleepers, or Siebenschlaffer, is named after an old Barossa German farmers’ lore, being that the weather that occurs on 27 June is likely to be prevalent for the next 7 weeks. The first wine destined for the Seven Sleepers range was a blend of 7 grape varieties from the 2004 vintage – hence the name!

    The wine is bright red in the glass and has a really fruit-driven nose – think blackcurrant, plum and blueberry. There was also a hint of chocolate and florals.

    On the palate, I loved how juicy and rich this wine was. It had lots of fruit at the front driven by plum, yet a smooth chocolatey finish and a great texture from just the right amount of tannin. I loved how much this wine lingered long after you took a sip – it was so satisfyingly rich.

    The Kurtz Family Seven Sleepers The Blend is a perfect food wine, and at $18 a bottle, you don’t need to think twice about cracking it open with anything from pizza to bringing it along to a BBQ.

    Find out more at the Kurtz Family Vineyards website now.

    The post Kurtz Family Seven Sleepers The Blend appeared first on The Cheeky Vino wine blog.

Wine Investment blogs

Wine Investment Blogs

20 June 2021

Wine Investment Blogs Wine Investment Blogs
  • Five QPR Names to Watch
    18 June 2021
  • ‘Investing in fine wine to diversify and de-risk your portfolio’ with What Investment
    16 June 2021

    Chairman and Founder of Vin-X, Peter Shakeshaft, discusses fine wine investment with What Investment to help those looking for an asset to outperform financial markets and commodities over the long term.

    ‘Investing in fine wine is both enjoyable and very rewarding, providing the opportunity to explore, understand and own some of the finest luxury products in the world. Fine wine’s historical performance has led many investors to view it as a tangible, alternative asset that can be used to diversify an investment portfolio, delivering stability and growth that can de-risk an investment strategy and protect wealth.’

    Click here to continue reading on What Investment. 

    The post ‘Investing in fine wine to diversify and de-risk your portfolio’ with What Investment appeared first on Vin-X.

  • Bordeaux EP Weekly Summary - 7th - 11th June
    14 June 2021
  • Fine Wine News Round Up 5 - 11 June
    14 June 2021
  • What is light strike and why is it a problem?
    14 June 2021
  • Château Canon – Right Bank Super Second
    11 June 2021
  • Cult En Primeur Collection series: Haut Brion and Pontet Canet are popular choices!
    11 June 2021
  • Can the top 10 performing 2019 Bordeaux wines guide investors in 2020 en primeurs?
    09 June 2021

    With Bordeaux 2020 en primeurs dominating market focus and the key First Growths still to release, we look at the performance of 2019 as a guide to investors in the latest vintage offering.

    Top three 2019 en primeurs in 1 year since release:
    • Chateau Lafleur 2019 – 106.9%
    • Chateau Petrus 2019 –  100.7%
    • Chateau Figeac 2019 –  65.3%

    This time last year the world was reeling under the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic, financial markets had experienced the most tumultuous period since 2008 and suffered the largest losses on record. In the midst of all this, the “wheels of the wine world” kept turning and the 2019 vintage release, surprised and delighted the market with discounts on the 2018 release of up to 30% by some of the most significant estates and 20% on average.

    It was not straight forward, Covid restrictions meant that samples had to be shipped to the key critics, scores were published later and the campaign delayed – but the result, a highly successful campaign with an engaged market.

    The secondary market trade on Liv-ex in 2019 En Primeurs post releases last year has risen to the highest level since the 2012 vintage. The 2019 vintage was rated by most of the influential critics to be excellent and a number of the investment wines have seen an impressive price performance since release.

    Bordeaux 2019 investment wines – Major Market Movers:
    2019 Wine AOC UK Release price (2020) Liv-ex Market price (2021) Growth 1 year
    Lafleur Pomerol £5,800 £12,000 106.9%
    Petrus Pomerol £20,500 £41,148 100.7%
    Figeac St Emilion £1,512 £2,500 65.3%
    Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande Pauillac £1,365 £2,140 56.8%
    Pontet-Canet Pauillac £732 £1,137 55.3%
    La Mission Haut Brion Pessac-Leognan £2,256 £3,466 53.6%
    Carruades de Lafite Pauillac £1,895 £2,600 37.1%
    Le Pin Pomerol £22,000 £30,000 36.4%
    Mouton Rothschild Pauillac £3,588 £4,711 31.3%
    Les Carmes Haut Brion Pessac Leognan £816 £1,050 28.7%
    L’Eglise-Clinet Pomerol £2,590 £3,248 25.4%

    Source: Liv-ex.com, 8th June 2021

    The Chateaux pricing strategy for the 2019s provided a great opportunity for growth and re-engaged the market in the essential spirit of en primeurs – to buy a ‘future’ at the lowest market point and enjoy the best possible position for strong returns, whilst also guaranteeing supply of highly sought-after investment wine.

    Pomerol’s Lafleur and Petrus 2019 have led the top performers over the first year of trading, both seeing over 100% rise on the UK market release price. Investors don’t have to commit five figures to see strong growth – even a ‘modest’ wine investment in Pontet-Canet 2019 en primeur under £1,000 last year delivered an impressive 55.3%.

    Trade in the second wines of the great First Growth estates has solidified over the last five to ten years. The quality is out-standing in these wines as they rub shoulders with the best in the world. Rothchild’s Carruades de Lafite has risen 37.1% on its UK release price in the last 12 months.

    St Emilion and Pessac Leognan are seen to be the most successful appellations generally for the 2020 vintage. They were blessed with optimum rainfall in a very challenging year, and the top estates of both regions are consistently achieving some of the highest critics’ scores. St Emilion’s Figeac 2019 has already seen 65% uplift in price in its first year since release. Neal Martin has scored the Figeac 2020 96 – 98 points, describing it as “a magnificent and seductive Figeac”, it will be very interesting to see its release price this vintage and one to watch.

    Pessac’s La Mission Haut Brion 2019 was rated as a potential perfect wine by Martin (98-100) last year with the expectation this could be “one of the wines of the vintage”. On one year’s price performance it certainly is with a rise of 53% at June 2021.

    The 2020 en primeurs campaign’s initial early start with Cheval Blanc out of the blocks promptly, followed by the other key St Emilion Grand Cru Classe A estates, Angelus and Pavie, has stalled slightly since late May. It would appear that the First Growths and other key estates have waited for the last of the key critics to publish scores and see what pricing strategy others are adopting in a vintage noted for its lower supply.

    The pricing strategy so far has been to see an increase on the 2019 prices. In the main the 2020s released so far have been priced between 3 – 10% up, however Chateau Pavie stands out as pricing at a similar level to the 2019 vintage. Rated by Antonio Galloni (97-99) as “one of the wines of the year” and potentially “one of the greatest wines Gerard Perse has ever made” this is a key 2020 wine for investors to consider.

    Allocations are now being released, the 2020 vintage of 2019’s top performer to date, Lafleur, is on the market and we expect the First and Second Growths and other key wines, such as Petrus and Le Pin to release imminently. For the latest information and to secure allocations contact our team on 0203 384 2262 and register your details below.

    [contact-form-7]

    The post Can the top 10 performing 2019 Bordeaux wines guide investors in 2020 en primeurs? appeared first on Vin-X.

  • Wine Book Review: Invisible Pignolo Revealed
    08 June 2021

    Ben Little, Pignolo: Cultivating the Invisible. 2021. Available exclusively from The Morning Claret Shop.

    Pignolo: Cultivating the Invisible is quite a fantastic multi-media exploration of one of Italy’s (and the world’s) nearly forgotten grape varieties. My first impression of the book was fascination — so playful, so colorful. I just had to thumb through it to discover what was on the next page. Then there was puzzlement, because I would read short passages and it wasn’t really clear what was going on.

    First fascination, then puzzlement, then — finally — enlightenment. Ok, that might be too strong, but I went back and read it from the start and it all made sense.

    First comes the history of Pignolo in the context of the history of its native region, Friuli Venezia Giulia in Italy’s upper right-hand corner. A really interesting explanation of how Pignolo, wine, and the region evolved. Then the history shifts a bit to author Ben Little’s personal experience with Pignolo, which started only a few years ago (2016) but developed quickly and soon involved many others. There is much of a technical nature to learn through Little’s first person reports.

    And then there are the lessons that Pignolo teaches us, inspirations, meditations, not sure what to call them. But by the time you get there you are ready to slow down, let the flow carry you, and absorb them, which might not have been the case at the start. Colorful graphics act as signposts along the way.

    Little’s notion that Pignolo is an invisible grape variety works. It was always there all along, you just didn’t see it. That’s how it happened for him. At first he thought that there were just a few people in Friuli growing the grapes and making wine. But once word got out that there was interest, more and more plantings and producers began to appear until there were enough to fill a room (which Little did, with a little help from Pignolo’s friends).

    Pignolo might be invisible to you, too. That’s how it was for us. Did we ever taste Pignolo during our trips to Friuli? I had to think and use the ample resources of Little’s big book. We might have tasted Pignolo when we visited the Cormons cooperative, but there were so many wines there it is hard to know. Possibly when we stayed at Il Roncal. Bastianich makes an IGT blend called Calabrone, which is includes a splash of Pignolo as a key ingredient. When we didn’t have time to taste it at the winery Wayne Young wrapped up a bottle for us to take home and I’m very glad he did. Amazing.

    We staying in one of the rooms at Borgo San Daniele and I remember distinctly the tasting where Mauro Mauri poured his Arbis Ròs Pignolo from magnum. What an amazing wine. I tried to get him to sell me some bottles, but it was all gone. Only that magnum was left. And the memory, too.

    Our final taste of Pignolo was at Paolo Rodaro and that’s when we met Ben Little. Little was nice enough to help with some difficult translations, but you could tell even then, not too long after his Pignolo journey had begun, that his focus was on the particular wine and Rodaro’s version was especially intense and interesting. There was another connection that I only learned about by reading this book — like me, Little is a recovering student of economics and can’t resist adding his insights to the blend.

    Having read Little’s book, I want to go back to Friuli and visit the small region of Rosazzo, which seems to be Pignolo’s spiritual home. Pignolo was pretty much invisible to me a few days ago, now that I see that it has been there all along, I want to ask it a few questions.

    In the meantime, I couldn’t resist trying to track down a bottle of Pignolo here in the U.S. and refresh my memory. I was able to find the 2005 La Viarte Pignolo Riserva at Kermit Lynch‘s online store. We pulled  the cork and paired the wine with Caesar salad and a prime-grade dry-aged steak — clearly this was a special meal. The wine lived up to the occasion. The first glass was a bit wild, but it settled down and developed along several axes over the next two hours. Sue said that the wine really pulled itself together when the food arrived just as it was meant to do, I think.

    Some wine experiences are delicious but not especially interesting — you know what you are getting. Others are interesting, but not necessary delicious — you are happy to stop after the first glass. The Pignolo was both, so it is easy to understand Little’s fascinating with it.

    Pignolo: Cultivating the Invisible is a highly personal memoir of and tribute to a very distinctive grape and the people who have nurtured it as it nurtured them. More than a book, it is an experience. Highly Recommended.

  • Bordeaux EP Weekly Summary - 31st May - 4th June
    07 June 2021

Wine blogs

Wine Blogs

20 June 2021

Wine Blogs Wine Blogs
  • The Hill of Corton, White Wines
    20 June 2021

     Burgundy is widely regarded as the most complex wine region in the world. However, all you have to initially understand are three principles about its structure. One, it is vineyard based (as opposed to winery based). Two, there are distinct subregions, displaying quite distinct characteristics. Three, there is a hierarchy of wines, starting from grand cru and going down. What makes it complicated for non French people is the labelling, but let us just ignore this here.

    However, within Burgundy, there is one region which is really complicated, and this is the Hill of Corton. The following map shows its terroir. As can be seen, vineyards can point in all directions other than North. There are also major differences in altitude.

             

    Corton is the largest grand cru area in Burgundy. The white wines are mostly labelled Corton-Charlemagne. I will review three of those wines here. The first is the 2010 Louis Jadot Domaine des Héritiers Corton-Charlemagne.


    Louis Jadot has a negociant business with varying quality. This wine, from a south facing owned vineyard, is excellent. It has the hallmarks of a white grand cru: good fruit weight, good length, and power. Yet it starts with a fragrant nose, but then builds on the palate via intense fruit flavours and minerality to a lasting finish.

    Score: 95/+++

    The second wine, the 2012 Henri Boillot Corton-Charlemagne, is vastly different.


    This wine is two years younger, yet the colour is more advanced and golden. Primary fruit is not the prominent feature here any more. The flavours are creamy, with nougat and hazelnut on top of wet stone minerality. This wine has a big mouthfeel (like Meursault) and good intensity.

    Score: 94/+++

    The third wine is the 2015 Buisson-Charles Corton-Charlemagne. This wine is the total opposite to the last wine. This is a delicate wine, despite hailing from a very warm vintage. The colour is quite pale.
    Pineapple and passion fruit flavours dance lightly on the palate. The wine has good drive, but is perhaps a little thin on the back palate.

    Score: 93/++

    Conclusion: We have three wines here from the same subregion, yet they are totally different: the Jadot a grand cru classic, the Henri-Boillot a big and ripe wine, and the Buisson-Charles delicate and light. 

    Let me come back to my introduction. The Burgundy principles are not that hard, but the key to understand and appreciate it, is to understand the producer. If you had tasted one of these wines, and you thought you knew what Corton tastes like, you could not have been more wrong. And this is what makes the Hill of Corton particularly difficult. The range of expressions here is probably wider than anywhere else in Burgundy.  

      



        

  • Cavallotto: from Bricco Boschis stars are born
    20 June 2021

    Toward the end of the 19th century, many of Piedmont's sprawling aristocratic estates had collapsed, their demise linked in part to falling land prices following Europe’s catastrophic phylloxera epidemic. Many of these estates belonged to Countess Juliette Colbert de Barolo who is rumoured to have made Barolo in her Turin estate long before it was sold on the open market. In Castiglione Falletto, the Countess' estate included the south-facing Monte della Guardia, tended by her vineyard manager, Giuseppe Boschis, from whom today the site takes its name. Having inherited the land, Giuseppe later sold the estate to Giacomo Cavallotto. In 1946, following the fall of fascism, Giuseppe decided to stop selling his grapes to a negociant and in 1948 registered the Cavallotto name with its own label. By 1965, the cru Bricco Boschis had been added to the label, followed in 1970 (inspired by the pioneering Renato Ratti) by the names of the vineyards core constituent parcels. In 1989, the family expanded their landholdings to include the historic Vigonolo cru, adjacent to Bricco Boschis. Together the sites form a contiguous parcel spanning a large portion of the hillside parallel to Monprivato. Today, fourth-generation winemakers Alfio and Giuseppe Cavallotto tend to the family's 25ha estate. Both enologists, the pair have further strengthened their predecessor's commitment to rigorous, pioneering and attentive farming, producing vibrant, ethereal and soulful wines. I spoke to Alfio about the estate's continued evolution and progressive approach to viticulture and winemaking.

    The post Cavallotto: from Bricco Boschis stars are born appeared first on Word on the Grapevine.

  • Lang & Reed: From Franc to Blanc
    20 June 2021

    It’s Drink Chenin Blanc Day! So pull out those bottles of beautiful Chenin Blanc and pour yourself a glass while enjoying this story about Lang & Reed in Napa. When John and Tracey Skupny started Lang & Reed twenty-five years ago, they focused on Cabernet Franc. But when their son Reed and his wife Megan fell in love with Chenin Blanc, a collaboration between father and son was born as I wrote about in the Napa Valley Register and you can read here.

    June 19 is Drink Chenin Blanc Day. At this point, what grape variety does not have its own day? But, Chenin Blanc, one of the oldest noble grape varieties, as well as one of the most versatile grapes, definitely deserves a day of honor, even if we never need an excuse to drink it.

    Chenin Blanc originated in France’s Loire Valley. An offspring of the French wine grape Savagnin, a half-sibling to the Sauvignon Blanc grape, and an aunt/uncle to the Cabernet Sauvignon grape, Chenin Blanc was once the second most widely planted white grape in Napa County.

    While Chenin Blanc has found a second home in South Africa, which has the most plantings of Chenin Blanc outside of France which is more than the rest of the world combined, excluding France. In California, Chenin Blanc has been mostly forgotten.
    Today there are fewer than 5,000 acres in California, with the majority of it growing in Fresno, Madera, San Joaquin, and Yolo counties. There are less than 30 acres planted in Mendocino and even less in Napa. In 1980, there were 2,800 acres planted in Napa and today there are only 15 acres.

    Fortunately, there are some champions of Chenin Blanc in the Napa Valley and one of those champions is Lang & Reed. It is not surprising that John and Tracey Skupny of Lang & Reed are proponents of this underappreciated white wine; after all, they built their winery on another underappreciated wine, Cabernet Franc.

    Lang & Reed, named after Tracey and John’s two sons, was born in 1996. After mostly working for Cabernet Sauvignon producers, John and Tracey wanted to explore the distinct charms of Cabernet Franc. While Cabernet Franc is an important component in Bordeaux blends, they wanted to express the range of aromatics and flavors of Cabernet Franc. They produce three different expressions of Cabernet Franc, sourced from different vineyards in Napa Valley and the North Coast.

    As much as John and Tracy love Cabernet Franc, it was their son Reed who fell in love with Chenin Blanc and convinced his father to make it. Growing up in Napa, Reed had never been interested in working in wine and was eager to leave Napa when he finished high school. While studying forensic anthropology in college, Reed took a year off and worked at Pahlmeyer in 2005, and then worked harvest in New Zealand in 2006. It was in New Zealand that Reed connected with an old girlfriend, his now-wife Megan.

    Reed returned home with one year of college left to complete and with a new interest in wine, considered changing majors. He did not make a change and graduated in 2008. But his interest in wine continued and he, along with Megan, who he was now engaged with, moved to France for seven months. Reed worked for at Domaine Bernard BAUDRY outside Chinon. Megan was not a big wine drinker at the time but a weekend trip to Vouvray changed her mind. They both fell in love with Chenin Blanc.

    John and Tracey traveled to France for Reed and Megan’s wedding and John and Reed went to Vouvray to pick up wines for the wedding. After enjoying some wines, Reed asked his father, “What happened to Chenin Blanc in Napa?”

    John responded that if they could find some, they would make it. It took three years to find fruit they wanted to use. They found a vineyard in Mendocino and purchased three tons. Making Chenin Blanc is the first wine collaboration between John and Reed and from here, Lang & Reed went from “Franc to Blanc”.

    Chenin Blanc is a neutral grape that is influenced by the climate and soil it is grown in, as well as influenced by winemaker choices. It can be made into sparkling wine, such as Cremant de Loire. It can be made as a dry white wine that can range from simple and fresh to complex with plenty of oak. Chenin Blanc can also be made as an off-dry or dessert wine. At Lang & Reed, the Chenin Blanc is made pure and simple. The grapes are picked, fermented in the barrel, with a small percentage in stainless steel, and then bottled. The singular goal is to make the purest expression of Chenin Blanc, to make wines with a sense of harmony and balance.

    Lang & Reed produces two Chenin Blancs, one from Mendocino and one from Napa.

    For the Mendocino Chenin Blanc, the fruit is sourced from the Norgard Vineyard on the Talmage bench. Planted in 1980, there are approximately 12-16 acres of Chenin Blanc. For the Mendocino Chenin Blanc, the barrels used are two-, three-, and four-year-old barrels, and half of the barrels are fermented with native yeasts. The Skupny’s first vintage from this cool region was in 2013 and tasting the Lang & Reed 2013 Chenin Blanc, it is still lively with floral and fruit notes, as well as honeycomb wax, and with soft acidity that rushes the palate. The current release is the 2019 and this wine has a very pretty nose of floral blossoms, white peach, apple peel, and pear. The acidity is bright and fresh with minerality on the finish, making this wine perfect for oysters or shellfish.

    For the Napa Chenin Blanc, the fruit is sourced from the Locey Vineyard in the Oak Knoll District. A flat vineyard with sandy soils, the .9 acres of Chenin Blanc was grafted in 2005. For the Napa Chenin Blanc, the barrels used are new and 1-year old barrels. 2014 was the first vintage from this vineyard and today the 2014 has notes of peach, apple, and honeycomb. The current vintage is the 2018 Chenin Blanc which has aromas of melon, nectarine, and citrus and a weighty acidity that sits on the tongue.

    Delicate, vibrant, and balanced, it is hard not to love Chenin Blanc, especially after enjoying the Lang & Reed Chenin Blancs. It is a versatile grape with great ageing potential and while we do not need an excuse to drink it, open a bottle on Drink Chenin Blanc Day.

    Taste the Lang & Reed wines at the Spring House, 1244 Spring St., St. Helena. To make a tasting appointment, visit www.langandreed.com/tastingsalon.

    Read the original story in the Napa Valley Register.

  • Yangarra Estate Roux Beaute Roussanne 2019
    20 June 2021

     



    Brilliance looks like this. A wonderfully layered Roussanne from Yangarra Estate.

    As with all Yangarra Estate wines, there is an incredible precision that goes into the making.

    50% is destemmed, crushed and filled to 675L ceramic eggs and fermented on skins for 96 days. The other 50% juice is pressed and fermented without skins in ceramic eggs with the final blend being 45% extended skin batch and 55% without skins.

    The wine delivers biscuity nuances, ginger, almonds, green tea and raw nuts. Licks of lemon and honeyed tones slide in later. A textural delight, it firms up in the mouth but then slowly loosens the noose. Superbly balanced, it just sings bringing all elements together in absolute harmony.

    Drink to five years+

    95/100

    Region: McLaren Vale
    RRP: $60
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

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  • Soul Growers Eden Valley Riesling 2021
    20 June 2021

     


    The first of the Barossa 2021s to arrive and all the talk of a super vintage hold true. Fresh as and screaming for sunshine and smiles, this Riesling is refreshing deluxe. Get in my belly material.

    Sourced from the Eden Valley, it is bursting with lemons and limes - come at me. A pretty perfume of bath salts and white flowers with talc-like feels through the mouth, that citrus goodness drives along with admirable persistence. Long lunch, summertime in the pool or just coz, this is a great Riesling.

    Drink now. 

    93/100

    Region: Barossa
    RRP: $28
    Source: Sample

    Winery Website

    Subscribe to Qwine here

    Follow me: Twitter and Instagram 


  • Sicilian Wine | Italy’s Best Kept Secret
    20 June 2021

    Queue the mandolins! It’s time to talk about Sicily. Sicily is world famous for its part in the classic film the Godfather. However, Sicily is much more and Sicilian wine is one of Italy’s best kept secrets.

    The Isle of Sicily is located by toe of Italy’s famous boot. Possessing a population of 5 million people, with 1.5 million Sicilian’s living in the capital of Palermo. There is no shortage of sunny beaches, stunning architecture or rich culture. Sicily even has an active volcano, Mount Etna, for good measure. Despite this, the thing that draws tourists to Italy more than all else is quality food and drink. 

    Coast of Palermo – the Sicilian capital

    The climate is exactly as expected being so far south in the Mediterranean. Dry and sunny, with temperatures of over 40 degrees in the Summer. Indeed, the climate itself helps make Sicilian wine so desirable. Dry heat, cool nights and low risk of frost in the spring lends itself to low-intervention organic wine. The virtues of organic and biodynamic wine are clear. While varied terroir means Sicilian wine offers a broad number of options.

    An ever-growing figure in the wine world, Sicilian Wine is becoming more well-respected. Let’s look further into the wines of Sicily and why they are worth their salt.

    White Wines of Sicily

    The thought of a 40 degree heat already has me reaching for something cold. In that kind of heat I am always going to reach for a glass of white wine.

    Catarratto is one of the most widely planted grapes in the whole of Italy. It is also a crucial element of Sicilian wine, present in all of the island’s provinces. The Catarratto grapes are often blended with other varieties of Sicilian wine. Faintly frosted grapes tend to possess citrus aromas and dominant lemon flavour.

    Another white grape of note is Carricante. This ancient wine is indigenous to Sicily and has been grown on the island for over a thousand years. Although, it is far less common than Catarratto. Carricante is only grown on 500 acres of awe-inspiring slopes on Mount Etna. Much like Catarratto, the Carricante is a frequent blending partner in Sicilian white wines. Carricante has a vast range of citrus aromas attributed to it. You can expect lime, lemon, orange or grapefruit notes.

    Sicilian Grillo
    Grillo Grapes – one of the highlights of Sicilian wine

    There are a number of options for white wine in Sicily. However, Grillo could be the fastest growing and most exciting. Although lower yields have caused it to fall out of favour. Grillo has broken from its roots as a means to produce the fortified Marsala wine, into a Sicilian still wine in its own right. 

    The man behind the revival of Grillo is producer Marco de Bartoli, who originally was known as a legendary Marsala producer. Indeed, he is still producing great Marsala. However, he also was key in bringing Grillo to the forefront of Sicilian Wine.

    Like much Sicilian wine, the climate can be attributed to Grillo’s success. Renato de Bartoli, (Marco’s son), notes how Grillo is perfect for the Marsala region. It “thrives in the heat”. We can see how Sicilian wine seems made for the climate it is in. No extra support is needed for these vines to grow into something spectacular.

    Grillo varies in terms of taste. This variety stems from the winemaking processes involved. More modern approaches of limiting air exposure and selected strains of yeast, result in a dry style wine which has high levels of acidity and strong lemon flavours and aromas . This is somewhere akin to the Catarratto grape, a parent to the Grillo.

    The traditional approaches found in the likes of De Bartoli however, produce a more nuanced and refined product. These traditionally make Grillo possess strong citrus notes. Below these notes is an undercurrent of minerality, as the grapes are allowed greater time to soak up the Terre Siciliane. 

    For a great example of Grillo and Sicilian wine in general – look no further than right here.

    Di Giovanna – Grillo 19′Red Wines of Sicily

    If you’re more partial to red than white, then no need to worry. Sicilian wine also has a number of great offerings of red wine. Let’s review some now.

    Frappato is one of Sicily’s oldest wines. With 85% of Frappato vines being found on Sicily. Mostly used in blends, Frappato is comparable to Beaujolais or Pinot Noir. Lightly coloured and delicious when chilled. This makes it an excellent red wine for the Sicilian heat.

    For something medium-bodied, Nerello Mascalese is the one to try. Another grape found on the volcanic soil of Mount Etna, 1000 meters above sea level. High altitudes and volcanic soil both adding to the overall flavour. These factors help make Nerello Mascalese a rich and complex wine, which is lighter than other Sicilian reds.

    Nero d’Avola

    Nero d’Avola is the most well-known Sicilian red. It translates to ‘Black of Avola’. This is due to the darkness of the grapes and the Sicilian town of Avola. Although there is debate as to the grapes exact origins. Much like the Grillo, Nero d’Avola has had a recent revival. Previously, it was used to add colour and body to lighter Italian wines. However, it is now a red Sicilian wine that can be enjoyed on its own.

    If like Leonard Cohen, ‘You Want It Darker’, then Nero d’Avola is going to be the Sicilian wine for you. Frappato and Nerello Mascalese red wines are light and medium bodied options. By comparison, Nero d’Avola is much darker and denser. Something in between would be a Barolo which is a medium bodied premium red wine from the Piedmont region in northern Italy.

    Nero d’Avola – the most prominent red Sicilian wine

    The best thing about Nero d’Avola is that you can expect great variety between the different Sicilian wine regions. The dark, dense grape variety is often stored in oak barrels. Nero d’Avola possess rich flavours of black fruit and chocolate, with subtle spicy notes. Nero d’Avola is also suitable for ageing. The younger wines are still dark, comparative to other Sicilian wines, but have a different flavour profile. Young Nero d’Avola tends to give off red-currant fruit flavours.

    For a great example of Nero d’Avola and Sicilian wine in general – look no further than right here.

    Di Giovanna – Vurria Nero d’Avola 19′Top Vineyards in Sicily

    All this talk of Sicilian wine may already be enough for you to pick Sicily as your next holiday destination. So, let’s consider some of the best vineyards in Sicily to visit, whilst you are there.

    For a taste of the history of Sicilian wine, then Cantine Settesoli should be on your list. Settesoli began producing wine in 1958. However, under the leadership of the late Diego Planeta, it found international fame. Planeta worked with respected oenologists. He combined classic indigenous Sicilian grapes, with international varieties. Still, this award-winning vineyard continues to be a symbol of Sicilian wine.

    Another great option is a small family run vineyard called Cantina Horus. Located on the South-West coast, just outside the town of Vittoria. Cantina Horus produces fantastic organic Sicilian wines. Grillo, Frappato and Nero d’Avola to name a few. The Sicilian climate contributes to Cantina Horus’ great Sicilian wine. High-altitude vineyards, soaked in the Mediterranean sun with beautiful sea breezes. Cantina Horus promotes practices that are eco-friendly, through traditional farming methods.

    Then, there is Di Giovanna. They are an example of a vinter who typify everything great about Sicilian wine. Managed by 5th generation winemakers, with a focus on organically cultivated vineyards. Di Giovanna is situated on a protected nature reserve, allowing for stunning views while you enjoy some award-winning Sicilian wine. Across there 5 vineyards you can expect to find a richly diverse terroir, leading to a wide range of excellent wines to sample.

    Di Giovanna – one of the best producers of Sicilian wine
    Pairing Food with Sicilian Wine

    No trip to Italy is complete without delicious food. As such, let’s discuss the best food to pair with great Sicilian wine.

    We can begin with Grillo. Grillo is light, with citrus-driven flavours, nutty aromas and great minerality. This means a few Sicilian dishes would be excellent pairings. ‘Pasta con macco di fave’ is a prime example. This pasta dish, made with ricotta and beans, would compliment a cold Grillo perfectly. However, if you want something to nibble on instead, then some sheep’s or goats milk cheese would be perfect. A nutty pecorino or the Sicilian Canestrato. Canestrato is a hard cheese made through combining sheep and goat’s milk. Either would be an ideal pairing for Grillo.

    Canestrato – perfect with a glass of Grillo!

    Now for pairing the Nero d’Avola with some traditional Italian dishes. Rich red meat is the best option. For this reason, ‘Bistecca alla Siciliana‘ is the way to go. This is steak in a rich tomato sauce, (similar to ‘Steak Pizzaiola’). Simply made but decadent. If you don’t want the full meal, then Italy and Sicily both have an endless variety of cured meats. These are ideal to snack on with your next Nero d’Avola. Soppressata or Capocollo are two fine examples.

    ‘Bistecca alla Siciliana’ – a dish made for Nero d’Avola

    After writing all this I’m now ready to go back to Sicily. With return flights available from under £200 per person, (London to Sicily), why not? As I have said, Sicilian wine alone is a reason to jump on a plane. However, there is much more to Sicily than wine. Enjoy Sicilian wine, alongside some delicious food and a rich cultural experience. All set in the stunning scenery of the island.

    If you enjoyed reading this article then sign up to our mailing list below. We are constantly seeking out new producers, products and educating people about different wine regions and grape varieties.

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    The post Sicilian Wine | Italy’s Best Kept Secret appeared first on Savage Vines.

  • Gratitude Red by JAK’s 2019 and Banger Sausage Pairing
    19 June 2021

    Gratitude Red by JAK’s 2019 wine label

    More gratitude to hand out today to all the winemakers around the world. You make wines so that we can enjoy them with friends and family. With COVID restrictions lifting we can now do this safely in person. I have a bottle of Gratitude Red 2019 by JAK’s, made by Okanagan Crush Pad, from a blend of Merlot and lesser Cabernet Franc sourced from Summerland and Osoyoos.

    In case you were admiring the label, it is drawn by West Coast illustrator Alex Maertz.

    $1 from each bottle sold of this limited release Gratitude wine is being donated to the BC Hospitality Foundation in June 2021. The British Columbia Hospitality Foundation is a charity that raises funds to support those in the hospitality industry facing financial crises due to health conditions. The BCHF helps them when all other options have been exhausted. In an earlier post, I tried their Gratitude Chardonnay and Rosé. There is a wine that should suit everyone. Let me tell you about the Gratitude Red.

    My Wine Tasting Notes Gratitude Red by JAK’s 2019

    Appearance: Uniformly translucent, 50%, from the rim to core, garnet in colour.
    Nose: A medium-plus intensity nose with fresh aromas showing red berries, sour red cherries and a touch of sweet spices. With decanting the aromas were more raspberries, brambleberries, sweet spices, and a touch of oak.  Less sour red cherries.
    Palate: Slightly off-dry, angular, with higher acidity leading to a lighter mouthfeel. Medium-plus bright flavours of juicy red fruits, tart red cherries and plums, raspberries, and a touch of floral. Tannins are not noticeable until the end. The wine was drier and more astringent with decanting.  More tart red fruits, oak and a touch of capsicum.
    Finish: A medium-plus length finishing with lingering sweet and tart red fruits, mouthwatering acidity, a touch of pepperiness and oak, and light tannins.

    With the acidity and bright red fruits, I recommend chilling the wine for 30 minutes in your fridge.  This wine would not taste as nice too warm.

    Gratitude Red by JAK’s 2019 and grilled banger sausages pairing

    Rating:   No need to decant.  A fun refreshing red wine to enjoy as soon as you open it.  Be sure to chill it in the fridge for 30 minutes for best enjoyment.  Bright red berry fruit and red cherries on the nose and palate.  High toned flavours. Acid driven.  Tannins not noticeable until the finish. Lingering red fruits, tartness and a touch of pepperiness on the finish.

    Grilled Banger Sausage Pairing

    My grilled banger sausage pairing with this wine was very good.  The sausage had some fat, but not too fatty, and the acidity in this wine minimized the fat.  The pepperiness in the wine came out a bit and the red fruit flavours complemented the savoury flavour of the sausage.

    Where Can I Buy This Wine?
    Gratitude wines are available at all JAK’s locations and online.
    Thank you to JAK’s for providing me with this wine to review.

    The post Gratitude Red by JAK’s 2019 and Banger Sausage Pairing appeared first on MyWinePal.

  • Baja wine: 2018 Valle Girl Vino Delicate Cherry La Traviesa rosé
    19 June 2021
    2018 Valle Girl Vino Delicate Cherry La Traviesa rosé Valle de Guadalupe,Baja California Norte,Mexico 12.5% alcohol Empty bottle weight: 17.9 ounces / 508 grams Cork closure  Low sulfites, gluten-free, non-GMO,...
  • Shaken, Stirred or Served Neat – It’s Time for a Cocktail!
    19 June 2021

    Although we love wine, sometimes a cocktail craves our attention. In fact, I’m hearing a few cocktails beckoning me right now, so let’s start the party! What better way to make the weekend more special than with a luscious cocktail in the glass? As luck would have it, I received (as samples) four spirits that can be shaken, stirred, served neat or poured over ice to make the most memorable of James-Bond-approved cocktails. Let’s go!

    Once you taste Ron Abuelo Centuria Rum, Reserva de la Familia ($140) you’ll know why this is a collector’s item. The Centuria was made to celebrate family and to shine a light on the 100th anniversary (in 2011) of Varela Hermano, producer of Ron Abuelo, the oldest operating family distillery in Panama. Each year, a few bottles are released so that collectors and spirits lovers are able to have access to the family’s private reserves. This particular rum is crafted from a blend of rums aged for 12-42 years in Jack Daniels whiskey barrels using a solera system.

    Balanced, smooth as satin and and oozing the elegance I anticipated, notes of sweet spice and vanilla were exceptional. I give the Ron Abuelo extra points for making this selection Kosher Certified, too. Take your choice: drink neat or over ice.

    Graham’s 20 Year Tawny Port ($65) is from the Symington Family Estates, fifth generation Port producers located in Porto, Portugal. Dark tawny in the glass, I explored elements of nuts, honey, raisins, figs and lush fruit on the nose and palate. Tawny Port as an ingredient in a cocktail? Of course!

    Mix up a Four Poster Red created by Simon Difford in 2018 at the Cabinet Room in London. Sweet vermouth, Campari, Chamberyzette and Tawny Port combine to make a cherry red aperitivo, similar to a Negroni. Stir ingredients together and strain over ice in a glass, then garnish with a maraschino cherry. If you decide to serve the Four Poster Red shaken, be sure to have a white head that covers the drink’s surface and sip before the head fades. Click here for the recipe.

    Cockburn’s “Porto Branco” Fine White ($14.50) is part of the Symington Family Estates portfolio. Scotsman Robert Cockburn founded the port house in 1815 and in 2010, it celebrated its 195th anniversary by joining Symington. This wine reminded me of my first trip to Portugal where I learned to love white port before each dinner. It’s a blend of young wines cultivated in high altitude vineyards and was aged in stainless steel for up to 18 months to preserve its fresh qualities. Beautifully gold in the glass, I discovered characteristics of flowers, almonds and herbs.

    The port reminded me of my first trip to Portugal where I learned to love a refreshing White Port & Tonic cocktail each evening before dinner Fill a tall glass with ice and add 50ml of Cockburn’s Porto Branco. Pour the tonic water over, squeeze in a wedge of lime and add a mint leaf for garnish. You may or may not want to stir. Fabulous!

    Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin (50ml/$2.99| 750ml/$36.99) is one of those spirits that will give pause (in a very good way). In a small western Irish town, in a shed at the edge of a lake, the laboratory of PJ Rigny can be found. By all accounts, he’s “pushing the boundaries” of hand made spirits and slowly distills gin with premium oriental botanicals and gunpowder tea. The tea is a green tea that’s been slowly dried, after which the leaves are carefully rolled into shiny pellets. Powerful, fresh and vibrant, I found lush fruit and spice notes with each sip.

    Trust me, the Gunpowder of Middle Earth Cocktail should be on the weekend menu, too. With the Drumshanbo Gunpowder Irish Gin, fresh kiwi, lemon juice and simple syrup, the cocktail is easy to mix. Combine all ingredients in a shaker, muddle to create the flavor, add ice then shake. Double strain into a coupe glass and add a slice of kiwi as garnish. Click here for the recipe.

    Enjoy the weekend!

    Cheers! ~ Cindy

    For more Grape Experiences and a free infographic “4 Keys to a Stellar Wine Pick” click here. 

    The post Shaken, Stirred or Served Neat – It’s Time for a Cocktail! appeared first on Grape Experiences.

  • Hello Summer Wine Sampler
    19 June 2021

    Here’s a fun new Costco wine find that I’ve heard about from multiple readers who have already found it and enjoyed it – the “Hello Summer” mixed wine multi pack that contains 12 375ml bottles from around the world.

    Sound kind of familiar?  If you were a fan of the Costco Wine Advent Calendars we wrote about last winter, then this concept might be familiar, and it’s produced by the same people. 

    Gotta love the fun styling too, and once we tasted a few of the bottles it was clear that these are definitely hand picked wines to be enjoyed during the warmer months.  We’ll run through our tasting of a few bottles below.

    Each box contains five whites, four reds and three rosé wines. The wines come from Portugal, Spain, Italy and France and include some interesting varietals you don’t come across every day; such as Macabeo or Aragonez and Castelao from Portugal, all of which we tasted and enjoyed.

    So to that extent the box is a great way not only to quench your thirst but also expand your wine horizons.  Finding and tasting new varietals from new regions is one of my favorite parts of the lifelong wine journey.

    Costco’s price is $49.99 which equates to around $4 per each half bottle.  Not bad at all.

    While we found the wines to be interesting and a nice assortment, the size of the bottles also offers a ton of convenience.  We noted this with the Advent Calendars, how sometimes you just want to share a glass of white while cooking, or a glass of rosé on a whim.  Here’s an easy way to do it without opening a whole bottle.

    Plus they fit great in coolers where the longer necks on regular sized wine bottles can protrude. So I think you get a lot here for only $50.

    As we like to do with these box sets, we pulled four random bottles to sample, resulting in two reds, a white and a rosé.  We are just sharing some notes to give you an idea of our impressions. 

    The overall takeaway is that these wines clearly hit the mark for “summer wines.”  They were light, crisp and refreshing, even the reds that in their youth were inviting in the Atlanta heat. So let’s get into the box.

    2020 Ceu do Norte Rosé

    This is a rosé from Portugal consisting of the unique varietals we mentioned above: 80% Aragonez, 20% Castelao.  The wine is pale copper in the glass with light red berry fruit; nice strawberry and cherry flavor; light and super crisp. Alc. 11.5%.  This one is summer in a bottle.

    2020 El Campeon Macabeo

    Macabeo is a tasty varietal you don’t see enough of. Often times you can find it from Rioja at the big box wine shops.  This one is medium straw in color, with a floral nose, a little stone fruit; peach, nectarine and green apple flavors.  Again, super crisp and light.  11% alc.  A fun summer sipper.

    2020 Crush Red Blend Portugal

    This Portuguese red blend is pale ruby in the glass with a spicy, earthy nose; nice aromatics; mostly dark fruit, some spicy black cherry and some pepper into the finish.  A good little wine; 13% alc.

    2020 Birds on a Wire Sangiovese

    Here’s an Italian Sangiovese that’s pale purple on the pour; super dry throughout, medium body with red fruit.  This wine is young and juicy, and would make a great pizza or BBQ bottle.  12.5% alc.

    Since it’s the middle of June it’s almost the perfect time to pick one of these up to cool you off this summer.  We’re looking forward to trying the rest of the bottles.  Our first impression is that the box is a great assortment, some interesting picks and a nice mix of varietals.  And the price is right at around $4/bottle.

    Enjoy, and if you have any favorites from the box, please share in the comments below.

    CostcoWine item number: 1426807

    This wine was received as a sample for the purpose of writing this review. All reviews are written at the discretion of the individual reviewer. Opinions of the reviewer do not necessarily reflect those of CostcoWineBlog.com as a whole, and reviewers are not paid for their reviews by wineries or their affiliated distributors. We at CostcoWineBlog.com believe that wine preferences and opinions are often subjective and highly individualistic. Our scores are based on our individual perception of a wine and how well it reflects the area in which the grapes are grown, the expression of the grapes, and also the quality of the finished product. We remind readers that we are 100% independent of Costco Wholesale Corporation, and are simply of a group of Costco wine fans looking to try new wines and share our favorites with this community.

    The post Hello Summer Wine Sampler appeared first on CostcoWineBlog.com.

Wine Podcasts

Wine Podcasts

20 June 2021

Wine Podcasts Wine Podcasts
  • Can’ t discuss wine in the mail without speaking with Paul Mabray
    19 June 2021

    Paul Mabray is considered one of the most knowledgeable consultants on the business of wine. Having worked for wine.com WineDirect.com and others.

    We could have spoken for hours. Have a listen.

  • Ep125: Drinking Like a Michigander
    19 June 2021

    As it turns out, the Mitten State has more to offer than lakes, apples, and college football – Michigan is also home to several gorgeous wineries!! This episode we recount Sarah’s recent trip to Michigan Wine Country, which was a surprising first for this Michigander. Listen in to learn about the abundance of fruit – for vino and otherwise – that make up Michigan’s coastline, and even more importantly, how does the wine taste??!! Find out with us as we sip on a Gewurztraminer from Old Mission Peninsula, MI (who knew?!)

    Listen on Apple PodcastsGooglePlay, Stitcher, iHeartRadio and other podcast-listening platforms.

  • English Wine Week with Julia Trustram-Eve of Wine GB
    18 June 2021
    Chris talks to Julia Trustram-Eve of Wine GB to find out what is going on during English Wine Week from 19-27 June 2021
  • The Wine Makers – Drive Wines
    18 June 2021

    How nice was it for the whole team to gather outback of the Sixteen600 Tasting House for a chat with John Musto and Tom Young from Drive Wines.  These guys make some really nice wines and we actually got to taste some of their original garage-made that aren’t for sale.  But don’t worry as they have plenty of great wines on their list and these are Micro-production, single-vineyard wines too.  This is another great Sonoma area success story that started out in an old race car garage that ended up well.  A beautiful day in Sonoma and an awesome show.  Enjoy [EP195]

    www.drivewines.com

    Email -> john@  tom@  drivewines.com

    Twitter, Instagram, Facebook -> @drivewines

    The post The Wine Makers – Drive Wines appeared first on Radio Misfits.

  • June 17 2021 - Guest: Ramon Escobar of Chufly Imports
    18 June 2021
    Tonight, we welcome Ramon Escobar, founder of Chufly Imports. Hosted by Ron since 2009.  Wine maker, cellar master, vineyardist and tasting expert, Ron, makes wine less confusing and more fun.  Learn something new each week during the show.  We are always looking for guests to talk about their winery, vineyard, wine-related product, enology, horticulture and more.  Visit our website for details on how to "be a guest". We are not taking calls any more during the LIVE show, however, join us in chat on our Facebook page, YouTube or our BlogTalkRadio page
  • Ep. 593 Marchese Carlo Guerrieri Gonzaga Pt. 5 | #everybodyneedsabitofscienza
    18 June 2021
    Ep. 593 Marchese Carlo Guerrieri Gonzaga Pt. 5 on #everybodyneedsabitofscienza Hello again folks! So we have finally reached the end of our little journey at Tenuta San Leonardo - Tune in to this 5th and final installment of our extra-special episodes dedicated to Scienza and the Marchese. Scienza fans can get a sneak peek into his life growing up as he talks to one of his oldest buddies! The Marchese and Scienza sit down and remember some of their heroic work, going to France and planting vines... Find out more about Tenuta San Leonardo by visiting them at: https://www.sanleonardo.it/en Until next time, CIN CIN! (How do you say cin cin in your language?) Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/
  • Orsi Family Vineyards with Teri Rolleri
    17 June 2021

    Wine Road Podcast Episode 128

    Orsi Family Vineyards with Terri Rolleri, Chief Executive Hospitalian

    Searching for Italy? You can find it along the Wine Road at Orsi Family Vineyards in Healdsburg—one of our newest Wine Road members. Terri Rolleri tells us all about the rare and unusual Italian varietals you’ll find at the tasting room and how to live a bit of la dolce vita right here in Sonoma County.

    Wine of the Day: Oris Family Vineyards 2016 Schioppettino

    Item of the Day: Breakfast Wine coffee mug

    Book of the Day: The New Wines of Mount Etna by Benjamin North Spencer

    SHOW NOTES

    0:53- Orsi Family VIneyards just opened in May.

    2:20 Wine of the Day 2016 Schioppettino form Orsi Family. One of the many Italian varietals planted on the home ranch. Spicy and bright--full of rotundone!

    6:23 Biancolella D’Ischia one of the featured white wines from the island of Ischia where the paternal grandmother of the Orsi family was born.

    8:00 The philosophy of the tasting room is we want you to feel as if you are coming to our home. Wines featured with appropriate foods to accompany each flavor profile.

    10:15 Orsi Food program will include pizza from on site pizza oven.

    11:21 Opera at Orsi will be coming soon as part of the music program.

    12:22 The Orsi “backyard” has lawn seating and table seating and bocce courts forthcoming as well. Located just two minutes form the downtown square in Healdsburg. Walk-ins welcome in addition to appointments by reservation.

    16:06 Beth’s Breakfast Wine mug!

    16:15 Label features the home ranch with 13 little cypress tress symbolizing Bernie’s 13 grandchildren. Tagline -- Italian Roots in Sonoma County Soil.

    17:25 Book of the Day – The New Wines of Mount Etna

    18:44 Shout out to the mushroom management style –google it! ;-)

    20:20 Orsi Family have been growers for over 30 years.

    21:21 Visit Orsi for some Italian varietals you won’t find anywhere else.

    22:22 California is now open but wineries still doing reservations only so be sure to check the Wine Road website for the current details before you visit.

    Links

    Orsi Family Vineyards -- https://orsifamilyvineyards.com/

    The New Wines of Mount Etna

    Wine Road https://www.wineroad.com

    Sonoma County Winegrowers -- https://sonomawinegrape.org/

    Wine Road Podcast Instagram -- @wineroadpodcast

    Credits:The Wine Road podcast is mixed and mastered at Threshold Studios Sebastopol, CA.

    http://thresholdstudios.info/

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