No events
June 2021
M T W T F S S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30

Blog Calendar - Theatre

« June 2021 »
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30        

Theatre blogs

Theatre Blogs

17 June 2021

Theatre Blogs Theatre Blogs
  • Review: Gilbert & Sullivan’s Improbable New Musical … & Helen (Brighton Fringe)
    17 June 2021

    In Coily Dart”s latest production, which again presents the work of Gilbert & Sullivan “with a twist”, the impact of Helen Carte is explored as she sorts out copyright issues, brings the house company together, pushes forward the creation of the Savoy Theatre and hotel, and acts as the peacemaker between WS Gilbert (‘Willie’) and...

    The post Review: Gilbert & Sullivan’s Improbable New Musical … & Helen (Brighton Fringe) appeared first on LouReviews.

  • Humane (Online review)
    17 June 2021
    A reminder of the potential power of focused communal action
  • Playlist: ET radio show 16 June 2021
    17 June 2021
    Interview with Aaron-Lee Eyles on ‘I Didnt Want This, I Just Wanted You’

    You can also find a written interview with Aaron here

    Shows, Venues & Theatre Companies mentioned Music Playlist
    • Beastie Boys – Sabotage
    • Audioweb – Bankrobber
    • Big Audio Dynamite – Can’t Wait/ Live
    • Finding Rhythms – Change – available via the charity’s bandcamp page here
    • Peter Doherty & The Puta Madres – Paradise Is Under Your Nose
    • Unkle feat Damon Gough – Nursery Rhyme Breather
    • Frank Turner – Don’t Worry
    • Goat Girl – P.T.S.Tea
    • Bombay Bicycle Club – Carry Me
    • My Life Story – World Citizen
    • Busdriver – Unemployed Black Astronaut
    • The Streets feat. Idles – None Of Us Are Getting Out Of This Alive
    • Young Fathers – Nest
    • Sage Francis – Lie Detector Test
    • Dan Le Sac Vs Scroobius Pip – Beat That My Heart Skipped
    • The White Stripes – Feel in Love With A Girl
    • Metermaids – Advice I Know You Won’t Follow – check out the video here
    • Imogen Stirling – White
    • Kae Tempest – Tunnel Vision
    • The Beloved – Hello
    • The National – Nobody Else Will Be There

    The post Playlist: ET radio show 16 June 2021 appeared first on Everything Theatre.

  • Review: Between the Cracks (Jermyn Street Theatre, online)
    17 June 2021

    The tiny off-West End theatre on Jermyn Street has opened with a flourish with its Footprints Festival, which runs throughout June and July. In the Showcases strand, Between the Cracks presents three plays by the theatre’s creative associate artists and guests. Actor-writer performance is always fascinating to watch, and this trio of plays both complement...

    The post Review: Between the Cracks (Jermyn Street Theatre, online) appeared first on LouReviews.

  • A Note from Declan, 17 June
    17 June 2021

    Dear Grif-friend,

    We’re heading into the depths of winter, but the theatre scene in Sydney is well and truly defrosting from the snap-freeze of 2020. I’ve seen some extraordinary work on stages large and small over the last few weeks… Yellow Face at KXT, Seven Methods of Killing Kylie Jenner from Green Door/Darlinghurst Theatre Company, the Angela Goh’s mind-bending (and time-bending) Blue Sky Mythic at the Opera House… 

    Last week I also made a quick trip to Canberra to see Milk at The Street Theatre, written by playwright, Palawa man, and 2020 Griffin Award winner Dylan Van Den BergMilk won the NSW Premier’s Literary Award for Drama—despite being Dylan’s first play (!). And within moments of the show beginning, you could see why, with its extraordinary lyrical prose and visceral storytelling. Dylan is one of our 2021 Griffin Studio artists, and I suspect you’ll be seeing his work on the SBW Stables stage sometime very soon… 

    If you somehow missed us howling about it all over social media, a pretty huge thing happened this last week—with the announcement of Griffin joining the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework

    If you’re not fluent in the language of arts bureaucracy, it can be a little hard to understand what this means, but it’s really huge.  

    To explain:  

    Every four years, Griffin used to have to re-apply for our government funding from scratch. This meant writing monster grant applications that explained what we do, why we do it, and laid out all our plans for the next four years. Putting these together took weeks, sometimes months of work—all while we were still trying to rehearse and put on shows. And if our application wasn’t successful, and our funding got cut or reduced, we were pretty much screwed (see: our funding cuts in 2015).   

    But now that we’re part of the Framework, our funding is secure for 8 years at a time—the same as the other, bigger theatre companies, like Sydney Theatre Company, Belvoir, etc. Which now means we’ve got a lot more security to dream further ahead. Excitingly, we also received an upshot to our funding, which puts us back to pre-2015 levels. 

    Like I said: really huge. 

    Buuuuuut, if you think that means we won’t be asking for your help come End of Financial Year… I have bad news for you, my friend! We’re more secure in our monies now, but unfortunately, government $$$ doesn’t cover some of the most important things we need to do…  Like commissioning playwrights to write plays, and holding workshops to make sure they’re ready to go on stage. We are still totally reliant on you for that! So if you can, please donate this year—it’ll help us support artists after a really rough 2020. 

    All this incredible stuff has been happening in the Griffin office, but there’s been exciting things brewing up in our rehearsal rooms as well over the last few weeks. 

    Last Monday, our next Main Season show, Wherever She Wanders kicked off rehearsals. I got to see the first read and let me tell you, it was pure fire: the formidable Emily Havea and Fiona Press going head-to-head in a collision of two different eras of feminism. It’s a privilege that Griffin gets to premiere this work from the masterful pen of Kendall Feaver (The Almighty Sometimes) under Tessa Leong’s direction. Tickets are already flying out the door, so get in early on this one

    Meanwhile, another master work of feminist playwriting is finding its feet again: Suzie Miller’s multi-award-winning Prima Facie is gearing up for its Special Return Season at the Seymour Centre, ahead of a tour to Queensland Theatre and Geelong Arts Centre. It’s been a true joy to welcome Lee Lewis and Sheridan Harbridge back into the Griffin fold, and we’re beside ourselves with excitement to see this work ride again.

    That’s all! I’ve got to run… My partner Troy has FINALLY been able to move to Sydney from Melbourne, after a year and a half of living apart. We’re spending a lot of our time house-hunting—trying to find an apartment in Sydney that’s at least 2km away from a hot-yoga studio or a vegan fromagerie (we don’t need that kind of negative energy in our lives, thank you). Wish us luck.  

    Much love,
    Declan xx 

     

    The post A Note from Declan, 17 June appeared first on Griffin Theatre Company.

  • Livestreaming a Convesation: #DeafWoke with Dorothea Tolliver
    16 June 2021
    By . Antoine Hunter presents #DeafWoke with Dorothea Tolliver livestreaming on the global, commons-based, peer produced HowlRound TV network at howlround.tv on Thursday 25 June at 4 p.m.
  • Livestreaming a Conversation: NO SUMMARY: The SWANA Queer Imagination
    16 June 2021
    By . Golden Thread Productions presents NO SUMMARY: The SWANA Queer Imagination livestreaming on the global, commons-based, peer produced HowlRound TV network at howlround.tv on Friday 25 June 2021 at 1
  • It’s Only A Play review. Terrence McNally’s bitchy semi-updated Broadway backstage comedy
    16 June 2021

    This George Street Playhouse production of Terrence McNally’s 35-year-old bitchy, witty backstage comedy about the opening night party of a Broadway flop comes almost seven years after its star-studded debut on Broadway itself. In my review of the production back then, I wrote that the first half hour was the funniest I’d seen all season, and that the second act was among the dullest.

    This hasn’t changed. But much else has. Ben Brantley is no longer the Times theater critic. Terrence McNally is no longer alive. Also: There’s no Broadway.

    It thus seems a strange time for a production of “It’s Only A Play,” which was filmed onstage at the New Brunswick Performing Arts Center and will be streamed online through July 4th.  That it’s a digital presentation just amps up the incongruity, especially when a character in the play marvels about the beauty of live theater:  “The thing about theatre is this: it’s actually happening at the very moment it is,” she says on stage in the recording.

    McNally, who died last year at the age of 81, wrote 36 plays, the books for 10 musicals, and the librettos for four operas, and I think I would have preferred to see just about any one of them revived over “It’s Only a Play.”

    My guess is that director Kevin Cahoon et al intended this revival to be both a loving exercise in nostalgia and a hopeful preview of Broadway’s return. (That surely explains the sappy rendition of “There’s No Business Like Show Business” at the beginning and end of the video.)  Clearly, I don’t see it the same way. Still, to my surprise, I found at least two ways that their production felt an improvement over the 2014 Broadway version.

    “It’s Only A Play” takes place in the townhouse of the producer of “The Golden Egg” on the night of its Broadway opening – in the first act, the characters wait for the reviews; in the second act, they react to them.  On Broadway, six of the seven characters were portrayed by celebrated performers.  In the George Street production, there is really only one famous name – Julie Halston —  and she’s fabulous as Virginia Noyes, a washed-up, coked-up Hollywood movie star who took the part in the play to revive her career, and feels guilty that her ankle bracelet went off during her performance. The rest of the cast are lesser-known, hard-working  actors.  Zach Shaffer, who’s had a respectable career including on Broadway but is not as well-known as Nathan Lane, now portrays James Wicker, the playwright’s best friend who gave up Broadway to star in a TV series. Similarly, Christine Toy Johnson takes on the role that Megan Mullally had on Broadway of the producer Julia Budder, and Andy Grotelueschen, Tony nominee for his role as Santino Fontana’s put-upon roommate in Tootsie, is the playwright Peter Austin, which Matthew Broderick played on Broadway. The casting — combined with a top ticket price of $33, not $172 — makes the show feel less chummy and insider. And this in turn somehow makes more palatable the pot-shots the play takes at generic theater people (the titled bad-boy British director; the untalented, corrupt, envious critic;  the naïve, filthy rich female producer) if not the mean-spirited insults towards such named celebrities as Faye Dunaway, Rita Moreno, and Tommy Tune.

    On Broadway seven years ago, the creative team tried to update “It’s Only a Play” from the original 1985 Off-Broadway script, adding references to selfies, sexting and chat rooms, and replacing no longer familiar celebrity names in its shtick of constant name-dropping (“Al Pacino! Can you believe it?” Gus, the star-struck newcomer, exclaims on the phone to his mentor. “This place is crawling with famous people. Donald Trump looked right at me and asked me for a glass of Dom Perignon. I told him I was taking coats. My first night in New York and I’m High-Fiving Denzel Washington. I’m pretty sure I saw Rosie O’Donnell talking to the Pope “) 

    From an anthropological point of view, if nothing else, it’s interesting to see what the new production itself chooses to update, and what it leaves as anachronism.

    Gus (portrayed by Doug Harris) still gushes over everybody in that opening monologue, except Donald Trump. Instead of carrying in Shia LaBeouf’s coat, he brings in the coats of the entire cast of “Hamilton.” The playwright Peter Austin (Grotelueschen) still calls Ben Brantley a “pretentious, diva-worshipping, British-ass-kissing twat.” Instead of complaining that he couldn’t see the stage because “they put me behind Mayor de Blasio” (a reference to the New York City mayor’s height), Ira Drew, the loathsome critic (Triney Sandoval) complains about Chris Christie (a reference to the former governor of New Jersey’s girth.) Frank, the bad-boy British director (Greg Cuellar) no longer says “I won’t work with animals, children or Frank Langella.” Langella has been replaced by F. Murray Abraham – which seems bizarre (Langella is still a familiar name) unless you know that F. Murray Abraham portrayed the critic in the Broadway production of “It’s Only a Play.” A new inside joke!

    It’s Only A Play
    George Street Playhouse
    Through July 4
    Running time: two hours
    $33
    Written by Terrence McNally
    Directed by Kevin Cahoon
    Cast: Greg Cuellar as Sir Frank Finger, Andy Grotelueschen as playwright Peter Austin, Julie Halston as leading lady Virginia Noyes, Doug Harris as star-struck neophyte Gus P. Head, Christine Toy Johnson as naive rich producer Julia Budder, Triney Sandoval as corrupt critic Ira Drew, Zach Shaffer as leading man James Wicker

  • Lone Flyer/Eng-er-land (Online review)
    16 June 2021
    Footprints Festival at Jermyn Street celebrates female empowerment
  • Theatre for Two, Stanley Arts
    16 June 2021

    by Laura Kressly

    In the middle of a dark room, I am ushered into what looks like a largish, stand-alone cupboard. With a spotlight above a single chair facing a perspex sheet covered with a window blind, there is an immediate sense of the audience becoming the performer. Given that the four mini-plays making up this event are semi-improvised character pieces relying on audience interaction, this feeling is apt. As much the playlets are highly theatrical and often disarming, they are also intimate and conversational. In a time where many of us are learning how to just be in the same space as another person, unmediated by a computer screen, Theatre for Two is comforting and familiar as well as challenging what has become normal disconnect from people and the world we live in.

    Two actors each perform two of the shows. Mary Malone is up first in Macadie Amoroso’s Reptile as someone taking it day-by-day after a break-up. Or rather, taking it glass of wine by glass of wine. Feeling lonely and detatched from the world, she looks for meaning and connection from whoever and whatever she finds in the safety of her bedroom. She’s also fighting the urge to call her ex, but girl, we know that never ends well. There’s a clever reveal that firmly assigns an identity to the audience rather than leaving questions unanswered about who she’s talking to. Though often left out of solo performances, explicitly contextualising the audience and performer’s relationship goes a long way in justifying the show’s message by making it clear why we’re receiving the writer’s story.

    Tabby Lamb uses this device in her Gluten Free Chocolate Crispy Caramel Mini Bite, also performed by Malone. In this play – the third in the programme – we’re waiting for a bus to go to a trans rights protest. In this chatty, big-hearted ode to living your truth, we are reminded of the importance of finding our chosen family and not being a transphobic bigot. Like in Reptile, Malone effectively balances delicacy with strength, and vulnerability with fight. Both of her characters are immensely engaging, and allow time and space for the audience to give as well as receive.

    Unlike Gluten Free Chocolate Crispy Caramel Mini Bite, the two pieces performed by Ryan Lane centre characters trapped in their homes. Share-My-Home Companion by Gabriella Leon is the first of Lane’s performances, where he plays a surrealist eccentric habituating an absurd world somewhere between Beckett, Dali and Duchamp. Here, words are reinvented, deconstructed and relished. There’s also stacks and stacks of toilet paper. Linear time also seems to no longer exist, so it can be hard to keep up with the circus inside the character’s head as he demands engagement with his word play. With the normal rules of the world seemingly suspended, this is a disorientating and fast piece, though one that relishes the ridiculous.

    This heightened-ness is also present in the last of the four plays, The Recluse Who Lives On A Hill. An aged Hollywood diva has finally granted the press an interview, and after what is likely decades of never leaving her house and only having her memories for company, she finally has someone to talk to. She’s a bursting dam of micro-stories, anecdotes and distrust for the audience/reporter, but there’s also a feeling that she could turn on you at any moment. She’s an utter delight, but also dangerous. It’s partly exhilarating, partly intimidating, and wholly telling us off for not paying enough attention to our elders.

    The whole Theatre for Two package is an innovative response to the pandemic, though the dramaturgies and design are comfortingly familiar and recogniseable as 1:1 performances from the before times. Tightly curated and directed by Ed Theakston, the event is thematically unified but with enough variation to keep interest piqued. Though regular interaction with the characters means that there are some moments that are uncomfortable due to trying to work out the ‘correct’ response, the event is a compelling character study with important and relevant stories.

    Theatre for Two tours through July.

    The Play’s the Thing UK is committed to covering fringe and progressive theatre in London and beyond. It is run entirely voluntarily and needs regular support to ensure its survival. For more information and to help The Play’s the Thing UK provide coverage of the theatre that needs reviews the most, visit its patreon.

uk Theatre blogs

UK Theatre Blogs

17 June 2021

UK Theatre Blogs UK Theatre Blogs
  • Book Review: Hamilton & Me – Giles Terera
    17 June 2021

    Guest reviewer: Michaela Clement-Hayes

    Audience members don’t always appreciate the time and effort that goes into making a West End or Broadway performance. It’s a lot of fun, but it’s also a lot of hard work. The months spent learning lines, choreography and music, lengthy rehearsals, techs and previews are only a small part of it.

    Actors ask themselves many questions during this process: How does one interpret a character? And, how do you make your interpretation unique? Why does the character says a line, how do they say it, and what are they doing when they say it? And, what are they thinking? In Hamilton and Me, Giles Terera shares his personal story and relationship with Hamilton and his character, Aaron Burr. It covers how he auditioned for the role of ‘the villain’ and the journey he went on in order to understand and embody him on stage.

    Hamilton in the US is one thing, but to a British audience it’s very different. We haven’t grown up learning the history of the Founding Fathers. Many of us only know who Alexander Hamilton is because of this musical. The pressure for the West End cast to learn this history was immense.

    I was there on opening night. I hadn’t listened to the soundtrack, and I was sceptical of the whole thing. And yet, the minute the show started with Terera asking ‘How..?’, I was blown away. Terera is a truly wonderful performer, but in this book we really see him as an actor, son and friend. He shares his methodical and detailed approach to becoming Burr, along with the excitement, the fear and the frustration. It’s a rare insight behind the scenes, and it’s fascinating.

    Compiled from notes he kept throughout his time with Hamilton, from the audition to afterwards, his journal is raw and refreshing. The mask is off and we see the true meaning of a professional performer. The book is well-written, relatable and engaging, with plenty of photographs to help visualise the whole experience. If you’re a fan of Hamilton, an aspiring actor, or just a lover of history, this book will inspire you to take a look at those characters and performers you admire and see them in a different way.

    The Play’s the Thing UK is committed to covering fringe and progressive theatre in London and beyond. It is run entirely voluntarily and needs regular support to ensure its survival. For more information and to help The Play’s the Thing UK provide coverage of the theatre that needs reviews the most, visit its patreon.

  • Review: Doctor Who – Time Fracture
    17 June 2021
    It’s the end of the universe – so of course Doctor Who – Time Fracture is utterly chaotic. It is also rather good fun.

    “The gateway is active”

    Time Fracture isn’t the first time Doctor Who has ventured into the world of immersive theatre. Punchdrunk’s The Crash of the Elysium was a triumph a decade ago so it’s about time (and relative dimension in space) that we got another and fresh from the success of their Gatsby experience, Immersive Everywhere have launched this huge new immersive endeavour. A time bomb has been dropped in 1940s London but its cataclysmic explosion is only due in the near future. Only us – a team of volunteers recruited by the Doctor – can save the day – sonic screwdrivers at the ready.

    The need for #spoilers means that I can’t give too much away but the show takes full advantage of the cracks in time caused by the bomb falling to offer up vignettes that involve major historical figures, explore far-future technological innovation and nod to the rich and varied legacy of Doctor Who and its iconic characters. I can safely say I had two properly wish-I-could-hide-behind-the-sofa moments – one of which is ingeniously staged late on – and two hairs-on-end moments, one of which reconfirming just how brilliant Jodie Whittaker’s Doctor is.

    As with many an immersive show in which you’re finding your own way, albeit assisted by any number of Time Lord Guides, you kinda need to make peace with the individual nature of that journey. A number of finely stocked bars help to grease the wheels, especially the one with the Silurian cabaret singer, but there’s always going to be elements of the show that you miss out on and I’m not quite sure that the fairly leisurely pace of the whole thing would bear the return visits needed to explore each storyline.

    Given the nature of the main storyline, Time Fracture’s innate chaos does feel appropriate, especially when allied with the tense atmosphere of the opening segment. It’s a bit of a shame that that intensity doesn’t always follow through to the rest of the show which is ultimately more amiable than arresting. Logistically, the interval might be needed but dramatically, it saps energy and results in a final sequence that feels a little too padded out and awkwardly defined (I’m still not 100% sure how I ended up on the side of the **** *****!) despite its awesome cameos and iconic costume recreation.  

    The level of world-building here though is sensational. Rebecca Brower’s production design is an absolute treasure trove of visual cues and tributes to the full breadth of Doctor Who’s storied history. And director Tom Maller has instilled a marvellous sense of enthusiasm into his cast from Ood to Omega as they gamely encourage our participation with the occasional note of peril chiming like the Cloister Bell. Because, you know, the universe is ending, once you’ve finished your cocktail that is. 

    Running time: 2 hours 15 minutes (with interval)
    Photos: Mark Senior
    Time Fracture is  booking until 17th Aprril 2022
  • ‘Quietly roars its pain for all the lives lost’: UNDER THE MASK – Theatre Peckham & Touring
    17 June 2021

    Given that you can’t help but expect that there’s going to be a whole lotta Covid plays coming along soon, there’s a balancing act to be made about the approach to a global pandemic that is still very much a clear and present danger. Under the Mask takes the route of almost documentary realism as junior doctor and new writer Shaan Sahota very much writes what she knows.

    A Tamasha and Oxford Playhouse co-production, opening its UK tour at Theatre Peckham, Under the Mask invites audiences to an audio experience, taking us back to the beginning of the first wave of the Coronavirus pandemic in the UK. Viewed through the scarcely believing eyes of newly qualified doctor Jaskaran who is fast-tracked onto the Intensive Care Unit, it’s a haunting tale of lived experience.

    And because Sahota is writing so personally about something still so current, that documentary approach does feel most appropriate. This is a measured play that quietly roars its pain for all the lives lost and the superhuman efforts of the NHS staff who had, and still have, to pay quite the personal cost. To quibble about dramatic impetus and narrative thrust feels vulgar as heavens knows there will be time enough to explore Covid in a more theatrical manner.

    As it is, director Sita Thomas employs a delicate touch to keep us from pure reportage, utilising key aspects of a soundscape recorded live in hospital wards to immerse us in that feels all-too-scarily familiar. And Aysha Kala leads the impressive voice cast as Jaskaran who bears the full brunt of being in the firing line of a national health crisis with both eloquence and exasperation, learning on the spot how to care just enough for her patients but also for herself.

    Ashley Bale’s lighting design undulates effectively as we shift from bedside Skype calls to frustrated staff meetings, from wearying ward runs lacking hope to visits home trying to isolate from concerned parents. Though care has been taken to avoid the piece from ever becoming too overwhelming in its depiction of an ongoing tragedy, an hour seems about right to remind us of the utter paucity of a clap on the doorstep.

    Running time: 60 minutes (without interval)
    Photos: Geraint Lewis
    Under the Mask is booking at Theatre Peckham until 18th June then tours to Theatr Clwyd, 30th June — 3rd July; Liverpool Playhouse, 8th July — 10th July; Oxford Playhouse, 12th July — 15th July and Rose Theatre Kingston, 21st July — 25th July

    Adblock test (Why?)

  • ‘All the more relevant in a post-Brexit world’: THE WYRE LADY OF FLEETWOOD – Brighton Fringe (Online review)
    17 June 2021

    In Lita Doolan’s new play The Wyre Lady of Fleetwood, the Wyre Lady refers to a real-life pleasure boat in the seaside fishing port of Fleetwood, just down the promenade from the holiday resort of Blackpool.

    The Lady dates back to 1938 and has been in her present place since 1971, albeit hit by an arson attack in 2020 and restored for relaunch early this year. She is a constant marker of her people.

    The play is set in the long shadow of the 1980 cod fishing crisis which struck Fleetwood after the loss of Icelandic supply chains: if this sounds at all familiar in our post-Brexit world, then this makes Doolan’s show all the more relevant, even in passing.

    However, this is a piece about family, primarily, set in a North which is slowly changing, declining and redefining itself. There is loss, there is the return of one who has been away, there are memories which remain sharp.

    The cast – Julie Broadbent, Ian McShee, Bhasker Patel, Jo Phillips-Lane, Mabel Pritchard – are all convincing in their depiction of inhabitants of the land ruled by the sea. These are characters we can recognise easily, and they gain our interest and empathy.

    The story is less convincing as a whole, sadly, perhaps because it assumes a certain amount of local knowledge which not every audience member will have, and sometimes lacks cohesion between the different viewpoints (there are no scenes which are not performed solo).

    There is, of course, a lot of love for the local lore and the wildness of nature, as well as memory of families. The play opens with the recollection of a funeral of a patriarch, but goes deeper into the recognition of the changing face of Fleetwood’s community.

    Fringe rating: ***

    The Wyre Lady of Fleetwood is a premiere piece which deserves a wider platform in the future as it develops from its current half-hour running time – you can see it online throughout the Brighton Fringe. Book your free ticket here.

    Adblock test (Why?)

  • NEWS: Birmingham Royal Ballet 2021/22 programme features classic & contemporary versions of Romeo & Juliet
    17 June 2021

    Following Birmingham Royal Ballet’s return to live performance with the Curated by Carlos season and Cinderella at Birmingham Repertory Theatre and Theatre Royal Plymouth, director Carlos Acosta again balances the new and the classic in a season that begins with contrasting tellings of, arguably, the greatest love story ever told.

    For Birmingham Royal Ballet’s homecoming season at Birmingham Hippodrome (6-9 October 2021), audiences will be treated to Kenneth MacMillan’s passionate Romeo and Juliet choreography and Prokofiev’s glorious score in this enduringly popular, classic interpretation of Shakespeare’s tragedy. Performances at Plymouth Theatre Royal take place from 27-30 October.

    Carlos Curates: R&J Reimagined sees Romeo and Juliet get a very different treatment with the Company premiere of Romanian choreographer Edward Clug’s Radio and Juliet, a reinvention of the classic story set to the music of Radiohead, featuring tracks from Kid A, Amnesiac and OK Computer (14-16 October). This version explores what could have happened if Juliet decided not to take her own life, and is an exhilarating, emotional rollercoaster that has toured the world to widespread acclaim since its premiere in 2005.

    Radio and Juliet forms a double bill with a new work from Birmingham-based choreographer Rosie Kay, details to be announced.

    Carlos Acosta said:

    “Shakespeare’s timeless story of love and passion has inspired so many versions over the centuries, not least translated into dance. We’re exploring some of this rich reinterpretation in our double bill Carlos Curates: R&J Reimagined, also in October.

    “I really love Edward Clug’s contemporary reinvention of the story and I’m also thrilled that we are continuing to build relationships with other Birmingham arts companies and that we’ll be joined by Rosie Kay Dance Company who will complete this exciting programme.’

    October sees the postponed and adapted London run of Curated by Carlos at Sadler’s Wells (4-6 November). The triple bill now opens with the Company’s love letter to Birmingham: City of a Thousand Trades, a new one-act abstract ballet inspired by and celebrating the richly diverse cultural and industrial heritage of the place it calls home.

    Commissioned as part of Birmingham Royal Ballet’s Ballet Now programme and produced in association with The REP, City of a Thousand Trades was created by choreographer Miguel Altunaga and co-directed with The REP associate director, Madeleine Kludje, with music inspired by the city’s soundscape, including its legacy as the birthplace of Heavy Metal, composed by Mathias Coppens and performed live by the Royal Ballet Sinfonia, with designs by Guilia Scrimieri and lighting by Michael Lee-Woolley.

    Brazilian/British choreographer Daniela Cardim’s Imminent, also a Ballet Now commission, has been created with a team of international talent, including composer Paul Englishby, designer April Dalton, dramaturg Lou Cope, assistant choreographer Peter Leung and lighting designer Peter Teigen.

    Completing the triple bill, Goyo Montero’s Chacona gets reworked for the London stage and features the world premiere of a new duet created for Carlos Acosta and Alessandra Ferri. Having danced Manon together in Havana many years ago, this duet sees two of the all time greats reunited. Ferri said: “We always wanted to do more together but never had the opportunity. Really I think this is a dream come true for both of us.”

    Goyo Montero’s thrillingly physical work Chacona is set to music by J.S. Bach and performed live on stage by violin, guitar and piano, together with 16 dancers.

    For spring 2022, Acosta promises entertainment for all ages when he brings an explosion of Spanish sunshine, spectacular dance and vivacious comedy to stages across the country.

    In a new production created especially for Birmingham Royal Ballet, Don Quixote introduces us to Cervantes’ famous knight himself, lovers Kitri and Basilio, and a host of supporting characters. The first UK performances of Acosta’s sparkling new 21st century production of this 19th century masterpiece take place from 18-26 February.

    This festive season, Birmingham Royal Ballet will bring The Nutcracker back to two stages. Birmingham Hippodrome welcomes the return of Clara and the Sugar Plum Fairy 20 November-11 December and the Company will celebrate its fourth appearance at the Royal Albert Hall from 28 to 31 December.

    The Royal Albert Hall production features Simon Callow as the voice of Clara’s mysterious godfather, Drosselmeyer, and video and projection by Tony-Award-winning 59 Productions (An American in Paris, War Horse). Birmingham Royal Ballet’s superb dancers and the Royal Ballet Sinfonia “weave their magic with the timeless choreography and glorious Tchaikovsky score to create a quintessential Christmas treat for all the family”.

  • Playlist: ET radio show 16 June 2021
    17 June 2021
    Interview with Aaron-Lee Eyles on ‘I Didnt Want This, I Just Wanted You’

    You can also find a written interview with Aaron here

    Shows, Venues & Theatre Companies mentioned Music Playlist
    • Beastie Boys – Sabotage
    • Audioweb – Bankrobber
    • Big Audio Dynamite – Can’t Wait/ Live
    • Finding Rhythms – Change – available via the charity’s bandcamp page here
    • Peter Doherty & The Puta Madres – Paradise Is Under Your Nose
    • Unkle feat Damon Gough – Nursery Rhyme Breather
    • Frank Turner – Don’t Worry
    • Goat Girl – P.T.S.Tea
    • Bombay Bicycle Club – Carry Me
    • My Life Story – World Citizen
    • Busdriver – Unemployed Black Astronaut
    • The Streets feat. Idles – None Of Us Are Getting Out Of This Alive
    • Young Fathers – Nest
    • Sage Francis – Lie Detector Test
    • Dan Le Sac Vs Scroobius Pip – Beat That My Heart Skipped
    • The White Stripes – Feel in Love With A Girl
    • Metermaids – Advice I Know You Won’t Follow – check out the video here
    • Imogen Stirling – White
    • Kae Tempest – Tunnel Vision
    • The Beloved – Hello
    • The National – Nobody Else Will Be There

    The post Playlist: ET radio show 16 June 2021 appeared first on Everything Theatre.

  • Review: Under the Mask, Theatre Peckham
    16 June 2021
    Playing at Theatre Peckham before a UK tour, Tamasha Theatre’s Under the Mask – written by a junior doctor – is a haunting revisit of the early days of the pandemic

    “I’m telling you now I don’t feel safe”

    Given that you can’t help but expect that there’s going to be a whole lotta COVID plays coming along soon, there’s a balancing act to be made about the approach to a global pandemic that is still very much a clear and present danger. Under the Mask takes the route of almost documentary realism as junior doctor and new writer Shaan Sahota very much writes what she knows.

    A Tamasha and Oxford Playhouse co-production, opening its UK tour at Theatre Peckham, Under the Mask invites audiences to an audio experience, taking us back to the beginning of the first wave of the Coronavirus pandemic in the UK. Viewed through the scarcely believing eyes of newly qualified doctor Jaskaran who is fast-tracked onto the Intensive Care Unit, it’s a haunting tale of lived experience.

    And because Sahota is writing so personally about something still so current, that documentary approach does feel most appropriate. This is a measured play that quietly roars its pain for all the lives lost and the superhuman efforts of the NHS staff who had, and still have, to pay quite the personal cost. To quibble about dramatic impetus and narrative thrust feels vulgar as heavens knows there will be time enough to explore COVID in a more theatrical manner.

    As it is, director Sita Thomas employs a delicate touch to keep us from pure reportage, utilising key aspects of a soundscape recorded live in hospital wards to immerse us in that feels all-too-scarily familiar. And Aysha Kala leads the impressive voice cast as Jaskaran who bears the full brunt of being in the firing line of a national health crisis with both eloquence and exasperation, learning on the spot how to care just enough for her patients but also for herself.

    Ashley Bale’s lighting design undulates effectively as we shift from bedside Skype calls to frustrated staff meetings, from wearying ward runs lacking hope to visits home trying to isolate from concerned parents. Though care has been taken to avoid the piece from ever becoming too overwhelming in its depiction of an ongoing tragedy, an hour seems about right to remind us of the utter paucity of a clap on the doorstep.  

    Running time: 60 minutes (without interval)
    Photos: Geraint Lewis
    Under the Mask is booking at Theatre Peckham until 18th June then tours to Theatr Clwyd, 30th June — 3rd July; Liverpool Playhouse, 8th July — 10th July; Oxford Playhouse, 12th July — 15th July and Rose Theatre Kingston, 21st July — 25th July
  • The Prince Of Egypt confirms it will re-open on 1st July
    16 June 2021

    By Douglas Mayo

    Hit musical The Prince Of Egypt has confirmed that it will re-open at London’s Dominion Theatre on 1st July 2021 in accordance with Step 3 protocols with social distancing in place. Luke Brady and Liam Tamne and the cast of The Prince Of Egypt. Photo: Tristram Kenton

    The Prince Of Egypt, the hit musical based on the classic DreamWorks Animation film, is proud to confirm the complete cast, orchestra and company of 154 who will lead “the huge popular hit” (LBC) back into London’s Dominion Theatre in 16 days, in accordance with UK Government Step 3 protocols (socially distanced audiences), as previously announced.  Book now for Prince Of Egypt.

    “Brought to life in truly epic fashion” (Daily Mirror), the Grammy® Award-nominated musical will resume performances on Thursday 1 July 2021 with tickets currently on sale until Saturday 8 January 2022. Performances between Thursday 1 July and Saturday 4 September 2021 will operate with socially distanced audiences throughout the venue and, thereafter, in accordance with Step 4 protocols (full capacity but in compliance with UK Government public health guidance). Should all current restrictions be lifted earlier, the production will revert to full capacity as soon as practicably possible.

    Journey through the wonders of Ancient Egypt as two young men, raised together as brothers in a kingdom of privilege, find themselves suddenly divided by a secret past. One must rule as Pharaoh, the other must rise up and free his true people; both face a destiny that will change history forever.

    Joining the previously announced Clive Rowe (Jethro), will be new ensemble cast members Catherine Cornwall (a 2019 Bird College graduate), Daniel Luiz (a 2021 Mountview graduate) and Samuel Sarpong-Broni (a 2020 Royal College of Music graduate). All three will be making their West End debuts.

    The cast of 46 will be lead by Luke Brady (Moses), Liam Tamne (Ramses), Christine Allado (Tzipporah), Alexia Khadime (Miriam), Joe Dixon (Seti), Debbie Kurup (Tuya), Clive Rowe* (Jethro), Mercedesz Csampai (Yocheved), Adam Pearce (Hotep), Tanisha Spring** (Nefertari), Silas Wyatt-Barke (Aaron), Simbi Akande, Casey Al-Shaqsy, Joe Atkinson, Danny Becker, Felipe Bejarano, Pàje Campbell, Catherine Cornwall, Adam Filipe, Soophia Foroughi, Natalie Green, Jack Harrison-Cooper, Kalene Jeans, Christian Knight, Jessica Lee, Oliver Lidert, Daniel Luiz, Jay Marsh, Scott Maurice, Carly Miles, Alice Readie, Samuel Sarpong-Broni, Christopher Short, Molly Smith, Ricardo Walker, Danny Williams, Niko Wirachman and Sasha Woodward together with young performers Cian Eagle-Service, Maiya Eastmond, Jersey Blu Georgia, Taylor Jenkins, Mia Lakha, George Menezes Cutts, Iman Pabani and Vishal Soni. *Clive Rowe appears until 16 Oct 2021 / **Tanisha Spring appears until 18 Sept 2021

    The orchestra will be Dave Rose (Musical Director); Mark Collins (Associate Musical Director, Keyboards); Nina Foster/Fiona McCapra (job share), Sonya Fairbairn, Penny Ainscow, Sebastian Rudnicki (Violins); Fiona Davies (Viola); Magda Pietraszewska (Cello); Rory Dempsey (Bass); Rupert Widdows (Woodwind); Tony Cross (Trumpet, Flugelhorn); Duncan Fuller, David McQueen (Horns); John Gregson (Guitars); Murdoch MacDonald (Percussion) and Dan Ellis (Drums).

    Liam Tamne. Photo: Tristram Kenton

    The Stage Management team will be Anthony Field (Company Stage Manager); Dominique Pierre-Louis (Stage Manager); Ryan Quelch (Deputy Stage Manager); Nuri Chang, Charlotte Johnson (Assistant Stage Managers/Book Cover); Simon Humphris, Chrissie Huxford and Tracey Farrell (Assistant Stage Managers), who, together with a further 84 backstage staff, complete the production’s huge cast, orchestra and company of 154.

    Producers DreamWorks Theatricals, Michael McCabe and Neil Laidlaw said in a joint statement: “On behalf of our authors, creative team and co-producers, we are proud to welcome back our exceptional company of 154 individuals and to once again deliver live performances of this epic theatrical re-imagining of the classic DreamWorks Animation film. While initial performances will be in front of socially distanced audiences, we, as one of the West End’s biggest shows and employers, will need a Government-backed insurance scheme against future COVID-related shutdowns and to move to full capacity at the earliest possible opportunity. In the meantime, we look forward to audiences returning from 1 July to the comfort and COVID-secure environment of the Dominion Theatre.”

    “This lavish stage adaptation” (The Guardian) of the classic DreamWorks Animation film features a cast and orchestra of more than 60 artists and Stephen Schwartz’s acclaimed score includes his Academy Award®-winning song When You Believe, which was a global hit for Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey, and the “spine-tingling” (Time Out) Deliver Us. The Original Cast Recording, released by Ghostlight Records, received a 2021 Grammy® Award nomination for `Best Musical Theatre Album’.

    The Prince of Egypt has music and lyrics by multi-Grammy® and Academy Award®-winner Stephen Schwartz (Wicked, Godspell), a book by Philip LaZebnik (Mulan, Pocahontas) and features 10 new songs written by Stephen Schwartz together with 5 of his beloved songs from the DreamWorks Animation film (When You Believe, Deliver Us, All I Ever Wanted, Through Heaven’s Eyes and The Plagues).

    The Prince of Egypt is directed by Scott Schwartz with choreography by Sean Cheesman; set designs by Kevin Depinet; costume designs by Ann Hould-Ward; lighting design by Mike Billings; sound design by Gareth Owen; projection designs by Jon Driscoll; illusions by Chris Fisher; wigs, hair and makeup design by Campbell Young Associates; orchestrations by August Eriksmoen; musical supervision and arrangements by Dominick Amendum; musical direction by Dave Rose; casting by Jim Arnold CDG and children’s casting by Verity Naughton CDG.

    BOOK TICKETS FOR THE PRINCE OF EGYPT

    This post The Prince Of Egypt confirms it will re-open on 1st July first appeared on British Theatre. Hurrah!

  • ‘An innovative response to the pandemic’: THEATRE FOR TWO – Stanley Arts
    16 June 2021

    In the middle of a dark room, I am ushered into what looks like a largish, stand-alone cupboard. With a spotlight above a single chair facing a perspex sheet covered with a window blind, there is an immediate sense of the audience becoming the performer. Given that the four mini-plays making up this event are semi-improvised character pieces relying on audience interaction, this feeling is apt. As much the playlets are highly theatrical and often disarming, they are also intimate and conversational.

    In a time where many of us are learning how to just be in the same space as another person, unmediated by a computer screen, Theatre for Two is comforting and familiar as well as challenging what has become a normal disconnect from people and the world we live in.

    Two actors each perform two of the shows. Mary Malone is up first in Macadie Amoroso’s Reptile as someone taking it day-by-day after a break-up. Or rather, taking it glass of wine by glass of wine. Feeling lonely and detatched from the world, she looks for meaning and connection from whoever and whatever she finds in the safety of her bedroom. She’s also fighting the urge to call her ex, but girl, we know that never ends well. There’s a clever reveal that firmly assigns an identity to the audience rather than leaving questions unanswered about who she’s talking to. Though often left out of solo performances, explicitly contextualising the audience and performer’s relationship goes a long way in justifying the show’s message by making it clear why we’re receiving the writer’s story.

    Tabby Lamb uses this device in her Gluten Free Chocolate Crispy Caramel Mini Bite, also performed by Malone. In this play – the third in the programme – we’re waiting for a bus to go to a trans rights protest. In this chatty, big-hearted ode to living your truth, we are reminded of the importance of finding our chosen family and not being a transphobic bigot. Like in Reptile, Malone effectively balances delicacy with strength, and vulnerability with fight. Both of her characters are immensely engaging, and allow time and space for the audience to give as well as receive.

    Unlike Gluten Free Chocolate Crispy Caramel Mini Bite, the two pieces performed by Ryan Lane centre characters trapped in their homes. Share-My-Home Companion by Gabriella Leon is the first of Lane’s performances, where he plays a surrealist eccentric habituating an absurd world somewhere between Beckett, Dali and Duchamp. Here, words are reinvented, deconstructed and relished. There’s also stacks and stacks of toilet paper. Linear time also seems to no longer exist, so it can be hard to keep up with the circus inside the character’s head as he demands engagement with his word play. With the normal rules of the world seemingly suspended, this is a disorientating and fast piece, though one that relishes the ridiculous.

    This heightened-ness is also present in the last of the four plays, The Recluse Who Lives On A Hill. An aged Hollywood diva has finally granted the press an interview, and after what is likely decades of never leaving her house and only having her memories for company, she finally has someone to talk to. She’s a bursting dam of micro-stories, anecdotes and distrust for the audience/reporter, but there’s also a feeling that she could turn on you at any moment. She’s an utter delight, but also dangerous. It’s partly exhilarating, partly intimidating, and wholly telling us off for not paying enough attention to our elders.

    The whole Theatre for Two package is an innovative response to the pandemic, though the dramaturgies and design are comfortingly familiar and recogniseable as 1:1 performances from the before times. Tightly curated and directed by Ed Theakston, the event is thematically unified but with enough variation to keep interest piqued. Though regular interaction with the characters means that there are some moments that are uncomfortable due to trying to work out the ‘correct’ response, the event is a compelling character study with important and relevant stories.

    Theatre for Two tours through July.

    The Play’s the Thing UK is committed to covering fringe and progressive theatre in London and beyond. It is run entirely voluntarily and needs regular support to ensure its survival. For more information and to help The Play’s the Thing UK provide coverage of the theatre that needs reviews the most, visit its patreon.

  • ‘Farcical fun all the way’: The Three Musketeers… attempted by Foolhardy (Online review)
    16 June 2021

    Heavily promoted on the strength of Robert Lindsay’s involvement in the cast, this audio-animated adaptation of The Three Musketeers owes more to parody and pastiche than any serious attempt to translate the story into digital form.

    There are occasional live action pieces, but these are staged for humorous effect (cast members wander off, mobile phones ring, the star never stops complaining). Sydney Stevenson has written the ‘Musketeers Goes Wrong’, effectively. And it is fun.

    Lindsay is the narrator of the piece, which is produced and adapted by one “David Du Lesley” for Foolhardy Productions (who have “attempted” the show).

    The others lending their voices to this classic tale include David Bedella (in the small role of the King) and all find the right balance of ennui and professional commitment. This is an adaptation that rises or falls on the quality of the voice artists, and it definitely delivers.

    I found the animation style by Barbara Owczarek initially a little odd – no character is drawn or seen except a horse, yet the backgrounds and effects are incredibly detailed, with lots of in-jokes and “easter eggs”. Movement is suggested by a quick shake of the scene or a moving cloud representing a fight.

    We have to use our imaginations to fill in the gaps where the Musketeers, Milady (Dianne Pilkington), and the rest of the cast of characters should be. After a while, it does begin to work, and the style has a definite charm and flair, clearly influenced by the cut-out animation tradition.

    Antony Eden’s Du Lesley (all the cast except Lindsay are given fake acting names as well as characters) is appealingly awful as the hapless director – in real-life the piece is under the direction of Joseph O’Malley. He picks the plum role of D’Artagnan for himself, and the new, keen, if blundering, musketeer gets some plum pieces.

    I was reminded very clearly of Richard Lester’s Musketeers films of the 1970s which took the Dumas book and made it into a riotous, if fairly faithful adaptation. Stevenson’s version is farcical fun all the way, and the actors run with it.

    The Three Musketeers … attempted by Foolhardy is available until 27 June 2021 – book your ticket here (£15).

    Image credit: Mark Senior

    Adblock test (Why?)

Theatre podcasts

Theatre Podcasts

17 June 2021

Theatre Podcasts Theatre Podcasts
  • Today on Broadway: Thursday, June 17, 2021
    17 June 2021
    “Book of Mormon” and “Freestyle Love Supreme” Are Officially Back To Broadway, A New Site For Theatre Diversity Launches “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is appreciated:  Ashley Steves This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. read more
  • Today on Broadway: Wednesday, June 16, 2021
    16 June 2021
    Equity and the League Announce Touring Safety Protocols, Harvey Donates $2.5 Million to NYPL, Atlantic Announces 2021-22 Season “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is appreciated:  Ashley Steves This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | read more
  • Today on Broadway: Tuesday, June 15, 2021
    15 June 2021
    UK Halts Theatre Re-Opening,  Muny Announces Exciting Casting, LMM Responds to Colorism Criticism of “ITH” Film “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is appreciated:  Ashley Steves This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | @ItsGraceAkiJames Marino read more
  • Episode 287: In The Heights gets Broadwaysted!
    15 June 2021

    PIRAGUA!

    Play along as Aaron J Albano (Newsies, Hamilton), Hayley Podschun (Hello, Dolly, Hairspray), and Nikisha Williams (Hamilton, The Color Purple) join Bryan, Kevin, and Kimberly to break down the 'In The Heights' movie musical. Come for the bad puns and wine but stay for the movie musical talk and beer.

    Become a supporter on our Patreon: https://bit.ly/2Q2zELG

    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

  • Alex J. Dean - Young Actor and Director Graduates from Film School During a Pandemic
    14 June 2021

    Being a coach and leading master classes has been something I truly enjoyed doing. Imparting my experience and insights to students and watching them have those a-ha moments and discovering something new about themselves or their own skills and talents. But sometimes it’s good to flip that around and ask those just starting out their career what THEY have learned so far and where THEY see not only themselves going in this career but where the industry is going as a whole. So for the next three episodes I’m going to be talking to young artists about what they’ve discovered along their own journeys.

    And I begin today with actor, writer, director, and producer Alex J Dean, who is actually graduating from film school this month. What a time to be starting an arts career, huh? But as you listen to our conversation I think you’ll recognize that he has a pretty good head on his shoulders that will enable him to navigate these very strange and tumultuous times.

    Sign up for the monthly WINMI Newsletter

    Alex started out as an actor on stage and on screen, and was co-host of the award-winning Nerdtabulous series. Even in real life he has embraced the nerd moniker, as a fan of Star Wars, the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and Japanese anime. So it should come as no surprise that Alex has found a real home behind the camera as a director and writer, creating worlds and stories from his own imagination. His final thesis project for college was a horror anthology film, with plans to release it later this summer or early in the fall under his own production company Penny Arcade Pictures.

    So suffice it to say, Alex loves to stay busy and immerse himself and creativity and production. But as you and I know this is certainly a tough time to get started in the arts field, and that is where we begin our conversation today.

    Follow Alex - IMDB / Instagram 

    Join WINMI and get Members-Only Episodes on Supercast

    Check out Artist Resources and Offers

    Follow WINMI - Instagram / Twitter 

    ----------

    Why I’ll Never Make It is a Top 25 Theater Podcast on Feedspot, and is also a part of Helium Radio Network and a member of the Broadway Makers Alliance. Music in the episode by Borrtex is used under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

  • Today on Broadway: Monday, June 14, 2021
    14 June 2021
    Katori Hall’s “The Hot Wing King” Wins Pulitzer Prize, Actors Fund Re-Elects Stokes, What B’way Shows Haven’t Announced Returns “Today on Broadway” is a daily, Monday through Friday, podcast hitting the top theatre headlines of the day. Any and all feedback is appreciated:  Ashley Steves This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | @NoThisIsAshleyGrace Aki This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. read more
  • This Week on Broadway for June 13, 2021: Marilyn Maye
    13 June 2021
    Peter Filichia, Jena Tesse Fox, James Marino, and Michael Portantiere talk with Marilyn Maye. This Week on Broadway has been coming to you every week since 2009. It is the longest running Broadway and theatrical podcast with hundreds of shows giving thousands of reviews and interviews. Subscribe to BroadwayRadio in read more
  • REVELATIONS by JuCoby Johnson
    13 June 2021

    Mahalia, a Black trans woman, returns to her hometown of Minneapolis during the tumultuous summer of 2020. Against a backdrop of fire and protest, she and her father tentatively rekindle a long-dormant bond.

    REVELATIONS is written by JuCoby Johnson (How It’s Gon’ Be) and directed by Goldie E. Patrick (Paradise Blue). It stars Lady Dane Figueroa Edidi (Klytmnestra: An Epic Slam Poem), John Douglas Thompson (Public Theater’s Julius Caesar), and Lynnette R. Freeman (Ensemble Studio Theatre).

  • Prasanna Puwanarajah
    12 June 2021

    Prasanna Puwanarajah is an actor, director and writer, working across theatre, film and television. He also happens to be a fully trained medical doctor..who is also writing a graphic novel. We thought someone with so many different hats might be well placed to offer a unique perspective on the experience of making theatre, and he doesn’t disappoint.

    From the solitary life of the writer, to the first flag in the ground at the beginning of rehearsals, through to the joys of tech, this time viewed from both sides of the footlights, we embrace the unknowable...and also discover that you’re not really wet until your pants are wet.

  • All The Drama: “Why Marry?”, 1918 Winner, Pulitzer Prize for Drama
    12 June 2021
    All The Drama is hosted by Jan Simpson. It is a series of deep dives into the plays that have won The Pulitzer Prize for Drama. The Pulitzer Prize for Drama: Why Marry? “Why Marry?” Wikipedia pagehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Why_Marry Playwright Jesse Lynch Williams Wikipedia pagehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesse_Lynch_Williams Triangle Club at Princeton (which was co-founded read more

Theatre magazines

Theatre Magazines

17 June 2021

Theatre Magazines Theatre Magazines
  • Off-Broadway's Cherry Lane Reopens June 17 With Return of Jacqueline Novak: Get on Your Knees
    17 June 2021
    John Early directs the limited engagement.
  • Places Please Project Hopes to Offer $500,000 in Rent Relief to NYC Theatre Workers
    17 June 2021
    The group is co-founded by Lilli Cooper, Kyle Jarrow, Andrew Lippa, and Annie Schiffmann.
  • Introducing the July 2021 issue of Limelight
    17 June 2021

    Next month, many of you will doubtless be participating in Dry July. But as opera lovers will tell you, you don’t actually need to be imbibing in order to feel intoxicated – just listen to some of the great operas instead. In our cover feature, Musical Inebriation, Mahima Macchione raises a glass to opera’s love affair with all things alcoholic, and explores how drinking and drunkenness play their part in so many operatic plots.

    The July 2021 edition of Limelight. Subscribe by Sunday 20 July to receive a copy.

    In the feature River Deep, Mountain High, Harriet Cunningham gets the lowdown on the Australian Chamber Orchestra’s next musical and cinematic odyssey River, which follows in the wake of the hugely successful project Mountain. Talking to ACO Artistic Director Richard Tognetti, film director Jennifer Peedom, and stage director Nigel Jamieson, Cunningham discovers how River – which combines an environmental film with an eclectic soundtrack – came together and how it will, hopefully, attract new audiences to the concert hall.

    Until recently, Virginia Gay didn’t dare think of herself as a writer. But as Steve Dow reveals in his feature The Write Stuff, 2020 turned out to be a very constructive year for the much-loved actor. Despite contracting COVID-19 while in Los Angeles, she wrote two stage plays – an adaptation of Edmond Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac and a pantomime – both of which are soon to be staged. Cyrano will have season at Melbourne Theatre Company from 31 July, and The Boomkak Panto will run at Belvoir St Theatre in November/December.

    Previous
    Next

    In our fourth feature, A Career to Trumpet, Vincent Plush salutes Paul Goodchild, the doyen of Australian brass. In August 2020, after being diagnosed with cancer, Goodchild retired from the Sydney Symphony Orchestra where he had been Principal Trumpet since 1985, following in the footsteps of his father Cliff who was SSO’s Principal Tuba for 36 years. The two old friends discuss Goodchild’s life and career, his mentor Richard Gill, his fear that the brass band is a dying art form, and his love of wine.

    In this month’s In the Limelight, Felix Wilcox has written an article called Programming Must Get With the Program. In May, Ciaran Frame wrote an article for our website about his 2020 Living Music Report in which he analysed Australia’s orchestral programming to see if it adequately reflects the Australian identity and our gender, cultural and First Nations diversity. Frame found that in 2020 the answer was “not yet”. Wilcox – who is Senior Lecturer in Music and Sound Design at University of Technology Sydney, and a composer – has written an in-depth article in which she argues that orchestras must urgently address the stark deficits addressed in The Living Music Report.

    Also in this issue, Limelight’s Editor-at-Large Clive Paget interviews Italian director Damiano Michieletto about his new production of Offenbach’s The Tales of Hoffmann, which has its world premiere at Opera Australia in August. He also interviews Spanish maestro Jaime Martín, the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra’s new Chief Conductor, and rounds up the best of this month’s new recordings.

    Alexander Voltz writes about his new opera Edward and Richard: The True Story of the Princes in the Tower, Lynden Barber reviews the likeable Australian film Buckley’s Chance, and Diana Simmonds reviews Richard Davies’ book A Star On Her Door: The Life and Career of June Bronhill.

    And there’s plenty more. In his latest Soapbox, Guy Noble owns up to a bad case of PCSD – Post-COVID Stress Disorder. Brian Nixon tells us about the Timpani in Playing Up, Jonathan Biggins says enough with the free theatre tickets in Sacred Cow, and Toby Chadd, the former ABC Classic and ABC Jazz Content Manager, who recently took up the role of Director of Artistic Programming at the Australian Chamber Orchestra, tell us about how his musicologist father inspired his own musical curiosity in My Music.

    The July 2021 issue of Limelight is available online from 28 June and in stores from 2 July

    The post Introducing the July 2021 issue of Limelight appeared first on Limelight.

  • The Woman in Black (Ensemble Theatre)
    17 June 2021

    The Woman in Black is billed as a spine-chiller that will have you watching through your fingers but if you seek a fright-fest, best to look elsewhere. Mark Kilmurry’s production of the West End favourite – it enjoys second position as London’s longest-running play, bested only by The Mousetrap – is frankly a washout in the terror stakes.

    There is, though, something rather good happening on the little Ensemble stage in Kirribilli, even if that little stage isn’t the right place for special effects that might make you leap out of your seat in fear. As well as being a ghost story, The Woman in Black is a love letter to the theatre and to the acting profession and it’s here that Kilmurry’s production shines.

    Garth Holcombe as The Actor in The Woman in Black. Photograph © Daniel Boud

    The Woman in Black started life as a gothic horror novel written in 1983 by Susan Hill. In 1987 Stephen Mallatratt, who was an actor as well as a writer, adapted it for performance at Alan Ayckbourn’s theatre in Scarborough in the north of England. Apparently it was staged in a space that also doubled as the theatre’s canteen and seated only about 100 people, but worked well enough that it transferred to the West End not much more than a year later and ran and ran. It has been staged in many languages and countries, likely not just because of the enduring appeal of thrillers, but also because it’s that wondrous beast, a popular two-hander.

    The book is narrated by Arthur Kipps, a man who years before had a spooky experience that greatly affected his life. He takes the reader back there one Christmas when, at a family gathering, he is being pestered to tell a ghost story. Everyone knows one, he is told. Well, yes indeed. Kipps knows one. He lived one and has been trying ever since to get the monkey off his back.

    Mallatratt’s adaptation unfolds as a piece of play-acting. Kipps hires a professional to guide him through a reading of his story, the better to come to terms with it and deliver it. It’s a clever conceit. There are plentiful references to Kipps’s need to engage with his audience and for the audience to engage with the drama. There is no word more repeated than “imagine!” and it brings to mind Shakespeare’s Prologue to Henry V: “can this cockpit hold/ The vasty field of France? Or may we cram/ Within this wooden O the very casques/ that did affright the air at Agincourt?”

    Obviously there will be no affrighting if the audience doesn’t put its mind to work and suspend disbelief, although a few loudly slammed doors and a scream or two don’t really cut the mustard at the Ensemble, where effects (by Bronte Bailey) are seen at too close range to be mystifying. Not to mention the fact that the eponymous woman in black … well, I’ll say no more, but there’s not much here to make the hairs stand up on the back of your neck. And truth to tell, this isn’t the most gripping horror yarn ever invented.

    Jamie Oxenbould as Mr Kipps in The Woman in Black. Photograph © Daniel Boud

    It’s enjoyable enough, but the real satisfaction in this production comes not from Hill’s rather ho-hum narrative but its metamorphosis into theatre. As the Actor (Garth Holcombe) and Kipps (Jamie Oxenbould) work on Kipps’s presentation, a transformation occurs. The Actor plays only Kipps while Kipps, at first seen only as a bumbling amateur, gradually takes on all other characters. The magic of the theatre! In the play’s early moments it is delightful to hear how flat and uninvolving Oxenbould sounds as Kipps starts to read and to contrast it with Holcombe’s version, so assured and polished. And yet the Actor is less true to the deep emotion Kipps obviously feels. It’s a performance. You hear the artifice. But as the Actor takes on Kipps’s persona he becomes more appealing, more vulnerable, more likeable. (And Holcombe gets the production’s funniest theatrical in-joke when he howls the name of Kipps’s fiancée. It’s Stella.) Meanwhile, Kipps turns into a veritable virtuoso with deft changes of coat, cap and accent.

    Oxenbould and Holcombe are lit brilliantly by Trudy Dalgleish in this good-looking show. Hugh O’Connor’s set of draped curtains, a door, a luggage trunk, some stools and a coat stand is just right and Michael Waters provides the sound design, with its truly excellent passing-train shriek. But the abiding pleasure is Oxenbould and Holcombe’s splendid double act. It’s a joy to see them at work.

    The Woman in Black plays at the Ensemble Theatre, Kirribilli, until July 24

    TICKETS

    The post The Woman in Black (Ensemble Theatre) appeared first on Limelight.

  • Feinstein's/54 Below Reopens Its Doors June 17 With Joe Iconis and George Salazar in Two Player Game
    17 June 2021
    The summer schedule also includes André De Shields, Shakina Nayfack, Beth Malone, Pride-themed shows, and a two-week run with Michael Feinstein.
  • Alan Cumming, Mj Rodriguez, Cynthia Nixon, More Star in Sperm Bank Heist Comedy From Audible, Out June 17
    17 June 2021
    Cumming directs and produces the series, featuring a predominantly LGBTQIA+ cast and creative team, as part of Audible’s partnership with Broadway Video.
  • Romeo and Juliet Begins June 17 at Regent's Park Open Air Theatre
    17 June 2021
    Isabel Adomakoh Young and Joel MacCormack play the star-crossed lovers.
  • Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline Star in Dear Elizabeth June 17
    17 June 2021
    The Spotlight on Plays virtual reading series concludes with this work by Sarah Ruhl.
  • Playbill's Glimmer of Light Takes the Stage at Radial Park June 17
    17 June 2021
    Jan Sport, Max Crumm, DeMarius R. Copes, and more are set for Playbill's first-ever live concert event.
  • In the News: Obi Abili, Kathleen Chalfant, Kelley Curran Star in Virtual Oresteia, Broadway Celebrates Juneteenth Details, More
    16 June 2021
    Plus: Anthony Roth Costanzo and Justin Vivian Bond team up for an act at St. Ann's Warehouse.
Author Information
admin
Author: admin
Latest buzzmyid.com Articles

Share
flipboard button
vk button