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20 June 2021

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  • Sha’Carri Richardson Wins 100-Meters to Make Her First Olympic Team
    20 June 2021

    The sprinter is considered Team USA’s biggest hope for a medal in Tokyo. She shared her biggest moment with her grandmother.

    The post Sha’Carri Richardson Wins 100-Meters to Make Her First Olympic Team appeared first on Women's Running.

  • Garmin Forerunner 55 Initial Review: Accurate, Legible, 33g Light, Full Garmin Eco System, $200
    20 June 2021

     Article by Sam Winebaum

    Garmin Forerunner 55 ($200)


    I am testing the just released Forerunner 55. At $200 it is very light on the wallet and on the wrist at 33g with only the Coros Pace 2 (RTR Review) a few grams lighter. 


    Fully capable as a training watch with most commonly used data fields available, it only leaves out some of the more sophisticated physiological evaluation metrics, navigation and usable altimeter, and some battery life but still has  a very respectable 20 hours training time and my initial run test indicates it definitely meets that spec.

    As far as smart watch features and health tracking, it includes all the Garmin standards such as heart rate stats, steps, calories, sleep quality, VO2 max and race time estimates, Body Battery (recovery), weather, notifications, calendar, music control, incident Detection and assistance (with phone in the mix) and recent run totals. All are accessible in summary and in detail from a handy single screen as widgets.


    Obviously Garmin is looking at the Coros Pace 2 as a key competitor. While the Pace 2 has longer battery life (30 hours training plus an ultra mode) and a barometric altimeter whose readings can be used in data screens,  I think, so far, it lags in smart watch features and overall ecosystem.. 


    Data collected and displayed in the Garmin Connect app during my first day is below:




    While its display dimensions are 1.04” vs the more common 1.2” and its resolution is 208 x 208 vs the usual 240 x 240, the screen is highly legible with Garmin’s nice fat fonts in the 3 data field view and superb trans reflectivity even at angles. 

    Why other brands don’t do this I don’t know… Looking at you Suunto 9 Peak with its thin fonts and dimmer trans reflectivity and where I had to squint on today’s run with it on my other wrist unless the sun hit the screen right and I know from testing that in dim light the backlight is weak.

    Graphs: DC Analyser

    My first run demonstrated accurate wrist HR on my dominant wrist. I had the Suunto 9 Peak (Initial Review) on my non-dominant wrist (blue above) and it struggled to find an accurate heart rate at the start of the run and after my many stops for pictures and to chat with friends I met on the trails in Round Valley, Park City. The lighter and smaller the watch I find the more accurate optical heart rate is especially on my dominant wrist. The 55 weighs a significant 20g less than the Suunto 9.

    GPS accuracy appears excellent. In the screenshot above you can see how closely both track to the actual trail. And the beautiful titanium bezel Peak is a $699 watch..not $200 as here.

    While there is no barometric altimeter called out in the Garmin specs and no data fields available for Ascent, Descent, Altitude and such, export of the data file shows an elevation profile remarkably close (purple above) to the Suunto 9 Peak (blue above)  who's on board altimeter is renowned during my test run. Is there one actually on board but “disabled” from view or am I looking at GPS data correlated from the track I am not sure. 


    More testing to come, but if you are training with a Forerunner 10, 15, 35, 45, 225, or 235 or any 3 to 4 year old watch (as all brands have improved accuracy and battery life in recent years), the Forerunner 55 is clearly a great new option. Need those extras of altimeter data view, deeper performance stats, 4 more hours of battery life, and breadcrumb navigation look at the 245 at $150 more. 


    If you have a “heavy '' watch that weighs you down and you struggle with wrist heart rate with it and just need the more essential and training basics, data field configurability, and full smartwatch capabilities the 55 is also a great new choice.


    Garmin's compare tool where I compare the F45, F245, and F55 is here


    The Forerunner 55 is available now including at our partners below

    Tested samples were provided at no charge for review purposes. No other compensation was received by RTR or the authors for this review beyond potential commissions from the shopping links in the article. The opinions herein are entirely the authors'.

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  • Colleen Quigley Withdraws From the Olympic Trials With Injury
    19 June 2021

    The 2016 Olympian has been part of a trio of women who have dominated the steeplechase for five years.

    The post Colleen Quigley Withdraws From the Olympic Trials With Injury appeared first on Women's Running.

  • Top U.S. Distance Runners Share Their Best Piece of Running Advice
    19 June 2021

    The nation’s top female distance runners tell us all the training tips, pieces of advice, and bits of pure wisdom that have helped them improve along the way.

    The post Top U.S. Distance Runners Share Their Best Piece of Running Advice appeared first on Women's Running.

  • Silentish Saturday!!
    19 June 2021

    I got to run with MADDIE again!  She was cleared to start running again after having her baby and I am very grateful for this reunion.

    9.42 miles @ 9:09 average with a gas station stop for more ice water because it was so hot and humid!

    I finished my run at the mall to meet up with my dad to walk together.  It was the absolute best. 

    He drove me home in his Porsche and I love the legroom in his car.

    Pancakes when I got home.

    Hanging out in a parking lot and Brooke insisted on having Beck play with her.

    Friends invited us to the lake!

    And then we finished off the night at a reception for a close friend.

    The pizza was so ridiculously good and so was the ice cream.

    ——————————————————————————————————————

    Tell me 3 things you have going on today!

  • Should You Go Running With Ankle Weights?
    19 June 2021

    There are a variety of ways to increase the intensity of your run.

    You could run on an incline or decline, increase your pace, or choose the trail instead of the road. One of the ways to place more of a load on your legs while running is to run with ankle weights.

    But should you go running with ankle weights or can it do more harm than good? There are a number of factors to consider before strapping on some ankle weights as you go for your daily run.

    Let’s take a look at what they are, how they can be used to strengthen your legs and improve your running – and whether or not they’re the best choice for you.

    What Are Ankle Weights?

    Ankle weights—also known as leg weights—are wearable weights that wrap around your ankles with velcro straps.

    The weights are available in a range of weight levels, from 1 to 5 pounds. There are also adjustable weights that allow you to add or remove weights.

    Ankle weights are commonly used in strength training to add weight to exercises such as leg raises, ballerinas, and bicycles.

    But they’re also sometimes used to add resistance during a walk or run to improve one’s endurance, build muscle, strengthen joints, burn calories and increase one’s speed.

    When Running or Walking, Should I Use Ankle Weights?

    Running with ankle weights isn’t recommended. Walking with ankle weights is a better option if the walk is at a slow pace.

    While using ankle weights when running does provide more resistance, it also puts you at a high risk of injuring yourself. You may even develop muscle imbalances due to an uneven dispersion of weight.

    Your running form changes, as your body needs to compensate for the extra weight and still be able to pick your feet up fast as you run.

    Disadvantages of Ankle Weights

    Having heavy weight on your ankles while you’re running—especially if your legs are not extremely strong—can throw your running form off as your knee drive decreases and instead you develop a “leg drag”.

    This in itself is not optimal running form. But it also means that if you use ankle weights often, you could adapt to this new gait. You will probably find it hard to regain your correct form when you run without the ankle weights.

    You’ll also be at more risk of tripping or losing your balance with ankle weights on. It’s difficult to stop suddenly, as the upper body may continue moving as the legs stop, causing you to fall. Your control over your own legs will be less. If you already have weak ankles, the chance of twisting an ankle is much higher.

    Losing your balance or running with improper form not only leads to a greater load on your joints in the legs but can also lead to injuries along the muscle chain, including the hips, lower back, and upper back injuries.

    Ankle weights also put extra stress on the IT band and the hip flexors as one’s gait changes. Your joints take more of a beating, as you’re landing harder with each step due to the extra weight. This can lead to debilitating pain and injuries that could have you hanging up your running shoes for 6 to 8 weeks or longer.

    It’s also not the most effective way to build up strength and muscle in your legs. The chance of injury is higher than the potential for building muscle. You should consider a form of cross-training that targets the legs, such as rowing, weight training, or working out on the elliptical.

    Alternatives to Ankle Weights

    If you are determined to add resistance training to your running, a weighted vest would be a safer option.

    Not only does it have the potential to add more weight than ankle weights, but the weight is more evenly distributed and the core takes most of the load, not the legs.

    You would still need to take care to maintain proper posture and form when running with a weighted vest.

    If You Do Try Running with Ankle Weights

    If you don’t have access to a weighted vest or other forms of cross-training and you can only run with ankle weights, then make sure to do it safely and carefully if you want to benefit from it.

    Start slowly working them into your running routine. You will need to build up strength slowly so that you don’t injure yourself. To start, use ankle weights on one short run per week, and as you get used to it, increase either the amount of time or the distance you’re running with them.

    That being said, you should also only use ankle weights for short distances. Running for long distances with ankle weights increases your potential for injury as it puts far too much load on the joints and ligaments.

    How to Use Ankle Weights

    Ankle weights are easy to use. Just wrap the weight part around the ankle and hook it with the velcro strap. Adjust the strap to fit your ankle.

    The weight should sit just above the ankle joint so that it gets stopped from falling down while you’re wearing it. It should be snug but not restricting.

    Potential Benefits of Ankle Weights

    If used carefully and properly, one can derive some benefits from wearing ankle weights. These benefits will be the same whether walking or running, although there is an increased chance of injury when running.

    Using ankle weights safely can develop one’s endurance, as the body has to work harder to do the same kind of exercise it normally would.

    By building strength—even slowly—you’ll find that after a period of time, you can run faster and further than you used to, with the same amount of effort.

    While you won’t build a lot of strength in comparison to doing cross-training, you can tone your legs by wearing ankle weights.

    You can also burn more calories since you have to work harder to do the exercise. You can add progressive overload with ankle weights, by increasing the weight gradually.

    Although we don’t advise it unless you’re an elite athlete or a very accomplished swimmer, some people use ankle weights while swimming. These weights should be the lightest ones possible to avoid sinking and can actually help to build ankle strength without impact on the joints.

    When to Avoid Wearing Ankle Weights

    Individuals with weak ankles, tight calves, or weak hip flexors should avoid using ankle weights as incorrect use of the weights can aggravate these conditions and increase the chance of injury.

    If you have joint pain already—even if it’s not in the legs—then using ankle weights is not recommended. Also, individuals who are overweight or underweight should avoid ankle weights until their fitness levels have improved.

    Exercises to Try with Ankle Weights

    If you have a set of ankle weights and you’re disappointed to hear that you shouldn’t run with them, there are still plenty of exercises you can do to strengthen your legs with them.

    Here are a few you should learn:

    Step Ups

    Attach the ankle weights to your ankles. You should be facing an elevated surface—a high step, box or seat—with your feet hip-width apart. Place one foot onto the elevated surface and step up. Concentrate on lifting yourself off the floor by contracting your glutes and quads.

    Place your two feet together on the box. Then, step back down again, taking care to keep your posture right. Repeat this as many times as you can, taking care to focus on the muscles and your posture every single time.

    Knee Ups

    This is similar to step-ups. Place the weights on your ankles and stand in front of whatever it is that you’re stepping onto.

    Step up with one foot. As you bring your other foot up, instead of placing it on the box next to your first foot, lift your knee up close to your chest. This should be a dynamic movement, pushing up through the heel of the foot that’s on the step.

    Step straight back down, so that your other foot doesn’t touch the step at all. Then, repeat the movement for 5 to 10 reps. Change feet and repeat the entire exercise.

    Squat with Leg Lift

    Attach the ankle weights to your ankles. Stand on a flat surface with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width. Drop into a squat—sit back as though you’re sitting down—keeping your knees in line with your feet until your thighs are parallel to the floor.

    Then, drive up through your heels—pulling your glutes forward—until you’re standing upright again. As you come up, lift one leg and extend it out to the side, like a kick. Bring it down again and go into your next rep.

    Try this for 5 sets of 10 reps each—5 reps on each leg.

    Supermans

    With the ankle weights attached to your lower legs, lie flat on your stomach, with your arms extended out in front of you.

    Lift your arms and feet off of the floor and hold them in the air for as long as you can. Your chest should lift slightly off the floor, as should your quads.

    You will look like Superman flying! You should aim to hold this position for 15 seconds. Then, return your limbs to the ground, rest for a second or two, and do your next rep. One set counts as 15 seconds in the air, and you can do 5 sets.

    As always, make sure to keep your back straight and don’t stiffen your neck when doing this exercise as it could cause injury.

    The post Should You Go Running With Ankle Weights? appeared first on The Wired Runner.

  • Best Nikes For Standing All Day in 2021
    19 June 2021
     

    Individuals who spend a lot of time on their feet during the day are at risk of leg and foot pain, back problems. Plus you just need a pair of comfortable shoes!

    Wearing the right pair of shoes can reduce these risks significantly and keep your feet from aching at the end of the day.

    Nike shoes offer ideal support and cushioning. Our top pick is the Nike Renew Ride 2. This supportive shoe and super comfortable, breathable, with some nice padding in the upper.

    Whether or not you’re already a fan of the Nike brand, these are the best Nikes for standing all day and you should consider choosing one of these pairs.

    Top 3 Best and Favorite
    Best Overall

    Best Overall

     

    Nike Renew Ride 2

     

    • Dual-density midsole
    • Low-profile design
    • Padded tongue and cuff
    CHECK MEN’S PRICECHECK WOMEN’S PRICE
    Top Slip-On

    Top Slip-On

     

    Nike Air Zoom Pulse

     

    • Easy on and off
    • Zoom Air unit in the heel
    • Polyurethane-coated upper
    CHECK PRICE
    Best Value

    Best Value

     

    Nike Revolution 5 Flyease

     

    • Lace-free FlyEase closure
    • Reinforced heel
    • Soft midsole cushioning
    CHECK MEN’S PRICECHECK WOMEN’S PRICE
    Best Overall
    1. Nike Renew Ride 2

    The wide base and solid cushioning of the Nike Renew Ride make it our top choice.

    It’s cushioned in all the right places, above and below. The upper is a dual-layer mesh that allows good airflow and has water-resistant properties.

    But the heel and ankle collars and tongue are well padded for extra comfort. It may take some getting used to, but it effectively cushions the foot from all angles. It’s also gender-specific, with the women’s shoe being shaped slightly differently around the collar to cater to a woman’s foot.

    Nike’s foam midsole is thicker than the previous Ride’s, which means you can be on your feet for longer and not feel negative effects.

    But it remains a good mix of plush comfort and firm support, and it’s a firmer foam than many others. Some might find this to be uncomfortable, but it provides good support for long days on your feet.

    Nike shoes are naturally narrow, so those with wide feet may need to order a size up.

    Also, these shoes seem to run snug in the toe box, so if you like ample space for your toes, it may be advisable to order a large size.

    PROS:

    • Dual-density midsole
    • Low-profile design
    • Padded tongue and cuff
    • Stiff heel clip

    CONS:

    • This shoe can run narrow in the toe box and you may have to order a half size up
     
    Top Slip On
    2. Nike Air Zoom Pulse

    These Nikes are not only super comfy slip-on shoes, but they’ve been created specifically for nurses. They have also been tested by nurses and passed with flying colors.

    This shoe has no laces. Instead, it relies on a flexible heel that creates an opening wide enough for your foot to slip in. A pull tab on the heel and another on the bridge of the foot make it easy to get this shoe on and off without a problem.

    The foam is soft and spongy, providing comfort for long hours of standing or walking. It also features a Zoom Air unit underneath the heel, which effectively absorbs shock and reduces foot fatigue.

    The upper is water-resistant—polyurethane-coated—synthetic material, easy to clean, and great for protecting your feet from spills and splashes. The outsole is durable rubber, providing safety on all surfaces, wet or dry.

    PROS:

    • Easy on and off
    • Zoom Air unit in the heel
    • Water-dispersive traction pattern
    • Polyurethane-coated upper

    CONS:

    • There’s no way to custom adjust this shoe to fit your foot
     
    Best Value
    3. Nike Revolution 5 Flyease

    The Revolution 5 FlyEase is an affordable, comfortable, and cushioned shoe.

    In the midsole, a lightweight foam offers adequate soft cushioning and also features a textured outer wall, which helps to reduce the weight of the shoe even more.

    The most noticeable feature of this shoe is the no-lace Flyease lacing system. A unique round-the-heel zipper with an over-bridge zipper creates a wide foot opening, making these shoes very easy to get on and off.

    The upper is breathable and keeps the air flowing to prevent stuffy shoes and smelly feet when you finally get to take your shoes off. There are synthetic overlays on the heel and midfoot, providing extra structure to support your foot throughout the day.

    A full-length rubber outsole is highly durable, and also features flex grooves for a more flexible experience. This prevents your foot muscles from getting tired by reducing how much they have to work.

    Those with small or narrow feet may find that they can’t get a tight enough fit with the FlyEase system.

    PROS:

    • Lace-free FlyEase closure
    • Reinforced heel
    • Padded tongue and collar
    • Soft midsole cushioning

    CONS:

    • There may be heel movement as you can’t lock the foot down as tight with the FlyEase system
     
    Top For Concrete
    4. Nike React Miler 2

    The cushion and durability on the outsole of this shoe make it a good choice for people who spend all day on their feet on concrete surfaces.

    High-abrasion rubber on the sole not only provides good traction but also takes longer to wear away.

    A full-length slab of React foam in the midsole offers exceptional plush cushioning, particularly effective on hard surfaces. There’s no Air Zoom unit in this shoe, but the React cushions well although it’s not as responsive.

    For extra stability, the heel is slightly flared to make a slightly wider and more stable platform. There’s also a heel stabilizing clip, providing a locked-down feel. Another helpful feature that will stabilize the foot when you’re standing on hard surfaces.

    In the midfoot, a band (made up of four sections) tightens around your foot when you tighten the laces.

    PROS:

    • Rigid heel counter
    • React technology foam
    • Rocker shaped sole
    • Strategically placed high-abrasion rubber

    CONS:

    • May not be suitable for wide feet
     
    Best For Women
    5. Nike Free TR8

    This Nike shoe is designed as a cross-trainer for women. It’s considered to be a lightweight shoe, but it still has sufficient padding for those ladies who are going to be on their feet all day.

    It has a slip-on design that makes it easy and comfortable to get on and off. There are large pull tabs on the tongue and the ankle collar, so one can get their foot in and out easily. The lacing system is reinforced with Flywire cables in the upper to provide more rigidity without being uncomfortable or inflexible.

    A light mesh upper allows the feet to stay well-ventilated throughout the day. You’ll find an inner sleeve that creates a sock-like fit, with a lightly padded ankle collar for a chafe-free experience. A synthetic external heel counter helps to support the heel as you go about your daily tasks.

    A soft foam midsole offers shock attenuation and comfort. There’s a raised section in the side of the midfoot, which provides extra support and prevention against lateral movement.

    A wide base means the shoes are stable on the floor. It was designed for exercises like squats, but it means that you’ll be extra stable on your feet. The full-length rubber outsole is designed for durability, specifically for high-intensity activities. If you walk around a lot during the day, these shoes should still feel comfortable.

    There are also hexagonal flex grooves in the outsole which allow the foot to flex naturally and prevent pain and discomfort from being confined in a shoe for long periods of time.

    Although Nike shoes usually run on the narrower side, this shoe seems to run a little wider than average. Individuals with narrow feet may need to order a small side to fit comfortably.

    PROS:

    • EVA midsole cushioning
    • Integrated Flywire cables
    • Full-length rubber foam outsole
    • Hexagonal flex grooves

    CONS:

    • They may be a bit wide for people with narrow feet
     
    Top For Wide Feet
    6. Nike Air Zoom Pegasus 38

    The Pegasus 38 is one of Nike’s most anticipated and most well-received shoes. It’s a good choice for those with wide feet, as comes in wide widths.

    The mesh upper is tight-knit and durable, but also offers good airflow through to the feet. It’s supportive but slightly stretchy, so your foot can flex comfortably and naturally.

    A midfoot webbing works together with the laces to form a snug wrap around the midfoot when you lace your shoes, giving you more support.

    The previous iteration of the Pegasus had an unstable heel that was very difficult to lock down. Nike has fixed that in the 38, by adding a thick, plush tongue. It not only increases comfort on the bridge of the foot but also pushes the foot further back. This allows for a stable and locked-in heel, which is ideal if you spend a lot of time walking.

    A generous slab of React foam in the midsole cushions the foot very well, keeping you very comfortable without feeling too soft or too firm.

    There’s also a Zoom Air unit in the forefoot, which not only cushions but also helps put a spring in your step and reduce fatigue.

    Many users have said that the pegasus 38 runs small so you may need to order a size larger.

    PROS:

    • Spacious toe box
    • Zoom Air unit in forefoot
    • React foam midsole
    • Midfoot webbing

    CONS:

    • The shoe may run small so you would need to order one size up
     
    Most Durable
    7. Nike Winflo 8

    If you’re hard on your shoes, the Winflo 8 could be the best choice for you.

    It’s very durable, with a full sole, full-contact rubber design that forms a thick layer on the bottom of the shoe. There’s a separate heel crash pad and a deep groove—transition channel—down the middle which helps you to keep a natural gait even if you’re just walking.

    A tightly knit mesh upper allows for breathability and uses Flywire cables to secure the foot in a locked-down fit once laced. A padded tongue helps to prevent chafing on the top of the foot once it’s been laced down.

    Two Zoom Air units in the midsole do a good job of reducing shock no matter what kind of surface you’re walking or standing on. The midsole is made from Cushlon foam, which is soft and delightful underfoot.

    PROS:

    • Transition channel
    • Heel crash pad
    • Cushlon midsole foam
    • Zoom air units in the forefoot and heel

    CONS:

    • Some buyers suggest that this shoe runs slightly small
     
    Most Comfortable
    8. Nike Zoom Span 3

    The Zoom Span is an affordable and comfortable pair of classic Nikes that has a generous stack height for better shock absorption and plush cushioning.

    Zoom Air units in the forefoot of the midsole make it more cushioned, responsive, and comfortable.

    There are pistons strategically placed in the forefoot for a better walking experience. Underneath the foot, a “ride rail” splits the waffle outsole to increase flexibility.

    The outsole is made from durable rubber. This not only extends the life of the shoe but absorbs shock and increases comfort.

    The upper includes perforations for better airflow. The lacing system features Flywire cables so you can get a better custom fit without creating pressure points.

    Some people suggest that these shoes run small, so you may need to order a half size up.

    PROS:

    • Air Zoom unit in the forefoot
    • Forefoot pistons
    • Rubber waffle outsole
    • Midfoot Flywire cables

    CONS:

    • Some people suggest that these shoes run small
     

    FAQs What should you look for in everyday shoes when you are on your feet all day?

    When you’re looking for a pair of everyday shoes to protect your feet from the strain of standing all day, there are a number of things you should consider.

    The cushioning is one of the most important aspects of a shoe when you’ll be wearing it for many hours. It should be comfortable and plush enough to not flatten after you’ve been standing on it for a few hours.

    The shoe should not be too flexible as that could lead to fatigue in the muscles of the foot during the day. It should also not be a lightweight shoe, as less weight usually means less cushion. You may need to sacrifice lightness for comfort.

    Whichever shoes you choose should also be durable, breathable to allow for airflow throughout the shoe especially when you’ll be wearing them for hours, and any support features you may need—such as a stability shoe for overpronators.

    The post Best Nikes For Standing All Day in 2021 appeared first on The Wired Runner.

  • Visiting the Pacific Coast Air Museum (PCAM)
    19 June 2021

    Before leaving Northern California, I wanted to get to the Pacific Coast Air Museum (PCAM). Just like running, I enjoy airplanes and their history. The pandemic and moving have taken a toll on our general aviation flights, but it’s always fun to visit museums. Hopefully, we will be able to get back into general aviation again.

    About: History of the Pacific Coast Air Museum (PCAM):

    The Pacific Coast Air Museum (PCAM) began in 1990 in the control tower at the Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County Airport (the current airport it’s at now).

    They created an open house on May 26, 1990, to educate the public about private aircraft. For many, it was their first time seeing a small aircraft up close!  The open house was so well received they made it an annual event. Now, the Wings over Wine Airshow attracts over 20,000 people! I wish we could have gone.

    In the beginning, Pacific Coast Air Museum was just an open house of privately owned airplanes. Later, the PCAM obtained a battered A-26 Invader attack bomber from the World War II era. It was missing several pieces, but it underwent a full restoration.

    After that, PCAM began taking in airplanes to show off. Most of the needed restoration was done by Pacific Coast Air Museum volunteers. In 1993, they acquired an F-8U which quickly became one of their most popular exhibits, and put them on the “Bay Area Map.” Now the museum attracts people from all over, whether you are traveling or popping up from the Bay Area.

    Since then, the PCAM has acquired many different airplanes, including the F-4C and the F-16N Viper (also known from Topgun).

    Their aircraft is primarily military from the Korean War and Vietnam War eras to the modern planes. Some like the T-38 are still flown today. All planes are authentic, and many still have the original engines and nearly complete cockpit. At the museum, they strive to restore and maintain historic aircraft to represent them as authentically as possible.

    Not all planes at Pacific Coast Air Museum are military, and they have a Pitts Special Stunt Biplane and S-2A aerial fire fighting tanker. They said some of their airplanes are still used to fight fires now. In addition to airplanes, the Pacific Coast Air Museum also has aviation-related displays, display engines, and all sorts of aviation-related things.

    A plane engineVisiting Pacific Coast Air Museum (PCAM):

    The museum is located at the Charles M Schulz – Sonoma County Airport. It’s easy to find off Airport Blvd. on the corner of N. Laughlin Rd. and Becker Blvd.

    They open Wednesday-Sunday from 10-4 pm. For adults, it is $10, and for children $5. Active duty military get in free! Parking is easy, and there is plenty of space.

    My Experience at Pacific Coast Air Museum (PCAM):

    When we went, there were only about 5 parties there. Minus the flight simulator and gift shop, the entire Pacific Coast Air Museum is outdoors, which is nice, especially in “COVID-related times.” We walked around the entire area, and during our time, we saw plenty of larger aircraft taking off from the Charles M Schulz – Sonoma County Airport too.

    A “homebuild” airplane

    I didn’t even know Alaska Airlines flew into Charles M Schulz – Sonoma County Airport.

    We got to sit in the cockpit of several airplanes that were open, and the volunteers shared all sorts of stories with us. It was fun to interact and chat with the volunteers as well.

    We decided not to do the flight simulator (I am fairly certain my spouse has had enough “flight simulators” for one year.

    There was also a band playing in the hanger. If you are in the Santa Rosa or North Bay area, I highly suggest checking out the Pacific Coast Air Museum (PCAM), especially if you are a plane lover. It took just over an hour to walk around and see all of the exhibits, and we are glad we did.

    You can see more general aviation posts here and plan your visit here.

    Questions for you:

    Have you ever been to an airshow or airplane museum?

    What is your favorite airplane? 

     

    The post Visiting the Pacific Coast Air Museum (PCAM) appeared first on FueledByLOLZ.

  • Spice Up Your Dinner Plans With These Chile and Lime Bay Scallops
    19 June 2021

    This is a super flavorful side or entrée, perfect for weekday or weekend meals.

    The post Spice Up Your Dinner Plans With These Chile and Lime Bay Scallops appeared first on Women's Running.

  • Day One of the 2021 Olympic Trials: Abbey Cooper’s Triumphant Return
    19 June 2021

    In the semi-final round of the 5,000 meters on the first day of the Olympic Trials, it was Abbey Cooper who inspired again.

    The post Day One of the 2021 Olympic Trials: Abbey Cooper’s Triumphant Return appeared first on Women's Running.

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U.K. Runners blogs

UK Running Blogs

20 June 2021

UK Running Blogs UK Running Blogs
  • Race To The King 2021
    19 June 2021

    On 19th June 2021 I took part in Race To The King, a 53 mile (Double Marathon) race. This is the 6th Ultra Marathon I have taken part in and the 3rd with Threshold Events. This means I now have the hat trick (having completed their 3 original events). I took part in Race To The Stones 2017, see my review HERE. I also took part in Race To The Tower in 2019, see my review HERE. Today marks my 85th qualifying event towards the 100 Marathon Club. Meaning I’ve ran 85 events which include a marathon or more as part of the event. I am getting so close to the 100 now.

    Race to the King #flatlay

    I organised my kit before leaving, making sure I had everything. For an ultra it is even more important to be prepared. I am mindful lots of people reading this will be planning their first Ultra, so I wrote a blog about my packing for an Ultra, which you can see HERE.

    Family time and the biggest burger

    With an event like this, it starts the night before. With most events people talk about the importance of carb loading and hydration. I find with Ultras it doesn’t make the hugest difference.  I’m not trying to shave off seconds, I’m there to enjoy it and finish. So the night before was about family time, so we arrived at our Haven Caravan, and then made our way to a pub. I may have had too many beers, but that’s good care loading right? Also my waiter was shocked at how fast I ate my burger. He said he has never seen anyone ask to double it up before, and usually the staff struggle to eat half of one.

    Ready to run

    It was a very early start, 06:30 for me, but to be honest I prefer to get off early. It felt great to be at a large event, and I’m impressed by all the covid safety measures put in place by Threshold Events. We lined up like in airport security, and I joined towards the back of my wave, which meant I started after about 10 minutes. A great way to space people out at the start. Only issue is I should have lined up earlier, as I found myself restricted for the first 3 miles. It really wasn’t the end of the world though, and after about 3 miles we had our own space to run at our own pace.

    Start line at RTTK

    It was such a beautiful route. There were lots of hills, but not as bad as Tower. We also had some nice conditions. I’m glad the rain stayed away, and the cloud coverage and mist made it more mild, perfect for running.

    Pit Stop tables

    There were 7 pit stops altogether including Basecamp. I think it was the first that had a selection of sandwiches, I enjoyed a cheese and tomato one. At Basecamp I had tomato soup and a large bread roll.  At all the other stations there were bars, sweets, crisps, fruit, tea, coffee, coke and water with electrolytes. I made a point of stopping and filling up my water every pit stop to make sure I was drinking enough, one flask with water and the other with electrolytes. I had a coke at every stop for a boost and also ate my fair share of sweets and crisps on the go. All the staff and volunteers were so helpful and friendly.  With support like this, you could easily turn up with an empty bag and hydration vest and be able to get everything you need.

    Basecamp

    The reason I love these events is that it’s all about the running. You don’t have to worry about all your nutritional needs, you don’t have to worry about navigation because it’s so well marked, if you want to you can break the event into two days and camp. Everything is covered, you just need to turn up and run.

    Enjoying the trails

    That’s what I did, I turned up and ran. I had a loose target of 10 hours in mind. I based this on absolutely nothing. I have only done the Double Marathon twice now, my other 4 ultra have been 100k. The first time was at Tower in 2019 and I struggled. I wasn’t in great shape but I knew I could do 100k so thought it would be OK. I underestimated the distance, I underestimated the impact of the hills. I struggled so much but still finished in 11:57. A time that I knew I should have done quicker than. So today I set off with 10 hours in mind. At half way I was on for just over 9 hours, but then the hills started to impact, especially Butser Hill at mile 31, that was the biggest. After I slowed it was hard to pick up the pace again, but I carried on going.

    Beautiful views

    I actually ran an extra mile in the pit stops. I also probably wasted over 45 minutes in the pit stops altogether, but frankly it was nice to take on nutrition and talk to people. I spoke to so many people and really appreciate all the support. I also walked slowly up a lot of hills. So honestly, I am so happy with 10:23:19.

    Finish medal

    I got to see my family at around 30 miles, and then at the finish.

    Family fun

    I was able to pick up the pace for the final mile when I hit the town (I’m faster on flat road). It was such a beautiful finish.

    Finish vibes

    So that is Race To The King complete. My 3rd of the Threshold series. I had wanted to do Race To The Castle this year, but just couldn’t justify the long travel, and my family just were not up for it. I am however doing Race To The Stones. I haven’t worked out logistics yet, but I will be there.

    Finish

    I have raised over £5,000 for Cancer Research by running 11 marathons in 11 days. With a Double Marathon added to my Journey it would be great to raise a little more.

  • The Tour de France launches the ‘Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift’
    19 June 2021

    Sunday the 24th of July 2022, Amaury Sport Organisation will launch a new women’s race that will carry the signature of the World’s biggest race, the Tour de France. It will adopt the same codes, values and symbols as the men’s race. After having enriched its calendar with prestigious women’s events over the last few years, A.S.O. will accentuate its development in women’s cycling. With the UCI Women’s World Tour label, the race will feature 8 days of racing. The first stage will finish in Paris on the Champs-Elysées, on the day of the final stage of the Tour de France 2022. Straight after the Tour de France, during the summer holidays, the timing will provide the public the best opportunity to easily be able to come and support the riders from the side of the road.

    The global online fitness platform Zwift will be the presenting partner of the event whose official name will be “Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift”. Equally determined to support the growth of women’s cycling, A.S.O. and Zwift have signed a partnership agreement for the next 4 years. The long term partnership aims to promote and develop the discipline through this new race by making it the biggest event in the women’s calendar from its creation.

    With more than a year to go before the race starts, A.S.O. are able to announce that the partnership ecosystem of the Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift is already very well developed.

    Many of the Tour de France’s partners couldn’t wait to show their enthusiasm and commit from the first edition of the Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift. LCL will be supporting the famous leader’s Yellow Jersey, E.Leclerc will support the polka dot jersey of the mountain classification. Liv Cycling, the company dedicated to getting more women on bikes, and already well known in cycling, will make its debut as a major partner by supporting the best young rider classification. A partner of La Course by Le Tour de France avec FDJ from the beginning, and future supporter of Paris-Roubaix Femmes, FDJ will join the event’s major partners. As for the Tour de France, Tissot will be the timekeeper of the race. Other partners will be joining them in the next few weeks.

    In terms of media exposure, the Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift will benefit from daily live television coverage with a broad exposure all over the world.

    France Télévisions will extend its ‘afternoon of cycling’ coverage of the Tour de France by one week to allow viewers the chance to support their champions. In addition, an agreement with the EBU (European Broadcasting Union) will mean that the event will be broadcast on large public channels in the biggest European markets.

    An ambitious and complete communication plan will accompany the new race’s official launch presentation in October right up until it starts on the 24th July 2022.

    All of the details regarding the Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift including its route and its rules will be revealed on Thursday 14th October 2021 during the presentation of the Tour de France 2022 at the Palais des Congrès de Paris.

    “This is an incredibly important announcement for us as we look to build on our investment in women’s cycling and really help grow and develop the sport,” says Eric Min, CEO & Co-Founder of Zwift. “Building on the success of the Virtual Tour de France on Zwift last year, this has been many months in the making and both Zwift and the A.S.O are delighted to make the dream a reality. I’ve long been a fan of the attacking style of women’s racing. I really believe the women’s peloton puts on some of the most exciting bike racing to watch and it deserves a much bigger platform to exhibit these talents and skills. I’m proud that we can play a big part in making the Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift a reality in 2022. Together we can bring women’s cycling to a larger audience and inspire new generations of female cyclists for years to come.”

    Christian Prudhomme, Director of the Tour de France said, “Building an event like the Tour de France Femmes avec Zwift means offering women’s cycling an event that is ready to highlight the sporting qualities of some exceptional riders. The birth of this race represents the prospect of seeing a women’s race rise to the top of world sport. The riders and champions will no doubt be eager to take on some tough routes and go after the most prestigious of prizes, the Yellow Jersey.”

    More information on www.letourfemmes.com

  • Abbott extends partnership with London Marathon until 2024
    19 June 2021

    Abbott, the global healthcare company, has extended its partnership with the London Marathon for another three years, from 2022 until 2024.

    Abbott, a leader in Covid-19 testing technologies, has been an official sponsor of the London Marathon since 2015 and was instrumental in helping LME stage the elite races at the 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon on a bio-secure closed-loop circuit around St James’s Park.

    LME is continuing to work with Abbott to support the safe and successful delivery of the 2021 Virgin Money London Marathon. The event takes place on Sunday 3 October, when 50,000 people are expected to take on the traditional route from Blackheath to the Mall, while 50,000 take part virtually from wherever they are in the world, creating a historic total of 100,000 participants and the biggest marathon ever staged. It promises to be a spectacular and memorable 2021 Virgin Money London Marathon.

    Chris Miller, Divisional Vice President, Global Brand Strategy and Innovation, Abbott said: “It has never been more important to prioritise health. Abbott helps people live fuller lives through our life-changing technologies, and through our continued partnership with the Virgin Money London Marathon, we celebrate the dedication and achievement of the participants who inspire so many to be healthier.”

    Hugh Brasher, Event Director, London Marathon Events said: “We are delighted to renew our partnership with Abbott for a further three years. Our partnership has really come into its own in the past year and Abbott’s diagnostics expertise and support in Covid-19 testing was absolutely key to the successful delivery of the elite races at the 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon.

    “The renewal of this partnership shows the strength of the London Marathon at such a challenging time in the mass participation sports industry. We are looking forward to working together for the next three years.”

    Abbott is also the title partner of the Abbott World Marathon Majors (AbbottWMM), a series of six of the largest and most-renowned marathons in the world – Tokyo Marathon, B.A.A. Boston Marathon, Virgin Money London Marathon, BMW BERLIN-MARATHON, Bank of America Chicago Marathon and TCS New York City Marathon.

    The 2021 Virgin Money London Marathon will also host the inaugural AbbottWMM Wanda Age Group World Championship, the first-ever global age group marathon ranking system.

  • IRONMAN and Breitling launch the Endurance Pro IRONMAN watches
    19 June 2021

    Breitling and IRONMAN have signed a long-term partnership and teamed up to co-design the Endurance Pro IRONMAN watches, a special series of Breitling’s ultimate athleisure watch. The result is a set of perfectly lightweight and light-hearted luxury sports watches combining high precision, innovative technology, and vibrant, colourful design. The launch features two exciting new watches: a red version available globally at all Breitling boutiques and retailers and at www.breitling.com for sports and timekeeping enthusiasts, and a black and gold piece exclusively available for IRONMAN® race finishers. Additional models reserved for the IRONMAN community are planned for the coming months.

    In 2019, Breitling and IRONMAN had already launched the highly successful Breitling Superocean IRONMAN Limited Edition. This new partnership kicks off a long-term collaboration with Breitling becoming the new Official Luxury Watch of IRONMAN.

    To celebrate the partnership and offer a first look at the watches, a special event was held at the Breitling Boutique in Beverly Hills last night, co-hosted by Breitling USA President Thierry Prissert and President and CEO of The IRONMAN Group Andrew Messick. In attendance as special guests were IRONMAN Hall of Famer and 1997 IRONMAN World Champion, Heather Fuhr; IRONMAN Ambassador and the first person with Down Syndrome to finish an IRONMAN, Chris Nikic; IRONMAN Hall of Famer and the Voice of IRONMAN, Mike Reilly; and professional IRONMAN triathlete Ben Hoffman, who was also on hand to celebrate the new watches, as well as his recent partnership with Breitling as a local ambassador in the US. Since turning professional in 2007, Hoffman has won numerous IRONMAN, IRONMAN 70.3 and National Championship victories.

    “IRONMAN truly reflects our core values of performance and endurance. We’ve designed this to be an ideal watch for elite athletes as well as a casual, everyday sports chronograph for active people who want that winning combination of performance and luxury,” said Breitling CEO Georges Kern.

    This eye-catching watch perfectly captures the energetic and versatile spirit of the iconic IRONMAN Triathlon Series, finds Kern along with Andrew Messick, President and CEO of The IRONMAN Group.

    “We’re thrilled to continue our partnership with such an exceptional and well-respected watchmaker. After the success of our collaboration in 2019, we are pleased to partner with Breitling in creating this new watch which embodies the strength and tenacity of IRONMAN triathletes,” says Messick.

    All three members of Breitling’s Triathlon Squad have distinguished themselves in IRONMAN triathlon events around the world. German triathlete Jan Frodeno is not only a 2008 Olympic gold medalist, but also a three-time IRONMAN World Champion and a two-time IRONMAN 70.3® World Champion. In 2019, Frodeno recorded a best overall course time at the IRONMAN World Championship®, winning in 7:51:13.

    Daniela Ryf, a native of Breitling’s home country of Switzerland, is a five-time IRONMAN 70.3 World Champion and four-time IRONMAN World Champion.

    The third squad member is Chris ‘Macca’ McCormack from Australia, who has claimed two IRONMAN World Championship titles – in 2007 and again in 2010. He also won the 2012 ITU Long Distance World Championships.

    All three represent the best in IRONMAN triathlon racing, which brings together three disciplines into the world’s most challenging single-day races, consisting of 2.4 miles (3.8 km) of swimming, 112 miles (180 km) of cycling, and 26.2 miles (42.2 km) of running.

    The new Endurance Pro IRONMAN collection serves athletes as well as luxury clients looking for the ultimate athleisure timepiece.

    Its 44 mm watch case is made out of Breitlight®, which is 3.3 times lighter than titanium and 5.8 times lighter than steel, but significantly harder. This exclusive high-tech material boasts exceptional resistance to scratches, traction, and corrosion. It also stands out for its anti-magnetic and anti-allergic properties, as well as its thermal stability, which gives it a warmer feel than metal.

    It’s powered by the Breitling Caliber 82, a COSC-certified thermocompensated SuperQuartz movement that is ten times more precise than regular quartz and offers a battery life of approximately three to four years.

    The bidirectional rotating bezel has engraved compass points, and the tactile molded crown provides excellent grip and maneuverability. The hour and minute hands are coated with Super-LumiNova®, making them legible even in limited lighting conditions. Along with a small-second subdial, there are 1/10th second and 30-minute chronograph counters that have also been designed for easy reading. The watch is water-resistant to 10 bar/100 meters/330 feet.

    At present there are two versions available: Endurance Pro IRONMAN and Endurance Pro IRONMAN Finisher. The former comes with a red dial featuring a black inner bezel with a pulsometer scale. The watch is presented on a red rubber strap with a Breitlight® double tang-type buckle. It features a unique IRONMAN inscription instead of the Breitling inscription. The latter – black accented with gold – is targeted at athletes who’ve completed an IRONMAN event. This version will be available exclusively through IRONMAN channels, and its caseback features a special IRONMAN Finisher Series engraving.

    The original Endurance Pro was inspired by the Breitling Sprint, a colorful and impressively lightweight watch from the 1970s. Its pulsometer made it ideal for athletes who wanted to monitor their heart rates.

    Watch this space for news of further watches that will complete the Endurance Pro IRONMAN collection.

    www.ironman.com

  • USA UK EU unusual triathlon deals: Segway (50% off), SUP, Wiggle Shoe finder, sustainable brands, FR55
    18 June 2021

    Black Friday - FINAL Wiggle Deals  good deals if you're quick

    The post USA UK EU unusual triathlon deals: Segway (50% off), SUP, Wiggle Shoe finder, sustainable brands, FR55 appeared first on the5krunner. The full post can be read now at the5krunner.

  • new Garmin Fenix 6, FEnix 5, Enduro features – Beta
    18 June 2021

    Added sleep tracking widget with sleep score and insights by Firstbeat Analytics
    Added metabolic calories

    The post new Garmin Fenix 6, FEnix 5, Enduro features – Beta appeared first on the5krunner. The full post can be read now at the5krunner.

  • Shimano Performance Selector for new Bib Shorts
    18 June 2021

    Do you have pro needs? Here is Shimano's free and unique bib short selector.

    The post Shimano Performance Selector for new Bib Shorts appeared first on the5krunner. The full post can be read now at the5krunner.

  • Packing for an Ultramarathon
    18 June 2021

    The art of success for any event is preparation. An ultra is tough both physically and mentally; you train hard ready for race day. However the foundations of race day come from your packing. It is important not to leave your packing until last minute when you are getting ready for an Ultramarathon. With shorter events you can get away with some non essential items, but there is so much to consider for an ultra, and you don’t want the added stress or discomfort if you forget something.

    Race day #flatlay

    I am just packing for Race To The King, so I thought I would share what I’m packing. However, it is important to note we are all different, and you need to practice with your kit to understand what you many need. Ask yourself how long you will be out running, will you be running in the dark, will you need a spare set of clothes, what impact will the weather have, and what are the aid stations like.

    For me, I am confident that I will run the 53 miles in day light, and the aid stations have everything I need to keep me going. So to be honest, I have packed more than I need. I remember running my first ultra with my camelbak mule absolutely full. The course makes a huge difference, so check out the aid stations, how frequent are they and do they stock food you will eat. Looking at the aid stations at Race To The King I could probably run with just water and pick up what I need, but I have packed fuel just to be sure I have what I need. The few Clif Blocks and Bars could keep me going throughout the race. I have also packed my 1.5 litre hydration pack as well as my two 600ml bottles, as it is the hydration I need to be careful with. It is easy to not drink enough, so I will make sure I keep these full at every aid station, better to run with too much water, than to run out.

    Not made it into my kit list today

    I have plasters for my nipples, and a couple of foil blankets for emergencies, but I’m not taking anything else. Basic kit, watch, hydration and fuel. I would consider a change of clothes and if I was stopping I would pack these in a spare bag, but I don’t plan on stopping. If anything went wrong I will have my mobile phone, and I prefer not to change clothes during a run anyway. My head torch and rain jacket are both possible extras, and if I was going into the night I would pack warm clothes, but as I expect to finish in the day, these will not make it in my kit list.

    Recovery gear

    Recovery is important, and as I will be staying away from home I have packed my recovery gear. When I finish I will need to wrap up warm, so I have a hood, plus my compression tights, massage gun and oofos are my usual combination.

    What do you back for an Ultra marathon?

    I have raised over £5,000 for Cancer Research so far in 2021, and want to do some good out of my crazy challenges. So if you can afford to contribute hit the button above. Thank you

  • UK update – 18 June
    18 June 2021

    As we move through the reopening process for parkrun and junior parkrun, we are publishing a UK-specific update every Friday to keep ambassadors, event teams, parkrun communities, and landowners informed on our progress. 

     

    5k in England

     

    On Monday evening, following the announcement by the government of the delay to Step 4, we confirmed that we were pushing back the return of parkrun events in England.

     

    This is because a number of permissions were contingent on the country moving to Step 4 and the associated restrictions being lifted.

     

    Despite this, we retain legal permission for parkrun events to resume, our COVID Framework continues to be valid and is approved by the government.

     

    With permission in place to restart over 520 parkrun events in England, we will now work towards reopening on Saturday 24 July.

     

    5k in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland

     

    It’s now only a week to go until 5k events return in Northern Ireland (Saturday 26 June). We would like to thank the ambassadors and event teams who have completed all the necessary checklists and confirmed relevant permissions, and look forward to welcoming back 5k events in Northern Ireland next weekend.

     

    In Scotland, we are still working towards Level 0 as the first opportunity for our 5k events to return. Following the statement by the First Minister earlier this week, we believe that this is now likely to be in late July or August. We are working with members of the Scottish Government to fully understand the implications of the published guidance for our larger events. Unfortunately until we receive this clarification we are not in a position to confirm a timeline for events to return.

     

    We continue to work with authorities and stakeholders in Wales to understand how and when 5k events can return there. At the moment, the situation remains that a lack of clarity around social distancing requirements means we’re unable to announce a decision on a return date just yet.

     

    junior parkrun

     

    We now have junior parkrun events open across Wales, Northern Ireland, and England, and, this coming Sunday, we are excited to welcome back the first of our junior events in Scotland.

     

    Currently junior parkrun in the UK allows 4 to 10 year olds to record a time and this will continue to be the case until our 5k events return. When 5k events do return (such as in Northern Ireland on 26 June) 11-14 year olds will be welcome to walk, jog or run at junior events once more.

     

    We are delighted to see older children volunteering, or occasionally accompanying younger siblings around the course, as we negotiate this interim period and settle back into our Sunday morning routine.

     

    If you’d like to get involved please do visit local event pages on the website, or check social media.

     

    ***

     

    Thank you, as always, for your continued support.

     

    Tom Williams

    Chief Operating Officer

    parkrun Global

     

    The post UK update – 18 June appeared first on parkrun UK Blog.

  • Matt’s top tips on getting active with a buggy
    18 June 2021

    Wondering how to fit in more family time, while keeping up your walking, jogging or running routine? Our friends at MINI have MINI Motivator, Matt, to show you the way.

     

    Matt not only volunteers at parkrun but also helps visually impaired runners in his spare time. He also leads a local running club, helping to keep fellow members active during lockdown. Let’s dig into his words of wisdom.

     

    As every parent knows, life’s a little easier with a tired child. Matt lets his daughter get involved, which ultimately makes his run easier. “Where possible I try to let her have a little run before I start mine”, Matt tells us. Matt believes it’s important to ease yourself in, advising “no pressure, especially if you’re just starting out in buggy running, as you’re getting into the swing of things try not to worry about how fast you’re going, or whether you’re achieving your usual PB.”

     

    We all need a little motivation now and again. To help, Matt suggests “join a group. There’s a plethora of online groups as well as local groups that will welcome you with open arms.”

     

    Whether it’s a solo marathon, or a 5k parkrun with the buggy, preparation is key. “Make sure you are well stocked with toys, drinks, snacks or whatever your co-pilots penchant of choice is.”

     

    Matt’s final thought to leave you with? “Most of all, don’t forget to enjoy it. I hate thinking about the day when I can no longer push my baby girl in her buggy, so embrace it and have fun together.”

     

    Head to our Instagram for more motivational tips from MINI. Or to nominate someone who’s helped keep you moving this past year, use the tag #MINIMotivators.

    MINI aren’t just out to bringing some motivational optimism to every Instagram scroll. They’re out to bring it to every drive too. Click here to check out their range, and get ready to discover just how much fun you could have on four wheels.  

    The post Matt’s top tips on getting active with a buggy appeared first on parkrun UK Blog.

Trail Running blogs

Trail Running Blogs

20 June 2021

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  • Garmin Forerunner 55 Initial Review: Accurate, Legible, 33g Light, Full Garmin Eco System, $200
    20 June 2021

     Article by Sam Winebaum

    Garmin Forerunner 55 ($200)


    I am testing the just released Forerunner 55. At $200 it is very light on the wallet and on the wrist at 33g with only the Coros Pace 2 (RTR Review) a few grams lighter. 


    Fully capable as a training watch with most commonly used data fields available, it only leaves out some of the more sophisticated physiological evaluation metrics, navigation and usable altimeter, and some battery life but still has  a very respectable 20 hours training time and my initial run test indicates it definitely meets that spec.

    As far as smart watch features and health tracking, it includes all the Garmin standards such as heart rate stats, steps, calories, sleep quality, VO2 max and race time estimates, Body Battery (recovery), weather, notifications, calendar, music control, incident Detection and assistance (with phone in the mix) and recent run totals. All are accessible in summary and in detail from a handy single screen as widgets.


    Obviously Garmin is looking at the Coros Pace 2 as a key competitor. While the Pace 2 has longer battery life (30 hours training plus an ultra mode) and a barometric altimeter whose readings can be used in data screens,  I think, so far, it lags in smart watch features and overall ecosystem.. 


    Data collected and displayed in the Garmin Connect app during my first day is below:




    While its display dimensions are 1.04” vs the more common 1.2” and its resolution is 208 x 208 vs the usual 240 x 240, the screen is highly legible with Garmin’s nice fat fonts in the 3 data field view and superb trans reflectivity even at angles. 

    Why other brands don’t do this I don’t know… Looking at you Suunto 9 Peak with its thin fonts and dimmer trans reflectivity and where I had to squint on today’s run with it on my other wrist unless the sun hit the screen right and I know from testing that in dim light the backlight is weak.

    Graphs: DC Analyser

    My first run demonstrated accurate wrist HR on my dominant wrist. I had the Suunto 9 Peak (Initial Review) on my non-dominant wrist (blue above) and it struggled to find an accurate heart rate at the start of the run and after my many stops for pictures and to chat with friends I met on the trails in Round Valley, Park City. The lighter and smaller the watch I find the more accurate optical heart rate is especially on my dominant wrist. The 55 weighs a significant 20g less than the Suunto 9.

    GPS accuracy appears excellent. In the screenshot above you can see how closely both track to the actual trail. And the beautiful titanium bezel Peak is a $699 watch..not $200 as here.

    While there is no barometric altimeter called out in the Garmin specs and no data fields available for Ascent, Descent, Altitude and such, export of the data file shows an elevation profile remarkably close (purple above) to the Suunto 9 Peak (blue above)  who's on board altimeter is renowned during my test run. Is there one actually on board but “disabled” from view or am I looking at GPS data correlated from the track I am not sure. 


    More testing to come, but if you are training with a Forerunner 10, 15, 35, 45, 225, or 235 or any 3 to 4 year old watch (as all brands have improved accuracy and battery life in recent years), the Forerunner 55 is clearly a great new option. Need those extras of altimeter data view, deeper performance stats, 4 more hours of battery life, and breadcrumb navigation look at the 245 at $150 more. 


    If you have a “heavy '' watch that weighs you down and you struggle with wrist heart rate with it and just need the more essential and training basics, data field configurability, and full smartwatch capabilities the 55 is also a great new choice.


    Garmin's compare tool where I compare the F45, F245, and F55 is here


    The Forerunner 55 is available now including at our partners below

    Tested samples were provided at no charge for review purposes. No other compensation was received by RTR or the authors for this review beyond potential commissions from the shopping links in the article. The opinions herein are entirely the authors'.

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  • Neurological vs. Metabolic Training For Trail Running
    19 June 2021

    Written by Stephen R. Santangelo for the Summer 2021 edition of our Trail Times newsletter. Stephen has been in the fitness industry since 1979 and created his own specialty exercises & programs based upon the anthropological movement of the human body.

    Metabolic training is the most common and the most emphasized for any trail runner. Races from 800 meters and longer have an aerobic and anaerobic component of energy contribution, such as anaerobic alactic, anaerobic glycolytic, lactate tolerance, cardiovascular strength, aerobic capacity and aerobic efficiency. Depending upon which one’s chosen competitive distance determines which energy system is emphasized.

    However, there are neurological adaptations which need to be closely examined. The nervous system consists of the central nervous system (CNS), the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and the autonomic nervous system (ANS). Together these three components integrate all physical, emotional, and intellectual activities. Let’s focus on the physical, which includes the importance of proper muscular firing patterns.

    Neurological integrity is the ability of musculoskeletal chains to operate in proper sequence for effective force transfer and movement efficiency. The greater the efficiency, the faster one runs and with less fatigue. Fatigue is diminished when the CNS/muscular sequencing are working in harmony rather than being antagonistic. Neuroplasticity is developed though movement skills rather than just getting stronger in the weight room chasing numbers and reps.

    Neurological tolerance refers to the capacity of tendons, ligaments and joints to withstand a progressive increase in physical training and muscle work. It is the ability of these tissues to resist fatigue and injury. This capacity is essential for all athletes. The development of neurological integrity is not accomplished solely with strength training as is often promoted.

    How can we better develop neuro sequencing to improve athleticism? This is accomplished through structural integrity which refers to the synergistic capacity of musculoskeletal chains to operate in balance for effective force transfer and movement efficiency.

    The correct firing pattern is glute, hamstring, quadratus lumborum (QL) or more commonly known as the lumbar or lower back.

    • Incorrect pattern #1: Hamstring, Contralateral QL, Glute = hamstring issues
    • Incorrect pattern #2: Contralateral QL, hamstring, glute = tight low back due to too much core bracing which can lead to future disc issues.
    • Incorrect pattern #3: Bracing abs first

    The correct pattern is to activate glutes first which is demonstrated with specific exercises.

    The above points apply to gym workouts and running. The answer is biomechanical loading patterns based on recruitment of neural responses in proper sequencing. Perfecting the activity of the central nervous system (CNS) under stress and low or high physical involvement takes dedication by adding specific neural training as part of the warm up, regardless, if the day’s protocol is an easy recovery run, hill repeats or VO₂ max.

    The next neurological response are the respiratory centers which control the rate of breathing are in the brainstem or medulla, all part of the nervous system. The nerve cells that live within these centers automatically send signals to the diaphragm, serratus and intercostal muscles to contract and relax at regular intervals, therefore, one must train according to the natural function of the anatomy.

    Specialized nerve cells within the aorta and carotid arteries called peripheral chemoreceptors monitor the oxygen concentration of the blood. One aspect of training is to develop maximum oxygen capacity – effortlessly – to optimize lung capacity and to prevent hydrogen ion concentration which has an acidic effect on the blood reducing oxygen carrying cells.

    There are many neurological training methods. List below are the 3 most effective neurological exercises for trail runners at all levels.

    Exercise #1:

    Lie in a prone/neutral position, arms to the side with palms up. Palms up is the correct anatomical structure which helps opens the chest and lifts the rib cage. Flex/squeeze the glutes hard. Raise one leg and both arms approximately 6 inches off the ground. Hold for an 8-count, relax the glutes, repeat with opposite leg. Do 3 repetitions for each side. Breathing during this particular neuro-training is absolutely imperative. Generally, trainees have a tendency to hold their breath while performing isometric type exercises. In the photos, the chest and diaphragm are greatly expanded through deep breaths. A single inhalation and exhalation are required for the 8-count. This is not an ab exercise. Firing the glutes first will activate the hamstrings, second and the QL third. This is the proper sequence.

    Exercise #2:

    Lie in a prone/neutral position, arms to the side with palms up. Move feet toward the hips, knees out, so, the legs are in a butterfly position. Flex/squeeze the glutes hard. Press the soles of your feet together. Raise the hips high and raise both arms approximately 6 inches off the ground. Hold for an 8-count, relax the glutes, repeat 3 times. Breathe as directed in Exercise #1. This position will internally rotate the femur/hip connection.

    Exercise #3

    Lie in a prone/neutral position, arms to the side with palms up. Place the knees and feet together. Push the heels out hard keeping the toes together and knees together. Flex/squeeze the glutes hard. Raise the hips high and raise both arms approximately 6 inches off the ground. Keep pressing the knees together, tightly, as if you are holding a dime between them. Hold for an 8-count, lower the hips and relax the glutes, repeat 3 times. Breathe as directed in Exercise #1. This will externally rotate the femur/hip connection.

    Each of these positions will pattern different parts of the glute/hamstring connection, along with developing the stabilizing muscles in adduction and abduction positions. After a training session, repeat Exercise #1. This will reinforce firing patterns and relax the hamstrings preventing them from shortening.

    For more tips about training for trail running check out these articles in the Trail News section of this website.

    The post Neurological vs. Metabolic Training For Trail Running appeared first on ATRA.

  • Mike Ambrose: From an Ultrarunning Dream to Designing the Salomon Ultra Glide Trail Shoe
    18 June 2021

    The post Mike Ambrose: From an Ultrarunning Dream to Designing the Salomon Ultra Glide Trail Shoe appeared first on iRunFar.

    When Mike Ambrose started working for Vertical Runner, a running store in Breckenridge, Colorado in 2014, he was excited to have landed his ideal job. Having moved to Colorado from the U.S. East Coast with a group of friends, living in the mountains with trails at his doorstep, and working a job that allowed him to share his love of trail running with others, it was living the dream. A simple life, surrounded by nature, and with Mount Royal at the edge of the Tenmile Range as his backyard run, it was the perfect place to be a young ultrarunner. He lived on the cheap, found jobs that supported his needs, and embraced a simple, trail running-focused lifestyle.

    If you’d told him at the time that in 2021, he would be a lead product line manager for Salomon, living in Annecy, France, he probably wouldn’t have believed you. It seemed unlikely that a psychology college graduate who started running 5ks around his neighborhood for exercise would find himself creating some of the most technologically advanced shoes on the market halfway across the world.

    The new Salomon Ultra Glide trail running shoe is the culmination of Mike’s years of experience in various aspects of the sport, as a runner, salesperson, technical representative, marketing specialist, and finally, as Salomon’s lead product line manager for trail running. But in the end, it’s also a result of a fateful click on an internet video while online shopping for something completely unrelated.

    Mike Ambrose and the Salomon Ultra Guide trail running shoe. Photo courtesy of Mike Ambrose.

    Mike wasn’t born into the outdoor mountain lifestyle. “I didn’t see a mountain in person until I was 19 or 20 years old,” he says. “I grew up in suburban New Jersey. We did vacations at Disney World when we were lucky. I worked in a mall. I wasn’t this connected to nature as a kid or anything. I played baseball and basketball, but I never really ran. Running was punishment.”

    Like many people who’ve found their passion in ultrarunning, Mike started running just to stay in shape. Running a 10k around his Deptford neighborhood in 2008 was monumental. From there, things progressed quickly. He ran his first marathon in 2010, and in a moment of serendipity, came upon a trail running video of ultrarunning superstar Krissy Moehl on the Patagonia website while looking for a new wetsuit. Immediately interested, he dove into whatever he could find on the sport of running in the mountains, learning of Dean Karnazes, Scott Jurek, and Anton Krupicka.

    Intrigued by the idea of trail running, he signed up to run the JFK 50 Mile with a friend. “I just wanted to go on an adventure and get my feet wet and try it. I thought it would be a challenge, and just be a journey.”

    He was hooked. He ran his first 100-mile race, the Umstead 100 Mile, the next year, and with a steady diet of Salomon TV episodes as fuel and inspiration, he fell in love with the brand and hatched a plan to head west. “I saw what Colorado trail runners were doing. I just felt like I had to do it. It just seemed like the best thing in the world, to live this life that was simple and based around just being in the mountains all day.” It was an exciting time in ultrarunning in the U.S., and Mike was seeing it all for the first time. He watched as Anton Krupicka shaved down his shoes for the Western States 100 and as Kilian Jornet emerged as a running phenom.

    Mike (left) running the 2019 Transalpine Run with friend and teammate Josh Korn. Photo: Klaus Fengler

    In 2012, a train from Penn Station in Pennsylvania to Denver, Colorado delivered Mike and two friends to the base of the Rockies. Hitchhiking and walking around Colorado that summer, he immediately fell in love with the mountains. He invited Stephanie Lefferts, his then girlfriend and now wife, out to meet them, and they spent a few weeks driving around the West. The draw of Summit County was strong, and after finding an affordable place to live in Frisco, they got jobs and decided to stay.

    It wasn’t long before he moved over the pass to Leadville, finding work at the City on a Hill coffee shop and becoming fully immersed in the running culture of the small mountain town. He became friends with Bill Dooper, ultrarunning’s super fan who passed away in 2018, and built a strong community of people around himself. Listening to Mike talk about Leadville, his love for the town and the surrounding mountains is apparent.

    “I remember a few early shifts, 5:00 a.m., where we’d just grab our puffy jackets and go stand outside and watch the alpenglow on the mountains. I always said it’s really great to live somewhere where you just want to go outside and take a picture of what you see every day.” And the trails were endless. “You’ve got the Boulevard, you’ve got Turquoise Lake, you’re a short drive from Half Moon Trailhead and the Colorado Trail, and obviously Mounts Elbert and Massive are there.”

    Mike and his wife Stephanie eating a tart mid-run in Europe. Photo: Giles Ruck

    Slinging coffee, running, racing, and living at 10,000 feet in the shadow of Colorado’s tallest mountains all fit Mike well. With his growing knowledge of trails in the area and reputation as a runner, he helped the organizers of the Ultra Race of Champions design a race route from Breckenridge to Vail. Through this, he became friends with the then owner of Vertical Runner in Breckenridge and was offered a job. He jumped on the opportunity. “At the time, I was like, it doesn’t really get any better than this.”

    Still a Salomon fan, both of their shoes and company as a whole, he relished being able to sell their products and get others out on the trails, his passion for the sport contagious. When a job opened as a tech rep for Salomon in New England, he was quick to apply. He had firsthand knowledge of how shoes performed through his own running and racing, and now he’d seen the sales aspect of the running industry as well. Plus, he still loved the Salomon videos that had helped him get into trail running in the first place.

    While his stay in Colorado was short, it’s obvious he packed a lot into that time. “We lived a lifetime in those three years. We were 25-year-old kids living in a beautiful place and had jobs that supported it.” He raced ultras often, finishing the Leadville Trail 100 Mile twice during his time there, but it was the San Juan Solstice 50 Mile that left the deepest impression. He’d driven down to the start with friends, including Bill Dooper, camped on someone’s lawn, and woken up at 3:30 a.m. to freezing temperatures to run. While he raced well, it was clearly the people who made the race special.

    “[Bill] Dooper was a half mile from the finish line and walks out, doing a little walk, and that was a huge part of it. Having a good day, and having a good day for Bill. To me, that’s the high point of anything I’ve ever done in running. Afterward, we took Bill for ice-cream sodas and milkshakes. He said, ‘I’ve never had a $5 milkshake before, let alone two in a day!’”

    Bill Dooper cheering Mike as he finished the San Juan Solstice 50 Mile. Photo: Stephanie Lefferts

    The move to Boston, Massachusetts to work for Salomon in 2015 was another dream come true. He spent a year there, learning everything he could, and when a marketing specialist job for Salomon opened up in Ogden, Utah at Salomon’s U.S. headquarters, it was a natural progression. The same way Mike’s passion for the sport and gear had him moving from running 10ks around the neighborhood to 100-mile races in a relatively short period of time, it now had him taking on increasing responsibility at Salomon. Surrounded by a solid team, he found success at the company that he’d admired since he first started running.

    When the global headquarters of Salomon in France wanted to bring a distinctly North American perspective to their product design, Mike was an obvious choice for their new product line manager for trail running. Trails in the U.S. are different than those in Europe, as are the markets for shoes. Few brands have been successful in both places.

    After years of running and racing in Salomon shoes, selling them, and talking to retailers and other runners about them, he now had the opportunity to design them. He has a simple goal for all of the shoes that he designs. “I want someone, every time they put on a pair of Salomons, to feel like they can fly, that they can do anything.”

    Mike designed the new Ultra Glide trail running shoe to do exactly that. Mike wanted a shoe that would fill out the Salomon line with a model that is both high performance and comfortable for ultramarathon distances. He wanted something for the runners who found other shoes too narrow, or too firm, or too overbuilt. He wanted to design a shoe that anyone could love running in.

    The Salomon Ultra Glide. Photo: iRunFar

    Under Mike’s watchful eye, Salomon created a shoe that is soft, responsive, light, and stable. Taking a three-out-of-three approach, they aimed for a shoe that would fit well by striking a compromise between width and foothold, that would be soft without being mushy, and that would have good grip. The result is a performance-oriented 274-gram shoe for a U.S. men’s size 9 with the cushion to provide comfort over long distances.

    For a Salomon shoe, the stack height is tall, with 38 millimeters at the heel and 32mm at the toe, making a 6mm heel-to-toe drop. The ultra-soft Energy Surge midsole is paired with a modern rocker design for a smooth and responsive feel. Extra foam in the forefoot as well as Salomon’s version of a rock plate, Profeel Film, provides additional protection against rocks without adding excessive stiffness.

    Built on a road running last, the Ultra Glide is a higher volume shoe than many other trail offerings from Salomon, but thanks to the SensiFit wings and the Quicklace system, it still fits snugly to handle technical terrain. With 4mm lugs and a full Contagrip MA outsole, it’s ready for anything. The Ultra Glide will be available for order on August 1, 2021.

    It’s clear from talking to Mike that he’s proud of the end result. “Our athletes love it, runners love it, everyone loves it.”

    Mike’s love of running is apparent in his approach to design. “You know that feeling when you feel like you can go anywhere, you feel like you can do anything? That’s the best feeling in the world. I think that’s what I aspire for all trail runners to do and feel.” From watching videos of Krissy Moehl to designing the Salomon Ultra Glide, the passion for running and the places two feet and a pair of shoes can take you has been a constant. And in talking to Mike, you get the impression that his dedication to the sport is as strong as ever.

    [Editor’s Note: This article is sponsored by Salomon. Learn more about the men’s version and women’s version of the Salomon Ultra Glide trail running shoe.]

    Mike running in his current home of Annecy, France. Photo: Bryson White

    Mike Ambrose: From an Ultrarunning Dream to Designing the Salomon Ultra Glide Trail Shoe by Sponsored Post.

  • Skechers Performance GO Run Max Road 5 Initial Video Review
    18 June 2021

    Article by Sam Winebaum

    Skechers Performance GO Run Max Road 5 ($135)


    The Max Road gets a carbon infused H plate and new engineered mesh upper to help tame and direct the sometimes wild ride of this super light 8.3 oz/ 235g (US9), giant 38/32 mm stack height trainer with a supercritical Hyperburst midsole. 

    Does it work? Please watch the initial video review to find out.

    WATCH THE GO RUN MAX ROAD INITIAL VIDEO REVIEW (10:02)

    Tested samples were provided at no charge for review purposes. No other compensation was received by RTR or the authors for this review beyond potential commissions from the shopping links in the article. The opinions herein are entirely the authors'.

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  • Testbericht: Saucony Ride 14 (German)
    18 June 2021

    Article by Johannes Klein

    Link zum original RTR-Test des Saucony Ride 14: HIER

    Link zu allen RTR-Testberichten: HIER

    Saucony Ride 14 (140 €)



    Einleitung
    Da ich vor 6 Jahren im Ride 9 meinen ersten Halbmarathon gelaufen bin, hat der Allzweckschuh von Saucony einen gewissen Nostalgie-Faktor für mich.
    Mit dem Ride 13 (RTR Testbericht) durfte ich nun letztes Jahr unsere Beziehung wieder aufleben lassen – mit gemischten Gefühlen.
    Durch seine stabile, aber schwerfällige Gangart und das recht hohe Gewicht mutete der Ride 13 im Vergleich zu seiner Konkurrenz ein wenig veraltet an, besonders im Vergleich zu Sauconys eigener Endorphin-Reihe, die sich durch ihren energiegeladenen Charakter auszeichnet. 
    Vor allem am Obermaterial hatten Nils und Ich einige verbesserungswürdige Aspekte gefunden. Dieses Jahr habe nur ich den Ride 14 nach Karlsruhe geschickt bekommen, also war es an mir, zu überprüfen, ob sich Saucony die Kritik am Ride 13 zu Herzen genommen hat.

    CLICK to Read more »
  • K-WAY VOB TRAIL RUNNING: WEEKEND CONFIRMATIONS
    18 June 2021


    Hi All

     

    Here are some runs for the weekend.

     

     

    SATURDAY 19 JUNE 2021

     

    K-WAY VOB TRAIL RUNNING GROUPS (all runners welcome regardless of club or even no club)

     

     

    TABLE MOUNTAIN TRAILERS (K-WAY VOB MEDIUM DISTANCE GROUP)

     

    Please be aware of our runs under strict COVID protocols 

    • No gathering in a big group at start or end of the run
    • All runners to carry a mask or buff
    • Practice social distancing
    • We will break into small groups as per regulations while we run
    • No personal sign in – ensure the leader ticks you in/out. Please carry emergency contact numbers in your bag or on your wrist/shoe
    • We will monitor the groups on a weekly basis for size
    • VOB reserves the right to stop TMT if the COVID infections increase again in the Western Cape
    • If you have any symptoms or have been in contact with anyone with symptoms, please stay at home
    • If you are not comfortable with group running yet, you can use the maps to enjoy the routes in your own time

     

    Route
    This coming Saturday we will be returning to Cape Point for an old favourite the Olifantsbos- Sirkelsvlei route.  See attached map

    We start from the parking area at the end of the t***d road run across the sand towards the beach, then follow the "shipwreck route"  around Olifants Point to the remains of the Nolloth. Here we turn left and up the coastal sand dune and follow the path to the 3 way junction where we turn hard right and follow the path to Sirkelsvlei..  Run along the Western shore of the vlei and take the path that leads through the "Arch" to the cliff overlooking the parking area. Down the footpath back to the cars. . 

    Rendezvous and start time

    The main Gate to the Cape Point Nature Reserve only opens at 0800 and they take their time to process visitors so please  get there early.
    Entrance Fee
    You will need your ID Card and a SanParks Green/Wild card, otherwise SA Citizens pay R85 per head at the gate.

    Drive about 2 km along the main road towards Cape Point and look out for the turn off to your Right which takes you to Olifantsbos.   Just follow the road to the T junction, turn Left and drive to the parking area at the very end of the road. ready for a 0830 Start

    Terrain and distance

    Gentle undulating fynbos and sandy track running with an odd climb or two. Nothing too technical and no terrifying exposure to heights.  Distance about 10km.

    Saturday's Forecast is Sunny Fine Weather.

    Groups
    This will be decided on the morning.

    It is planned to have a Relaxed group and a Brisk Walking group .

    ImportantPlease remember to look behind you at every turn in the route to make sure the people behind you see which way you are going.   
    Leaders of each group will ensure that no-one is left behind. Please keep the groups together and ensure that no-one is left on their own.

    Hope to see you there

    Peter,
    Sortie organizer

    082 374 6262

    *If you are new to this group, please read Table Mountain Trailers' guidelines here: www.tablemountaintrailers.org.za  

     

    K-Way VOB's Medium Distance
    Trail Running Group

    Webbsite:http:// www.kwayvob.co.za

    Blog: http://vobtrailwrg.blogspot.com/

     

    Warning:  Trail running is inherently more dangerous than road running.  It takes place over uneven hazard strewn trails in exposed and often remote terrain where help is not always readily available.  

    Participation is voluntary and entirely at your own risk as although the organizers take reasonable precautions to ensure runner safety, it cannot be guaranteed.  To this end neither the Club nor the organisers personally can be held liable for any claims relating to inter alia, injuries, disabilities and death. Further any minor child participating in any trail running activity will be deemed to be doing so with the consent of his or her guardian.

    By starting out on a trail run you explicitly acknowledge that: 1] you understand the associated risks involved and accept full responsibility for your own safety. 2] you are medically and physically fit to participate and 3] are carrying the necessary water, clothing and safety equipment required for the particular run.

     

     

     

     

    SUNDAY 20 JUNE 2021

     

     

    MATES SUNDAY RUN – 20 JUNE 2021

     

    Kloof Nek Parking Info Centre

    7.30am

    This week's route brought to you by Justin. Every week we invite a MATES runner new or old to give us a route. Who wants next week?

     

    This Sunday MATES keeps things super simple with a route for everyone to enjoy!

     

    We meet at Kloof Nek Parking Info Centre from where its Pipe Track views of the Atlantic all the way to Corridor Ravine, up we go hanging a left at the top to follow Apostles Track. Just past Woody Ravine, hook a right onto Old Railway Track and continue to the Waterworks Museum [for those wanting extra miles, go right to do a lap of Hely-Hutchinson Reservior], BUT for the main pack we go left and left again onto Echo Valley Track. 1km on it's a right, past Grotto Cave to head towards the top of Plattklip. Down we go hoping for only a little traffic, left onto contour at the stream, under the cables and down Kloof Corner home for a cold one with good company and the best views of the City Bowl.

     

    18km, 1000m, various paces, and remember to bring own drinks for after the run!

     

    See you there,

    MATES Crew

     

     

     

    Durbac-CMC Pack Run (Sunday): All runners welcome.  Not just for Durbac and CMC members.

     

    NO RUN THIS WEEK

     

     

     

     

    Whatever you're up to, have a great weekend.

     

     

    Cheers

     

    The K-Way VOB Trail Team

     

     

    Tim Bellairs

    K-Way VOB Trail Running

    Cell: 082 321-0299

    Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


  • When My Passion Nearly Killed Me
    18 June 2021

    The following chapter is an excerpt from Hillary Allen’s Book, Out And Back. You can get your own copy here. 

    In August of 2017, ranked number one in the world skyrunning circuit, I signed up for one of the hardest ultrarunning races in the world: the Tromsø Skyrace in Norway. Tromsø was one of my last races of the season and a dream opportunity for me. I had never been to that part of the world, and the competition gave me the chance to test my running in a way I never had before. It was also a way to explore a new place, by foot—my favorite method.

    When race day came, I was motivated, inspired, and physically in top form. The odds were in my favor not only to complete the race, but to win. The weather that day was perfect. I felt great, and for the first three hours, I performed great. I was at my best. But as I climbed the most technical ridge on the course, a rock gave way. With one step I felt the ground give way beneath my feet—and the horizon turned upside down.

    I was airborne.

    Ian CorlessIan Corless

    I was falling off the edge of a cliff.

    I felt the first impact, then the second, then the third.

    I hit the ground again and again and again. With each impact, I felt bones breaking, skin ripping. I grasped for something, anything, to stop my momentum, but I didn’t know which way was up, and as soon as I hit the ground I was spinning and airborne once again. I heard my own voice, floating somewhere above my head, declaring to me, calmly, “Hillary, this is it. You’re dying.”

    This was my death.

    Relax.

    You’ve got to relax.

    Breathe.

    It will all be over soon.

    I came to on the mountainside. Somewhere between the six points of impact and the 150 feet I had fallen, I lost consciousness. I remember the vivid pain when I came to. The world was throbbing, pulsing in and out. I couldn’t see straight . . . only blurred shapes amid the blackout pain. I screamed out when the pain came, hoping that yelling would somehow release the intensity of the agony rushing over me. I felt like I was being suffocated. Unable to breathe or relax, I kicked my legs out of reflex and frustration. Then I thought to myself, You’re moving your legs; that’s a good sign. You’re not paralyzed. But then the pain would rush back. I shut my eyes tight, and flashes of red and yellow danced across my eyelids. It hurt so much I had to stop moving.

    RELATED: 5 Things We Learned from Out and Back by Hillary Allen

    Somehow, I realized, I was only in my socks. My shoes must have flown off my feet somewhere along the way down the mountainside, as I spiraled through the air like a tomahawk. I couldn’t move my arms or hands, but tried to anyway. When I looked down, all I saw was a bundle of bones that didn’t look like arms, and my wrists were turned the wrong way. There was so much blood. What was happening? I thought. What had just happened? I was confused, scared, and stranded—alone on the mountainside.

    Suddenly there was a voice, and the face of another runner I vaguely recalled seeing earlier in the race. I had passed him as we ascended the steep part of the ridgeline, and we exchanged some words of encouragement. Why was he here now? Had he fallen too?

    His arms were wrapped around me. His face was close to mine. Had he been here the whole time? He covered me with an emergency blanket—which was somehow still in the pack I was carrying—and later his jacket. He braced me and stayed with me, making sure I didn’t fall any further down the mountainside.

    Manu was his name, as I learned later. He had seen the rock fall, and me with it. Trained in first aid and wilderness responder training, Manu scrambled down the ridgeline after me.

    Ian Corless

    Others had seen me fall too. My good friend Ian Corless, a professional photographer who worked for the Skyrunner World Series, was perched on the summit of the ridgeline waiting for my arrival, but as I came around the corner, what he saw through his lens wasn’t what he expected. Another good friend, Martina Valmassoi, was with Ian. Martina, a professional ski mountaineer, runner, and photographer for the sporting goods company Salomon, was terrified when she saw me fall off the cliff. They both thought they had just witnessed my death. Panicked, they quickly called race director Kilian Jornet, who called the mountain rescue team. Martina, Ian, and Kilian scrambled their way down to me on the side of the mountain.

    As I lay there, seeing the fear in their eyes, their features expressed what I was already thinking: I’m dying.

    Martina put her puffy jacket over me, mostly to cover the blood but also to keep me warm. My body convulsed, either from pain, loss of blood, or shock—I couldn’t tell which. I focused on Martina’s voice as she stroked my head and told me it would all be OK. As I continued to cry out in pain, she looked to Ian and Kilian with worried eyes full of urgency, desperation, and despair.

    Where was the rescue team?

    After an agonizing thirty minutes, I heard the bellowing sound of the helicopter. As it approached, the vibrations of its blades and the wind created in its wake pulsed over me. The rescue operation was starting. A doctor lowered onto the ridgeline and scrambled down to me to assess the damage. “Inhale,” he told me as he sprayed something up my nose, some sort of painkiller. It dulled the pain, but not my confusion. My eyes took in the shapes of their faces . . . they were still full of fear.

    From that point on things moved quickly. There was a lot of movement. There was a lot of pain. Ian, Kilian, Manu, Martina, and the doctor tried to stabilize me. They shuffled rocks around, trying to make room to hoist me up onto the cot. The agony was unbearable. Any slight movement sent pain shooting throughout my body. With every movement, I yelled out in anguish, my cries eventually dissipating into a whisper. I didn’t know where the pain was exactly. I couldn’t pinpoint it or figure out where it originated from—I felt it all over. As I was secured to the cot, the doctor fastened himself by my side and signaled to the helicopter pilot, who flew upward and outward from the side of Hamperokken Ridge. The feeling of falling swept over me again, and I closed my eyes tight.

    RELATED: Rage On! Tommy Rivers Puzey Is Improving, But Still Battling Cancer

    Breathe. It will all be over soon.

    Once inside the helicopter, I heard myself whimpering. The vibrations of the chopper sent pain signals pulsing throughout my body. I looked to the doctor and asked, tears streaming down my face, “Am I going to be OK?”

    His eyes met mine, trying to comfort me, as he replied, “We’re going to the hospital; they will take care of you.”

    Once we arrived at the hospital I was in and out of consciousness. Everything was fast-paced, and so many faces surrounded me, cutting off my clothes, peering into my eyes with lights, asking me questions.

    Could I move my legs or arms? Did I know who I was? Who was my emergency contact? I remember reciting my mother’s phone number and giving them her full name. I had to call her. One of the head doctors told me we would contact her soon, but first I needed X-rays and an MRI to assess my internal injuries. Time was of the essence. Tearfully I asked again, “Am I going to be OK?” She gazed at me and in her Norwegian accent said, “We are going to do the best we can.”

    Johanna Siring

    When I came out of the MRI, that same doctor took my hand. Astonishment evident in her voice, she said, “We are so surprised, Hillary. You have no internal bleeding and your legs are not broken, but you need to go into surgery to clean out your wounds and fix your arms.” I asked for my mother again, but there was no time. I was rushed off into surgery.

    After surgery, back in the hospital bed, the memory of the accident played in my mind over and over again. Every time I started to drift off to sleep, I felt like I was spinning in the air, crashing into the side of the mountain. I saw the faces of the doctors who rescued me. I remembered the feeling of being airlifted, the doctor hanging off the side of the cot as I was hoisted up into the helicopter. And the pain, red, pulsing through me with the vibrations of the helicopter.

    I didn’t know if I was going to be OK. I didn’t know how bad it was. And the fear of the unknown was almost as biting as the pain.

    When I awoke after the initial shock and surgeries, I recounted my injuries. I had broken a total of fourteen bones—including my back (vertebrae L4 and L5 in multiple locations), multiple ribs, both wrists, and my feet—one badly sprained ankle, and a serious rupture of a ligament in the other foot. I also had a concussion, and too many lacerations to count.

    The helicopter had transferred me to the nearest hospital, in Tromsø, Norway. That’s where I lay in the hospital bed, unable to

    I was still in denial. What accident? What had happened? Someone fell? Who fell? Was it me? Why couldn’t I move? Why was I there? I was scared and alone.

    move. Friends and other athletes from the race came to visit me, but it was all a blur. Drowning in the intense pain, and yearning for my mind to stop replaying the fall, I swam in and out of consciousness. When I called the nurse for more morphine, it wasn’t to stop the pain, but rather to numb my thoughts—the warm rush that fell over my body allowed my mind to become quiet, and to drift off to sleep.

    I don’t remember much from those brief moments of consciousness or the faces who came to visit, or even what they said to me about the accident. I was still in denial. What accident? What had happened? Someone fell? Who fell? Was it me? Why couldn’t I move? Why was I there? I was scared and alone. I hadn’t been able to speak with my mother yet, or with anyone from home. Emelie Forsberg, a friend and co-race director with Kilian, told me she had spoken with her and she was on the way to see me.

    I was scheduled for another surgery on my wrist the day my mother arrived at the hospital. When her face appeared in the doorway of my room, I broke down crying. The look in my mother’s eyes—of fear, concern, sadness, and simultaneous relief—caused reality to crash over me. I knew, right then, it wasn’t a dream. I was the one who had fallen, almost died, and yet somehow managed to survive.

    The next few days were brutal. In an instant I had gone from being extremely fit and capable to utterly dependent. I couldn’t move or even get out of my hospital bed. I was weak, I was in pain, and my spirit was broken. I hadn’t moved from my bed in five days. My mother saw me slipping away into depression, wanting to give up. The nursing staff saw it too. I was giving up.

    One day one of the nurses told me, quietly and frankly, “This isn’t the end for you, Hillary. Now it’s time to fight. It’s time to move out of this bed. You are not done yet.” She swung my legs over the side of the bed and practically carried me over to a chair in the shower, where she helped wash my body and hair. The exertion it took to move made me nauseous.

    The next day, I decided to get out of bed to have breakfast in the chair next to my hospital bed. It probably took me thirty minutes to move there, with my mother’s help. When the nurse came in and saw me sitting near the window, she smiled and took my vitals. My spirit wasn’t completely broken yet. I started to try. Every day I did just a little bit more. I went on “walks” down the hospital corridors with my mother. We found rooms or patios where the sun streamed in, overlooking the fjords.

    I stayed in the hospital in Norway for two weeks before I had the strength and medical clearance to fly home to Colorado. But traveling internationally with my injuries was no easy feat. I couldn’t walk, and Tromsø doesn’t have a very big airport, or planes large enough to accommodate wheelchair access. So, my mother talked to Maeve Sloane, my athlete manager with The North Face, who arranged for a private jet to fly to Tromsø and take me to an international airport.

    The pilot of the private jet was nervous to take me, given my condition, and hired a medical assistant to accompany me on the flight. The assistant basically carried me on and off of the airplane. We flew into Munich, Germany, where a team of experts hoisted me onto a special chair built for handicapped passengers and carried me off the plane.

    Johanna Siring

    A wheelchair service waited for me inside the airport. I had a direct flight from Munich to Denver. It was my first time to fly first class on an international flight. Thankfully, I was able to lie down and rest in my big seat—in between taking painkillers and injections of blood thinners. I was overwhelmed with gratitude to Maeve and The North Face for arranging it all and getting me home safely.

    Back in Colorado, I went straight to the doctor’s office to reassess my injuries. First, I saw a hand specialist. After numerous X-rays, the doctor let me know that things weren’t healing correctly. My left arm, which had rods and pins sticking out of it, was externally fixed. But my doctor wasn’t happy with the status of the bone. He wanted to remove the hardware and put in a plate and screws internally to ensure proper healing. He told me if I continued healing as the bones were set now, I would have early arthritis and a limited range of motion.

    I saw his point. So, I agreed to do the surgery. But he wasn’t done. My right wrist was casted, with no hardware. It was healing, and the break wasn’t as bad as the left wrist, but my doctor said that wrist needed surgery too—a plate and screws.

    Two surgeries. He could do them on Thursday. It was already Tuesday. I needed a moment to think. I had never broken a bone before, never had major orthopedic surgery. I was overwhelmed. The doctor left the room to give me some time to consider.

    A new doctor came in, Dr. Melissa Gorman. Her face told me everything I needed to know about her: stern, kind, no bullshit. She looked me straight in the eye and said she wanted to talk to me about my right foot.

    There was an injury they missed in Norway, she said. A Lisfranc fracture. My mind was blank, as I’m sure was my face. I’d never heard of it. She took a deep breath and said, “Hillary, this is a foot-changing injury.”

    The Lisfranc is a ligament bridging the arch of the foot. It’s a major ligament that contributes to the integrity of the foot, forming the arch, which is essential for standing, walking, and running. Lisfranc fractures are common in football, where players running at full speed are impacted from the side. Athletes who have surgery don’t necessarily make a full recovery. She recommended—insisted—on surgery.

    Time was crucial. It had already been two weeks since the rupture.

    She told me it was unlikely I’d ever compete again.

    All the feeling drained from my body.

    The hand doctor came back into the room. He restated his diagnosis, impatiently waiting for my approval. I told him to do the surgery. “Good choice,” he said as he nodded to his assistant to confirm the surgery date—Thursday. Then he exited the room and I looked to Dr. Gorman again. I knew I had no choice. My foot wasn’t going to heal without the surgery, and if I ever wanted to get back to running, I at least had to try. I nodded to her, and we booked that surgery for the next day, Wednesday.

    That night I couldn’t eat. I couldn’t speak. All I could do was stare, cry, hope—pray— that everything was going to be OK. I hardly slept. The few minutes of precious sleep I got were interrupted when I jolted awake with the dream of falling off that cliff in Norway. Tears came fast as, scared yet again, I relived the experience, the feeling of falling. Then I cried because I was thankful I was alive. And then the tears of fear came. Fearful of what was to come. My surgery, my recovery. Would I ever run again? I didn’t know. The tears kept coming. The fear of the unknown was all-consuming.

    My phone rang at 5:14 a.m. As I peeled my face off the damp pillow to look at my phone, I didn’t recognize the number, but I answered it anyway.

    “Hello,” I said, tears already streaming down my face. The voice on the other end belong to Dave Mackey. A tremendous athlete, Dave was someone I looked up to, who had also suffered from a terrible accident.

    Dave had fallen fifteen to twenty feet off Bear Peak, a summit I had run up often in my hometown of Boulder. But Dave’s leg had been trapped under a rock, and after a year of recovery and rehab, he decided to amputate it. His story was incredible, his will was insatiable, and he was calling me the morning of my surgery to offer his encouragement and support.

    “Hi Hillary, it’s Dave. How are you doing?”

    “Not good,” I sputtered out, simultaneously laughing and crying.

    “That’s understandable,” he said, chuckling as well. “I remember how scared I was before my surgery. I was a complete wreck! But these doctors know what they are doing, and they will do their best to take care of you. You’ll be OK.” Then he added, laughing, “Plus, they give you the good drugs, so you won’t remember much of anything after that! Waiting is the worst part.” Smiling a bit through the tears, I thanked Dave for calling. He wished me well and offered his support as we hung up.

    Dave’s unexpected pep talk gave me a little courage to face the day, and I started telling myself that I would be OK. That I would figure it out. I had the support of my family and my running community, and with that reassurance I started to foster belief in myself. I needed it for that first surgery. I prayed my doctor was ready and sharp and wouldn’t screw up my foot with the screws she was putting in.

    By 7 a.m. I was being prepped for surgery. Everything moved so fast. Nurses assessed the locations of all my injuries and breaks. They marked me up and told me they would remove my stitches while I was under anesthesia. My body looked like a coloring book that a child had gotten hold of: multi-colored marks all over, doctors’ initials, and scribbled notes to make sure they operated on the correct foot (the right one).

    I decided to get a nerve block for the pain. I watched as the anesthesiologist used an ultrasound to locate my peroneal nerve and stuck a needle in my leg. Within seconds, I could no longer feel my foot. A familiar face arrived: my surgeon, Dr. Gorman.

    “Are you ready?” she asked.

    Tears welling up in my eyes, I nodded. Her eye contact lingered, as if to tell me she had me now. It was her turn to do her job, and I could trust her. They wheeled me into the operating room. I gazed upward, blinking into the florescent lights as the world faded away.

    The surgery lasted a couple of hours. It was late afternoon when I woke up from anesthesia. My eyes opened slowly. I was still in the hospital. Still in my hospital gown, with an IV in my arm. My mother, who had been sitting next to me, approached the bed to stroke my hair. My eyes were heavy with sleep, my body weighed down by the painkillers. Warm yet fuzzy, my senses were dulled. The doctor came in to tell us everything went according to plan.

    My mother looked at me with tears in her eyes. “It’s time to go home,” she said as she kissed me on my forehead.

    But it wasn’t over yet. Tomorrow we’d go to another hospital for another set of surgeries. I closed my eyes wearily.

    Back at my sister’s house that evening, I was wheeled to the dinner table—a now-familiar routine. I hadn’t eaten all day. And I wasn’t hungry either. But I tried to eat—it was my only chance until the fasting period for the next day’s surgery. Carefully, I placed my fork in my broken right hand and began strategically shoveling food into my mouth, instead of onto the floor. But as I ate, that pit in my stomach was still there. Food did nothing to fill it.

    I was exhausted from the day’s events, the emotional stress and trauma of the operation. But I couldn’t sleep. Again, I just lay there. Restless, I texted Dave Mackey. Told him the first surgery went well and that I was preparing for two more the next day, on my wrists. I was afraid, unsure, and overwhelmed by the thought of another operation. Dave offered his support, and sometime around 2 a.m. I dozed off.

    Day two was the same routine, with teams of doctors and nurses and anesthesiologists swarming around me, marking me up, and asking me questions. But I didn’t cry. This time, I was quiet. Numb. I wanted it all to be over. As I drifted off, my hand surgeon gave me a warm smile and reassuring nod.

    Waking up on the second day of surgery was different. A nerve block hadn’t been possible for this procedure, so I woke with a dull ache that overpowered the painkillers. That faint ache grew into deep pain as I become more lucid after the surgery, and it persisted throughout the night. No amount of painkillers could touch the pain. Whimpering, I cried myself to sleep out of pure exhaustion, only to awaken within an hour, my arms throbbing, as if someone held a tuning fork to my wrist, the vibrations rippling the fresh hardware inside. I counted down the minutes until I could take another painkiller. Time seemed to move in reverse.

    I had hit rock bottom. I was defeated. Completely broken and rebroken. This was my reality. I could hardly do anything for myself. Helpless and hopeless, I faced complete and utter dependency. But in that moment, I knew I had a choice: give up or fight.

    I could accept my fate and lie idly by, passing the time waiting for my body to heal—hoping that it would. This was the easier choice, the less painful one. The alternative was to question the impossible and challenge what the doctors thought was possible—challenge what even I thought was possible.

    Every day was a humbling new experience, and I never knew what to expect. Some days were excruciating. I felt trapped by the slow progress, the constant pain, the loss of identity and motivation, and the doubts about my future. I had no idea where my life was heading, or if I would overcome these injuries that threatened to consume my joy and the very essence of who I was. Every day I asked myself these questions, and every day I knew I had to face them. I knew I had to try.

  • What Runners Need To Know About Intuitive Eating
    18 June 2021

    Intuitive Eating is trending right now. If you are unsure of what this way of eating is all about, it essentially encompasses getting back to how we innately learned to eat (connecting the mind and body) before there were any rules around our food and food choices. The founders, dietitians Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch, define intuitive eating as “a self-care eating framework, which integrates instinct, emotion, and rational thought.”

    What Are the Benefits of Intuitive Eating?

    While Intuitive Eating may seem like a recent concept, it has been around since 1995. And it is a model that has been validated by sufficient research. In fact, over 90 studies to date (this number is steadily increasing as people want to study it more) have been published on intuitive eating and its 10 principles. Much of this research links intuitive eating to positive benefits, such as greater life satisfaction, positive emotional functioning, greater body appreciation and satisfaction, and a greater motivation to exercise when focus is on enjoyment rather than guilt. Heath measures can improve, too, as research points to improved blood pressure, blood lipids and dietary intake.

    RELATED: The Importance Of Eating Enough Food

    Intuitive eating is also inversely associated with disordered eating traits and habits, something that has become relevant in the running community. A 2016 study funded by the National Collegiate Athletic Association Sport Science Institute found that intuitive eating practices among retired female athletes helped them to feel liberated in their eating, and for some, alleviated disordered eating practices they previously experienced.

    In principle, intuitive eating challenges these rigid principles and all-or-nothing thinking. It is not a diet or food plan, and there is no counting calories, carbs, points or macros involved. Instead, intuitive eating takes away the rules that we see as “normal,” since we have been following them for so long. It is a journey of self-discovery, helping you learn to connect the needs of your body and mind and eat for pleasure and enjoyment (and health, too).

    All of this may sound interesting and enticing, but how does it relate to you as a runner?

    Intuitive eating and sports nutrition can absolutely work together if there is a fundamental understanding of the two. Here are some key points for understanding how the principles of intuitive eating can apply to running situations.

    RELATED: Low Energy Availability Can Hurt The Endocrine System And Overall Health

    Feel What Hunger Feels Like

    A large framework of intuitive eating is to learn to honor and acknowledge your hunger and fullness. While this may sound fundamental in theory, if you’ve been following subjective rules for long periods of times, hunger cues may be blunted or non-existent. Hunger can manifest in ways other than a growling stomach. For example, learning to link other symptoms, such as headaches, fatigue, lack of concentration, and thinking about food to hunger can be a powerful reminder to eat.

    Runners and endurance athletes need to eat more than the regular population (including more carbohydrates and protein), so learning to tune in to these hunger signals from the body can be an important part of adequate fueling for training.

    However, You May Also Need to Eat When You’re Not Hungry

    Learning to tune in to your hunger and fullness are big parts of intuitive eating, but they aren’t the only parts. Only eating when you are hungry and stopping when you feel full can quickly turn into the hunger-fullness diet.

    Intuitive eating acknowledges that there may be instances where we need to eat when we don’t feel hungry, such as after a hard workout or long run. It is quite normal for appetite to be blunted when adrenaline and hormones are high post workout, however, that is not an instance where “listening to our bodies” best serves us.

    The window after a run or workout is important for recovery and muscle replenishment to fuel future workouts. This is the rational part of intuitive eating that requires us to override body knowledge, sometimes. In these instances, sipping on a smoothie or protein shake, or even eating something small, is better than nothing and may jumpstart appetite. Even if your body doesn’t “feel” hungry, your mind logically knows that you need to refuel after a workout to stay adequately nourished, keep energy stable, prevent blood sugar dips and keep glycogen replenished for future activity.

    RELATED: Stop Making These Nutrition Mistakes

    Photo: Getty ImagesRespect Your Body

    There is currently more awareness on topics of body image in athletes and how negative body image in the sport is tied to eating disorders and disordered eating. Rather than encouraging comparison or trying to fit into a “standard mold,” intuitive eating takes your genetics and body diversity into account.

    We’re not all meant to look the same, and we won’t all be the same shape, height or weight. Just as there are inherent differences in a mastiff and a chihuahua, our body size and shape will vary too. Respect your body for what it can do for you. Can your strong legs enable a push in the final leg of a 5k? Can the extra fat in your midsection help store extra energy to keep you fueled for the longer parts of a marathon?

    The important takeaway from this principle is that your worth is not tied to your size, and your size is not directly linked to performance.

    Move to Feel the Difference

    There is likely something about running that has drawn us into the repetitive motion of the sport – whether it’s exploring new forms of nature on foot, clearing the mind, or the soothing sound of sneakers hitting the pavement. Whatever it is, being clear on your reasons for running can be a grounding exercise in and of itself.

    Focus on how it feels to run long or hard, rather than how many calories you’re burning or what foods you get to eat upon finishing.

    How do you feel after a run – Energized? Strong? Empowered? Being clear on the benefits outside of size and weight can make running feel more attainable and enjoyable.

    Photo: Getty ImagesGentle Nutrition (Self Care)

    Gentle nutrition is saved for the last principle of intuitive eating because it is important to have the foundation of body-mind knowledge before applying this principle of incorporating nutrition knowledge.

    Adequately fueling your body is an act of self-care. Eating foods you like and enjoy is also an act of self-care. There can be a flexible balance between giving yourself permission to enjoy the foods you like and eating nutrient-dense foods to support your training, as well as eating the right foods in and around your training.

    For example, while you may really enjoy donuts, you know that they generally leave you feeling sluggish and hungry 30 minutes later. This is a good piece of cerebral knowledge to have. While you don’t have to give donuts up completely, you can use rational thinking drawing on previous experiences to substitute them with a higher-protein option to keep you fuller for longer or pair a donut with Greek yogurt for more satiety.

    You could also choose to eat the donut after your workout, rather than before, to limit feeling sluggish or uncomfortable on your run. Neither of these instances view the donut as “bad” or feel the need to restrict it. Instead, acknowledge that the donut is just a food (food is inherently neutral, not good or bad) and can still fit into your lifestyle.

    The Bottom Line

    In short, intuitive eating is absolutely possible for anyone and everyone, including runners and athletes. Since it combines and connects body and mind knowledge, understanding the basic components of sports nutrition can help guide some of your innate signals to lead to a non-stressful and enjoyable experience with food.

    Attempting to incorporate these principles on your own can be challenging and intimidating, but there are several Registered Dietitians who specialize in this work to help you improve your relationship with food, and performance! Another great resource for the intersection of sports nutrition and intuitive eating is The Runner’s Guide to Intuitive Eating.

    Resources

    Carolyn R. Plateau, Trent A. Petrie & Anthony Papathomas (2017) Learning to eat again: Intuitive eating practices among retired female collegiate athletes, Eating Disorders, 25:1, 92-98, DOI: 10.1080/10640266.2016.1219185

    Van Dyke N, Drinkwater E. Relationships between intuitive eating and health indicators: literature review. PublHealth Nutr.2014;17:1757-1766.

  • Unfinished Business
    18 June 2021

    The post Unfinished Business appeared first on iRunFar.

    I sit in my bus. The sounds of Tom Rosenthal play softly from my phone while a gentle rain patters on the roof. I haven’t officially started life in the bus yet, but I can tell already that rainy nights will likely be a favorite. There is just something about that sound that gets me every time.

    I am slated to begin living in my short bus very soon. Hopefully by the time you read this essay, I will no longer be talking about it and actually doing it. I say hopefully because I have blown right by every departure goal that I have set. Perhaps I am just really bad at estimating a timeline, but it seems as though every project takes 10 times longer than expected, and when it’s done, another one always appears. At this point if feels like I just need to rip the Band-Aid off and leave. Otherwise I will forever find myself in the driveway trying to finish up “one more project.”

    It makes me think of the house in which I grew up. The brick Cape Cod-style house with blue shutters and a long stone driveway that my sisters and I were raised in stood for 30 or so years with an unfinished fireplace. My dad and grandfather built the house, and they did an excellent job, but for some reason there was one corner of the brick hearth that was left unfinished. It may have had something to do with my mom going into labor and my dad needing to drop what he was doing and head to the hospital. Whatever the reason, it wasn’t until about 32 years after the house had been erected that Dad finally got around to laying the final brick.

    As I look ahead to launching my bus, there is a part of me that wants to wait until it is completely finished. At the same time, there is another part of me that is anxious to get going, a side that says I can leave an unfinished corner or two and finish as I go. The perfectionist in me says that’s a dangerous game, that I could easily end up years down the road with an unfinished hearth.

    Running can sometimes feel the same way. How many times have you committed to running a race only to find yourself wanting to back out because you didn’t feel ready? Or maybe you felt ready, but conditions didn’t seem ideal. At times these hesitations are valid and should be heeded. Other times, however, they are a stumbling block.

    It’s like the fireplace. How silly would it have been for my parents to have delayed moving into their new home just because the fireplace was missing a brick or two? Sure, it may have been unfinished, but the house was still a home, and in the midst of the imperfection, my parents raised a family. My memories of growing up are not tainted by missing pieces. If anything, they are enhanced by them. The unfinished corner was a running joke in the family, a constant source of laughter for all those who knew the story.

    We are now roughly halfway through 2021, and many of you may feel as though you have come out of the past year with a lot of scattered pieces. Perhaps your fitness is not where you want it to be and your goals feel unclear. Or maybe your fitness is great, but the thought of toeing a start line feels foreign and scary. Whatever it may be, remember that the way forward is rarely perfect. None of us runs a perfect trail.

    There will almost always be a niggle, a rock, or a root, something that gives us reason to pause. In my years of racing, if I had bowed out every time I felt intimidated or uncertain, I would have sat out of a lot of races and missed a lot of opportunities. In fact, some of my best races have been the ones for which I wasn’t sure I was ready. It’s crazy to think about what I would have missed out on had I kept the bus parked in the driveway.

    Looking ahead, I am excited about all that awaits. There are so many places to explore and people to see. Some places are familiar, as they are home to friends, mountains, and trails that I know well. Others are more foreign, places I’ve been to only briefly or not at all. As I journey into what is to come, it is important to remember that some of life’s greatest moments occur amidst imperfection.

    As we explore, run, and maybe even race this summer, let’s not let the need to be perfect rob us of what we love to do. We don’t need a finished hearth. Life and running are just about laying some bricks.

    Call for Comments

    • Do you ever find that perfection or the desire to complete something get in the way of even starting?
    • Can you think of an unfinished object or experience that enhanced your life anyway?

    All photos: Zach Miller

    Unfinished Business by Zach Miller.

  • Reseña: Saucony Triumph 19 (Spanish)
    17 June 2021

    Article by Beto Hughes

    Saucony Triumph 19 ($150 USD)

    Regresa con menor peso, mismo maximo acolchonamiento y retorno de energía!!!

    Tester: Beto Hughes

    Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico 31 años, Estatura 176cm, Peso 89kg

    Comencé a correr en 2016 y a entrenar para bajar de peso, solía pesar 135 kg y entre correr y Crossfit comenzó mi amor por la vida saludable y Fitness, y claro por correr, ahora estoy enfocado en pronto calificar para el Boston Marathon. Kilometraje por semana: 100 a 125 km en Asfalto.

    Distancia Favorita: Maratón y Medio Maratón. También el Ultra Marathon.Maraton PR 3:22, Medio Maraton PR 1:31, 10k PR 41:52 5k PR 20:05

    Me puedes seguir en Instagram @betohughes  https://www.instagram.com/betohughes/

    Pros:

    • Mejor ajuste del medio pie.

    • Upper muy transpirable y cómodo desde el talon hasta la punta del pie.

    • Alta calidad de construcción en el upper y muy cómodo sin comprometer el rendimiento.

    • Lengüeta muy acolchonada zero presión en medio pie, Cintas acolchonadas que se mantienen siempre ajustadas.

    • Perdió casi 1 oz de peso.

    • El PWRRUN+ es muy suave y firme ala ves lo que lo hace responsivo.

    • Suave y cómodo para largas distancias y con excelente rebote y  retorno de energía.

    Cons:

    • Puede ser algo pesado para el gusto de algunos.

    • Es suave y tiene algo de firmesa lo cual puede no ser tan como para los que les agrade los tenis super suaves.

    CLICK to Read more »

Canadian Running blogs

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20 June 2021

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20 June 2021

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  • Unexpected discoveries through ultrarunning - Bartlesville, Oklahoma
    19 June 2021

    One of the best aspects of my ultrarunning destinations trips is the unexpected discoveries that I find along the way. On my trip to Oklahoma for the Flower Moon trail marathon, I didn’t expect to visit a world famous skyscraper, a pop-culture phenomenon, nor learn about the birth of the FBI.

    I began my trip landing in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I picked Tulsa as my start since it is about an hour south of Bartlesville, Oklahoma where I’d found a unique hotel on AirBnb that is just 20 minutes from the Osage Hills State Park where the Flower Moon trail runs are held. The very first thing I wanted to explore after landing was sites along Route 66. Known for kitschy displays and for keeping a historic vibe I was hoping to find a classic diner. I found just what I was looking for at the Tally’s Good Food Cafe, known for the best chicken fried steak sandwich in Oklahoma. This dish hasn’t ever been my favorite, but when in Rome, eat what they feature on the menu. While good, it’s still not something I prefer.

    I headed north for the 1 hour drive to Bartlesville to get to my hotel, The Hotel Phillips. The hotel is a stately building on the edge of downtown Bartlesville. What I learned pretty fast is that Bartlesville is where Phillips Petroleum was founded, and the town is dominated by the company. You can even visit the site of the first commercial oil well in Oklahoma. Many of the high-rise buildings, as well as a large research facility on the edge of town, are all owned by Phillips. One building that is not owned by Philips, though, is the Price Tower. What makes this building unique is that it is the only Frank Lloyd Wright skyscraper in the world. It’s exceptionally unique looking because of its green patina from the copper cladding on the outside to the oddly shaped, and somewhat small, elevators. They have a very nice restaurant and bar at the top, including a terrace, that provides great views of the city and surrounding area. It was here while having a drink that I learned about one of the main reasons people come to stay in Bartlesville outside of Phillips Petroleum business.

    Bartlesville is about a one hour drive from Pawhuska, Oklahoma. Pawhuska is home to the Pioneer Woman who is a star on the Food Network. She’s developed a large following on TV, but also has a restaurant in Pawhuska, The Mercantile, that is very popular (as evidenced by the nearly 5000 reviews on Google). I got there extra early to avoid any lines, and while there I also saw crews filming a movie, The Killers of the Flower Moon. They based the movie on the book of the same name, Killers of the Flower Moon, which is about a series of murders in the area. The trial was held at the Osage County Courthouse that sits high upon a hill overlooking the town. It is an imposing sight. The murders, as well as the subsequent investigations, were an integral part in the founding and development of the FBI.

    Much of the surrounding area is made up of Indian reservations and large swaths of undisturbed prairie land. I traveled out to the Tallgrass Prairie Reserve so I could hike the prairie and see a herd of buffalo. At the reserve there are a couple of short trails from the visitor center that let you walk into the prairie area and appreciate the quiet. It’s very remote, with much of the drive on dirt roads through the reserve.

    The run itself is held in the Osage County State Park. This area is made up of relatively dense woods, rolling hills and a river. For the marathon, the run does two loops of the 13 mile course. The high point is the view of the falls on the river, but the course is also very runnable on soft single track through the forests. The organization, aid stations, and volunteers were all top-notch! Despite what turned out to be a hot day and not feeling my best for a portion of the race, I won my age group!

    Oklahoma makes a great ultrarunning destination because of the many miles of trails in state parks such as Osage and the large undisturbed areas of prairie land. I ended my trip by touring a preserved bridge from the old Route 66. It’s fun to imagine all the travelers that have come before us when looking at the preserved stretch of road. Come to Oklahoma to revisit the past, but also make your own memories with an ultrarunning destination trip of your own.

    Tracks

    Start and End: Osage Hills State Park
    Distance:
    26 miles (44km)
    Elevation: 2322 feet (700m)

    Gallery











  • Mike Ambrose: From an Ultrarunning Dream to Designing the Salomon Ultra Glide Trail Shoe
    18 June 2021

    The post Mike Ambrose: From an Ultrarunning Dream to Designing the Salomon Ultra Glide Trail Shoe appeared first on iRunFar.

    When Mike Ambrose started working for Vertical Runner, a running store in Breckenridge, Colorado in 2014, he was excited to have landed his ideal job. Having moved to Colorado from the U.S. East Coast with a group of friends, living in the mountains with trails at his doorstep, and working a job that allowed him to share his love of trail running with others, it was living the dream. A simple life, surrounded by nature, and with Mount Royal at the edge of the Tenmile Range as his backyard run, it was the perfect place to be a young ultrarunner. He lived on the cheap, found jobs that supported his needs, and embraced a simple, trail running-focused lifestyle.

    If you’d told him at the time that in 2021, he would be a lead product line manager for Salomon, living in Annecy, France, he probably wouldn’t have believed you. It seemed unlikely that a psychology college graduate who started running 5ks around his neighborhood for exercise would find himself creating some of the most technologically advanced shoes on the market halfway across the world.

    The new Salomon Ultra Glide trail running shoe is the culmination of Mike’s years of experience in various aspects of the sport, as a runner, salesperson, technical representative, marketing specialist, and finally, as Salomon’s lead product line manager for trail running. But in the end, it’s also a result of a fateful click on an internet video while online shopping for something completely unrelated.

    Mike Ambrose and the Salomon Ultra Guide trail running shoe. Photo courtesy of Mike Ambrose.

    Mike wasn’t born into the outdoor mountain lifestyle. “I didn’t see a mountain in person until I was 19 or 20 years old,” he says. “I grew up in suburban New Jersey. We did vacations at Disney World when we were lucky. I worked in a mall. I wasn’t this connected to nature as a kid or anything. I played baseball and basketball, but I never really ran. Running was punishment.”

    Like many people who’ve found their passion in ultrarunning, Mike started running just to stay in shape. Running a 10k around his Deptford neighborhood in 2008 was monumental. From there, things progressed quickly. He ran his first marathon in 2010, and in a moment of serendipity, came upon a trail running video of ultrarunning superstar Krissy Moehl on the Patagonia website while looking for a new wetsuit. Immediately interested, he dove into whatever he could find on the sport of running in the mountains, learning of Dean Karnazes, Scott Jurek, and Anton Krupicka.

    Intrigued by the idea of trail running, he signed up to run the JFK 50 Mile with a friend. “I just wanted to go on an adventure and get my feet wet and try it. I thought it would be a challenge, and just be a journey.”

    He was hooked. He ran his first 100-mile race, the Umstead 100 Mile, the next year, and with a steady diet of Salomon TV episodes as fuel and inspiration, he fell in love with the brand and hatched a plan to head west. “I saw what Colorado trail runners were doing. I just felt like I had to do it. It just seemed like the best thing in the world, to live this life that was simple and based around just being in the mountains all day.” It was an exciting time in ultrarunning in the U.S., and Mike was seeing it all for the first time. He watched as Anton Krupicka shaved down his shoes for the Western States 100 and as Kilian Jornet emerged as a running phenom.

    Mike (left) running the 2019 Transalpine Run with friend and teammate Josh Korn. Photo: Klaus Fengler

    In 2012, a train from Penn Station in Pennsylvania to Denver, Colorado delivered Mike and two friends to the base of the Rockies. Hitchhiking and walking around Colorado that summer, he immediately fell in love with the mountains. He invited Stephanie Lefferts, his then girlfriend and now wife, out to meet them, and they spent a few weeks driving around the West. The draw of Summit County was strong, and after finding an affordable place to live in Frisco, they got jobs and decided to stay.

    It wasn’t long before he moved over the pass to Leadville, finding work at the City on a Hill coffee shop and becoming fully immersed in the running culture of the small mountain town. He became friends with Bill Dooper, ultrarunning’s super fan who passed away in 2018, and built a strong community of people around himself. Listening to Mike talk about Leadville, his love for the town and the surrounding mountains is apparent.

    “I remember a few early shifts, 5:00 a.m., where we’d just grab our puffy jackets and go stand outside and watch the alpenglow on the mountains. I always said it’s really great to live somewhere where you just want to go outside and take a picture of what you see every day.” And the trails were endless. “You’ve got the Boulevard, you’ve got Turquoise Lake, you’re a short drive from Half Moon Trailhead and the Colorado Trail, and obviously Mounts Elbert and Massive are there.”

    Mike and his wife Stephanie eating a tart mid-run in Europe. Photo: Giles Ruck

    Slinging coffee, running, racing, and living at 10,000 feet in the shadow of Colorado’s tallest mountains all fit Mike well. With his growing knowledge of trails in the area and reputation as a runner, he helped the organizers of the Ultra Race of Champions design a race route from Breckenridge to Vail. Through this, he became friends with the then owner of Vertical Runner in Breckenridge and was offered a job. He jumped on the opportunity. “At the time, I was like, it doesn’t really get any better than this.”

    Still a Salomon fan, both of their shoes and company as a whole, he relished being able to sell their products and get others out on the trails, his passion for the sport contagious. When a job opened as a tech rep for Salomon in New England, he was quick to apply. He had firsthand knowledge of how shoes performed through his own running and racing, and now he’d seen the sales aspect of the running industry as well. Plus, he still loved the Salomon videos that had helped him get into trail running in the first place.

    While his stay in Colorado was short, it’s obvious he packed a lot into that time. “We lived a lifetime in those three years. We were 25-year-old kids living in a beautiful place and had jobs that supported it.” He raced ultras often, finishing the Leadville Trail 100 Mile twice during his time there, but it was the San Juan Solstice 50 Mile that left the deepest impression. He’d driven down to the start with friends, including Bill Dooper, camped on someone’s lawn, and woken up at 3:30 a.m. to freezing temperatures to run. While he raced well, it was clearly the people who made the race special.

    “[Bill] Dooper was a half mile from the finish line and walks out, doing a little walk, and that was a huge part of it. Having a good day, and having a good day for Bill. To me, that’s the high point of anything I’ve ever done in running. Afterward, we took Bill for ice-cream sodas and milkshakes. He said, ‘I’ve never had a $5 milkshake before, let alone two in a day!’”

    Bill Dooper cheering Mike as he finished the San Juan Solstice 50 Mile. Photo: Stephanie Lefferts

    The move to Boston, Massachusetts to work for Salomon in 2015 was another dream come true. He spent a year there, learning everything he could, and when a marketing specialist job for Salomon opened up in Ogden, Utah at Salomon’s U.S. headquarters, it was a natural progression. The same way Mike’s passion for the sport and gear had him moving from running 10ks around the neighborhood to 100-mile races in a relatively short period of time, it now had him taking on increasing responsibility at Salomon. Surrounded by a solid team, he found success at the company that he’d admired since he first started running.

    When the global headquarters of Salomon in France wanted to bring a distinctly North American perspective to their product design, Mike was an obvious choice for their new product line manager for trail running. Trails in the U.S. are different than those in Europe, as are the markets for shoes. Few brands have been successful in both places.

    After years of running and racing in Salomon shoes, selling them, and talking to retailers and other runners about them, he now had the opportunity to design them. He has a simple goal for all of the shoes that he designs. “I want someone, every time they put on a pair of Salomons, to feel like they can fly, that they can do anything.”

    Mike designed the new Ultra Glide trail running shoe to do exactly that. Mike wanted a shoe that would fill out the Salomon line with a model that is both high performance and comfortable for ultramarathon distances. He wanted something for the runners who found other shoes too narrow, or too firm, or too overbuilt. He wanted to design a shoe that anyone could love running in.

    The Salomon Ultra Glide. Photo: iRunFar

    Under Mike’s watchful eye, Salomon created a shoe that is soft, responsive, light, and stable. Taking a three-out-of-three approach, they aimed for a shoe that would fit well by striking a compromise between width and foothold, that would be soft without being mushy, and that would have good grip. The result is a performance-oriented 274-gram shoe for a U.S. men’s size 9 with the cushion to provide comfort over long distances.

    For a Salomon shoe, the stack height is tall, with 38 millimeters at the heel and 32mm at the toe, making a 6mm heel-to-toe drop. The ultra-soft Energy Surge midsole is paired with a modern rocker design for a smooth and responsive feel. Extra foam in the forefoot as well as Salomon’s version of a rock plate, Profeel Film, provides additional protection against rocks without adding excessive stiffness.

    Built on a road running last, the Ultra Glide is a higher volume shoe than many other trail offerings from Salomon, but thanks to the SensiFit wings and the Quicklace system, it still fits snugly to handle technical terrain. With 4mm lugs and a full Contagrip MA outsole, it’s ready for anything. The Ultra Glide will be available for order on August 1, 2021.

    It’s clear from talking to Mike that he’s proud of the end result. “Our athletes love it, runners love it, everyone loves it.”

    Mike’s love of running is apparent in his approach to design. “You know that feeling when you feel like you can go anywhere, you feel like you can do anything? That’s the best feeling in the world. I think that’s what I aspire for all trail runners to do and feel.” From watching videos of Krissy Moehl to designing the Salomon Ultra Glide, the passion for running and the places two feet and a pair of shoes can take you has been a constant. And in talking to Mike, you get the impression that his dedication to the sport is as strong as ever.

    [Editor’s Note: This article is sponsored by Salomon. Learn more about the men’s version and women’s version of the Salomon Ultra Glide trail running shoe.]

    Mike running in his current home of Annecy, France. Photo: Bryson White

    Mike Ambrose: From an Ultrarunning Dream to Designing the Salomon Ultra Glide Trail Shoe by Sponsored Post.

  • Unfinished Business
    18 June 2021

    The post Unfinished Business appeared first on iRunFar.

    I sit in my bus. The sounds of Tom Rosenthal play softly from my phone while a gentle rain patters on the roof. I haven’t officially started life in the bus yet, but I can tell already that rainy nights will likely be a favorite. There is just something about that sound that gets me every time.

    I am slated to begin living in my short bus very soon. Hopefully by the time you read this essay, I will no longer be talking about it and actually doing it. I say hopefully because I have blown right by every departure goal that I have set. Perhaps I am just really bad at estimating a timeline, but it seems as though every project takes 10 times longer than expected, and when it’s done, another one always appears. At this point if feels like I just need to rip the Band-Aid off and leave. Otherwise I will forever find myself in the driveway trying to finish up “one more project.”

    It makes me think of the house in which I grew up. The brick Cape Cod-style house with blue shutters and a long stone driveway that my sisters and I were raised in stood for 30 or so years with an unfinished fireplace. My dad and grandfather built the house, and they did an excellent job, but for some reason there was one corner of the brick hearth that was left unfinished. It may have had something to do with my mom going into labor and my dad needing to drop what he was doing and head to the hospital. Whatever the reason, it wasn’t until about 32 years after the house had been erected that Dad finally got around to laying the final brick.

    As I look ahead to launching my bus, there is a part of me that wants to wait until it is completely finished. At the same time, there is another part of me that is anxious to get going, a side that says I can leave an unfinished corner or two and finish as I go. The perfectionist in me says that’s a dangerous game, that I could easily end up years down the road with an unfinished hearth.

    Running can sometimes feel the same way. How many times have you committed to running a race only to find yourself wanting to back out because you didn’t feel ready? Or maybe you felt ready, but conditions didn’t seem ideal. At times these hesitations are valid and should be heeded. Other times, however, they are a stumbling block.

    It’s like the fireplace. How silly would it have been for my parents to have delayed moving into their new home just because the fireplace was missing a brick or two? Sure, it may have been unfinished, but the house was still a home, and in the midst of the imperfection, my parents raised a family. My memories of growing up are not tainted by missing pieces. If anything, they are enhanced by them. The unfinished corner was a running joke in the family, a constant source of laughter for all those who knew the story.

    We are now roughly halfway through 2021, and many of you may feel as though you have come out of the past year with a lot of scattered pieces. Perhaps your fitness is not where you want it to be and your goals feel unclear. Or maybe your fitness is great, but the thought of toeing a start line feels foreign and scary. Whatever it may be, remember that the way forward is rarely perfect. None of us runs a perfect trail.

    There will almost always be a niggle, a rock, or a root, something that gives us reason to pause. In my years of racing, if I had bowed out every time I felt intimidated or uncertain, I would have sat out of a lot of races and missed a lot of opportunities. In fact, some of my best races have been the ones for which I wasn’t sure I was ready. It’s crazy to think about what I would have missed out on had I kept the bus parked in the driveway.

    Looking ahead, I am excited about all that awaits. There are so many places to explore and people to see. Some places are familiar, as they are home to friends, mountains, and trails that I know well. Others are more foreign, places I’ve been to only briefly or not at all. As I journey into what is to come, it is important to remember that some of life’s greatest moments occur amidst imperfection.

    As we explore, run, and maybe even race this summer, let’s not let the need to be perfect rob us of what we love to do. We don’t need a finished hearth. Life and running are just about laying some bricks.

    Call for Comments

    • Do you ever find that perfection or the desire to complete something get in the way of even starting?
    • Can you think of an unfinished object or experience that enhanced your life anyway?

    All photos: Zach Miller

    Unfinished Business by Zach Miller.

  • Trail Marathons – 5 Tips For Training & Reaching the Finish Line
    17 June 2021

    By Ultimate Direction ambassador, Nadia Ruiz. Nadia is a personal coach, the the youngest Latina to finish 100 trail marathons, and has completed over 500 races around the globe.

    Let’s face it – doing anything for the first time is a daunting task, especially taking on your first trail marathon. “How do I prepare, how do I ensure success, how do I overcome setbacks?” Mentors and coaches can provide a great resource to explore new paths, challenges, and careers. Therefore, I would like to share with you the 5 top tips I wish I knew before I began training for my first trail marathon to help you prepare and prevent injury.

    1. Write down your goal and WHY

    Setting a new goal is the first step. The next is reflecting within yourself to explore WHY is that your goal and why is it important to you. This is the most crucial aspect to pursing new goals because we all inevitably face setbacks, challenges, and days where we truly don’t want to get out of bed or the door. The “why” you come up with will be the force pulling you to your goal. Write it down and share it with individuals in your life that mean the most and will keep you accountable.

    2. Choose a trail marathon race that makes you excited and/or scared

    As human beings, we love things that give us thrills or create memorable experience. This is why getting married, having your first child, buying your first home mean so much, because it took so much to get there. Reaching your first trail marathon, trail race, or ultra means overcoming many obstacles that made you excited and scared at the same time. When we are scared with positive excitement, we tend to do what it takes to prepare and this encourages us to revisit our “why”. Find that place or race that makes your heart skip a beat.

    3. Create a training plan that’s right for YOU

    There are many ways to train for different races, distances, and challenges. The right coach can help create a plan for you. Let go of comparing how you are training or progressing in comparison to those online or social profiles of athletes that do it professionally. Your body and your lifestyle is unique to you; therefore, your training plan and approach is unique to you. Review your training history, your performance capability, and how much time you are willing to allocate to train for the goals you set for yourself. A qualified and experienced coach can do this for you, or with time, you can do it for yourself through trial and error to see what works for you. Hire a coach if you think it is the best fit for you.

    4. Train specifically for your trail marathon race

    Trail running throws in a few new challenges over road running: you are not only tackling the distance, speed, and weather, but also the terrain, altitude, and elevation gain. Within your training plan, ensure you are aiming to recreate your race conditions as much as possible within your training. If you know it will be hot, train in heat. If you know you will race at altitude, train higher up. If you you know you will race on technical terrain, get to the rockiest trails you can find. Racing is a celebration of our training. We all suffer on race day—how much we prepare and suffer in training determines how we allocate that suffering, whether it be more in our training or on our race day. We make the choice.

    5. Stay committed

    Any new goal takes commitment. Our biggest ally when tackling a large task is breaking it into smaller steps and aiming to accomplish a little more each day. Getting faster, getting stronger, and going longer are all alluring goals we would love to see ourselves accomplish. Remain committed to your goal, your “why”, accept your lifestyle, acknowledge your strengths / weaknesses, and forgive yourself when there is a day when you can’t get out there. Consistency will be your biggest ally in order to remain committed to the overall picture. Believe in your body, training plan, and above all your mind. It will get you to the start line and the finish line, even if it is in happy tears!

    Nadia’s Top Gear Picks for Trail Marathon Training and Racing Marathon Vest v2

    For lighter, efficient training or racing. When you don’t need to carry so much, yet want the security to carry what you need.

    Fastdraw 500

    The most efficient gear to go in and out of aid stations for refilling. It has enough to carry your phone and/or snack, while you swiftly go from one check point to the next.

    Ventro Windshell

    Extra lightweight, breathable, and water-resistant for a packable piece that is great in all conditions

    More Training Tips from Nadia

    The post Trail Marathons – 5 Tips For Training & Reaching the Finish Line appeared first on The Ultimate Direction Buzz.

  • New Trail Running Apparel Program: Ultimate Direction Signs Elite Athletes
    17 June 2021

    2021 Apparel Athletes Include Amelia Boone, Jonathan Albon, Meredith Edwards and Jason Schlarb, with Joseph Gray for Outerwear

    Ultimate Direction proudly announces its elite athletes who will propel the brand’s spring launch of its new, head-to-toe trail running apparel line. Amelia Boone, Jonathan Albon, Jason Schlarb and Meredith Edwards have joined the overall apparel program, with Joseph Gray specializing in outerwear.

    “We’re excited to have these world-class athletes set in motion Ultimate Direction’s first comprehensive performance apparel line, which we designed for trail running and as a complement to our running and outdoor gear,” commented Ryan Green, Vice President and General Manager of Ultimate Direction.

    The new apparel line will offer pieces for every type of trail runner, from technical jackets designed to withstand the world’s toughest ultra races, to moisture-wicking shorts that will perform during 5K to 100K races.

    Apparel Athlete Highlights

    Amelia Boone

    Amelia Boone – Ultrarunner and obstacle course racer, Boone is dubbed “The Queen of Pain”. She is a four-time world champion and one of the most decorated obstacle racers in history. Over her career she has amassed more than 50 podiums and 30 victories in obstacle racing.

    Jason Schlarb

    Jason Schlarb – Schlarb is a father, coach and one of the most decorated long-distance mountain runners in the world. A few of his accomplishments include winning and setting the second fastest time ever at Hardrock 100 (tied with Kilian Jornet), three wins at Run Rabbit Run 100, and two first-place American finishes at UTMB. He is the first person to ski the Hardrock 100 course.

    Jonathan Albon

    Jonathan Albon – A multiple world champion in trail, sky running and obstacle course racing, Albon has taken gold at the Skyrunner World Series, IAU Trail World Championships, Tougher Mudder Championship, and has multiple wins at the Sky Extreme Series, Spartan World Championship, and OCR World Championship.

    Meredith Edwards

    Meredith Edwards – Edwards is a mountain endurance athlete who specializes in ultra running, ski mountaineering and gravel grinding. Among her running accomplishments are five podium finishes at UTMB, and course records at Tushars 100K and Ultra Trail Mount Siguniang 60K.

    Joseph Gray

    Joseph Gray – Gray is an American world champion runner who competes in trail, mountain and snowshoe races. Among Gray’s numerous podium victories, he is a two-time World Mountain Running Champion, five-time Xterra World Trail Running Champion, and seven-time USA Mountain Running National Champion. He has also been inducted into the Colorado Running Hall of Fame.

    Adam Merry

    Additional athletes joining Ultimate Direction’s expanded trail running and athletic apparel program include Adam Merry, Jacky Hunt-Broersma, Nadia Ruiz, Tara Warren, Kristopher Mendoza, Alyssa Olenick, Ashleigh Thompson, Brandon Yonke, Emma Roca, Gabriel Ortega, Kriste Peoples, Kyle Robidoux, Linda Signal, Madison Hart.

    Ultimate Direction will share more details on the new apparel line when it launches this March.

    Jacky Hunt-BroersmaGabriel Ortega & Nadia Ruiz

    About Ultimate Direction

    Founded in 1985 by outdoor enthusiasts who invented the running hydration pack, Ultimate Direction demanded then – and continues to demand – products that fit and function better than anything else on the market. For 30 years since, UD has changed and redefined the running and outdoor industry through product designs that improve performance, enjoyment and safety for self-propelled adventurers of all levels. Ultimate Direction is a brand of Exxel Outdoors.

    Visit www.ultimatedirection.com

    The post New Trail Running Apparel Program: Ultimate Direction Signs Elite Athletes appeared first on The Ultimate Direction Buzz.

  • Sabrina Verjee sets record for running all 214 Wainwright peaks in under six days
    17 June 2021
    • Cumbrian vet’s 325-mile route takes in 36,000m of ascent
    • 39-year-old slept just a handful of hours a night for record

    The British ultrarunner Sabrina Verjee has shattered the record for completing all of the Lake District’s 214 Wainwright peaks in less than six days – making her the fastest athlete, male or female, to do so by more than six hours.

    The 39-year-old veterinary surgeon from Ambleside finished the 325-mile route in just five days, 23 hours, 49 minutes and 12 seconds, sleeping just a handful of hours a night to keep ahead of the previous best set by Paul Tierney in 2019.

    Related: ‘These races are epic’: why ultrarunning is soaring in popularity

  • Saucony Peregrine 11 Review
    17 June 2021

    The post Saucony Peregrine 11 Review appeared first on iRunFar.

    The Saucony Peregrine 11 ($120) is the latest edition of the company’s classic Peregrine model. In this video review, we look closely at this go-to trail running shoe that works well in a lot of different terrain conditions as well as when running both fast and far.

    Saucony Peregrine 11 Review Transcript

    Hey, welcome to Trail Trials, the video-review section of iRunFar, my name is Travis Liles and in this video we look at the Saucony Peregrine 11 ($120) trail running shoe. Let’s kick off by talking about the specifications here. The Saucony Peregrine 11 in a men’s size 9 comes in at just at 10 ounces. We have a 4-millimeter drop from heel to toe, 27mm at the heel and 23mm at the toe. This shoe is pretty luggy, is moderately cushioned, and has good upper. This is just like a classic trail shoe. Let’s talk about it.

    The Saucony Peregrine 11. All Photos: iRunFar

    Saucony Peregrine 11 Outsole

    Let’s start at the outsole of the Saucony Peregrine 11. As you can see from this side view, it has substantial lugs. They’re not overly crazy lugs like a football cleat or something, but they are angled and toothy, and there are quite a few of them. This shoe excels on soft ground, it excels on wet mud and places where you need grip. The rubber compound is PWRTRAC, and it’s a really good middle tackiness, middle longevity type of rubber compound.

    In some older versions of the Peregrine, I felt like the lugs were maybe built too much for longevity, which meant they were slicker and made of harder types of rubber. This is a softer rubber. You’ll see that I can move these lugs around, and it does really nice across a lot of different surfaces, without being overly aggressive and while still being aggressive enough to tackle soft stuff.

    From a lug standpoint, you can see lots of lugs in a cleat design, though again, medium-ish profile on that cleat. There are forward-facing lugs, rear-facing lugs, and a full rubber outsole so that there aren’t any openings where you’re going to be getting stuff poked into it and foam is going to come off. This is something you see in the industry quite a bit now. These small holes on the outsole just show off the rock plate. What’s underneath here is a fabric plate, versus being plastic. It’s like nylon thread tightly woven together to provide that rock plate. So what you get is a fairly flexible shoe. It’s not as flexible as the Peregrine 9, which you could fold in half, but it has a rock plate. I think even on the ruggedest of terrain, this is a shoe that you can count on that’s not going to overly fatigue your foot, but it’s also not a tank-like shoe, so it’s not going to provide total protection.

    The other thing I’ll highlight are these these round circles all over the outsole. These were introduced in the Saucony Mad River TR, and are for putting sheet-metal screws in your shoes in the wintertime. This gives you a guide for where to push those into. This is an interesting touch for giving you a shoe that works in a lot of different conditions. And in the conditions that it doesn’t, it gives you a template of how to use them on slick conditions.

    The Saucony Peregrine 11 outsole.

    Saucony Peregrine 11 Midsole

    Moving over to the Saucony Peregrine 11 midsole, we have a more traditional foam midsole. This is Saucony’s PWRRUN midsole, which has been around for a handful of years, so it’s not some new fangled nitrogen-gas-injected type of midsole. It is very much a traditional type of foam. It’s got nice spring, it’s got good durability, it lasts a while, again provides some protection, doesn’t feel too spongy, definitely a mid-cushion foam here, not too soft or hard. It’s a single-density foam all the way around the shoe.

    This is a neutral shoe and again, with about a 4mm drop. On the inside of the shoe you can see this Styrofoam-looking foam. This is actually the PWRRUN+ by Saucony, their higher-end foam. This is a layer that exists on top of the midsole. It gives a little bit of extra cushion, for fatigue and springiness. But it’s not the entire midsole so it’s kind of a combination, providing some of that new-age foam that’s highly resilient and highly springy, but maybe not as good of an application for the trail. They give you a little bit here on the midsole, adds some comfort.

    The medial view of the Saucony Peregrine 11.

    Saucony Peregrine 11 Upper

    Let’s talk about the upper on the Saucony Peregrine 11. This is a much more streamlined upper. For comparison, let me pull in the last version. You can see lots of overlays, big rubbery stuff all along the midsole, lots of stuff on this upper in the Saucony Peregrine 10. Fast forward to the Peregrine 11, and you’ll see a much more simplified upper. Yes, there are still some plastic overlays. The heel is fairly similar but from about mid-heel and up to the toe, there’s a much more streamlined look. It is a booty type of construction. This mesh is all the way across the shoe. But overall, a much more simplified upper, which I think adds to breathability, it adds to less complexity, it adds a less rigid upper. In past shoes, they almost felt a little stiff because there was so much overlay. You get a little more loose feeling but, still locked in.

    If you look in this section in the middle of the upper, you can see strapping, and that strap connects these eyelets in the middle part of the shoe with the midsole. You have that on both sides of the shoe, right here around the logo, and that anchors right into these middle eyelets. So a really good fit for an upper, to think the difference is maybe from a classic Peregrine, it’s a little more approachable, a little less athletic. The old Peregrines were much more narrow. This gives you a little more room to breathe in your foot and also it’s a more airy upper.

    From a toebox standpoint, there are some overlays here. It’s not an overly hard toebox, but it’s some of that laminated material that wraps around the toe. Of course the outsole comes up here, gives you some good sturdiness at the front to keep you from kicking some things. In the back from a heel-cup standpoint, it’s fairly soft up top all the way until we hit this line about one third of the way down, where you can see the plastic on the outside of the shoe. That’s where the heel cup starts. It doesn’t fold down totally, it’s not super flexible, but flexible up top for where your Achilles is at, gives you some padding and some cushioning.

    If we transition to the inside, you can see that booty from about two eyelets from the top and it goes down most of the way inside the shoe. It gives you some protection and seamless fit around these midsole straps while preventing dust, dirt, and debris from falling directly into the shoe. It’s not fully gusseted so it’s not a full booty-type of feel but for the most part it keeps all the threads from being on you, it keeps a smooth fit inside of the shoe.

    A lateral view of the Saucony Peregrine 11.

    Saucony Peregrine 11 Overall Impressions

    In closing, what separates this shoe, the Saucony Peregrine 11, is that this is a classic definition of a trail shoe. It does a lot of things just right, without any extra fluff. In today’s industry, that’s a fairly interesting take.

    There’s no carbon plate in here. It’s not maximum cushion. It’s not meant for downhill running. It doesn’t have hyper aggressive, specific lugs. It doesn’t have a rocker. It’s just a trail shoe and I think that’s fairly refreshing and a piece of the market that’s not being really concentrated on much right now.

    It probably leans more toward minimal than most shoes, but there’s enough cushioning for long distance. There’s enough tread for a variety of conditions from dirt road to mud. You have an upper that breathes pretty well. You’ve got foam that, while not the most advanced foam on the market, is plenty for a long time on your feet. There’s protection with a rock plate, it’s a good-fitting upper. It feels good going downhill and uphill. There are no mechanical things to make this shoe work for you but it also doesn’t work against you.

    It fits this middle ground of just working, and the price is fairly indicative of the fact that it lacks, in a good way, some of those higher-end features. It’s $120, that’s not pocket change, but in today’s trail running shoe market there’s not much cheaper than that unless you get into some of the lesser, almost road shoes that are given a gray color and say trail shoe.

    Saucony’s put some effort into this. This shoe had a weird hiatus where in some of the earlier versions it was really specific about what it did. It was kind of a lightweight, fast, shorter heel-to-toe drop shoe that was built for trail running. And it had a very specific following. Then it hit some middle ground for a couple of years where it wavered back and forth. In the last couple iterations, you’ve seen it swing back toward that initial model of being a trail running shoe that’s kind of light, kind of fast, kind of luggy, serves a large market, and works for a variety of conditions. Saucony has finally made this their go-to shoe.

    Other Versions of the Saucony Peregrine 11

    There are three different versions of this shoe. This is the standard Saucony Peregrine 11, of which we tested the men’s version. See also the Saucony Peregrine 11 women’s version. There’s also a Saucony Peregrine 11 ST men’s version and Saucony Peregrine 11 ST women’s version, which stands for “soft terrain” and which have really long lugs. There’s also the Saucony Peregrine 11 GTX men’s version and Saucony Peregrine 11 GTX women’s version, which is Gore-Tex for waterproofness and warmth.

    There are some really interesting colorways that they’re having fun with. So whether that’s this 1990s look, there’s a shoe that looks very much like an old school track flat all the way to some collaborations with other companies. While that doesn’t change the shoe’s performance, it shows that there’s an investment and that they’re pointing people toward this shoe. I think the timing’s right. The market is ripe for just a trail shoe, a shoe that can really do a lot for you, that can cover a lot of distance, cover a lot of ground. It’s modern in its heel-to-toe drop and modern in some of the foam that it uses, but it’s not so modern that it’s $200. It’s not so modern that it it’s for only a specific type of running. It’s a really excellent middle ground.

    Call for Comments

    Questions, comments, feedback on the Peregrine 11 or previous versions, leave those below. Thanks for watching, we’ll catch you next time.

    [Editor’s Note: If you’re affiliated (i.e., an employee, ambassador, etc.) with a brand, please share your relation in each of your comments on this article. Thanks!]

    A top view of the Saucony Peregrine 11.

    Saucony Peregrine 11 Review by Travis Liles.

  • WeRunFar Profile: Andrew Todd
    17 June 2021

    The post WeRunFar Profile: Andrew Todd appeared first on iRunFar.

    You might have heard of Flyathlon, an annual trail running series organized by the nonprofit Running Rivers that combines fly fishing, camaraderie, fundraising, and microbrews. Based in Colorado and Iowa, Flyathlon race routes follow a waterway where participants stop at any point in the run to fish. At the race’s end, they submit a photo of their catch for an opportunity to win an award like Biggest and Smallest Fish. Or, if you’ve ever seen trail runners or ultrarunners randomly halt to fish in a stream mid-race, they might be “fish slapping,” when racers fish during an established race not organized by Running Rivers.

    Far less likely is that you’ve heard the background of why Running Rivers founder Andrew Todd launched this unique race series whose motto of “run, fish, beer” is a riff on the traditional triathlon. In the eight years since its conception, the venture has fundraised close to $250,000 for native trout conservation projects. Todd—a family man and runner seeking to make outdoor recreation less intimidating and more inclusive—voluntarily used his expertise in biology and environmental engineering to preserve the wild natural resources from which we thrive and survive as runners and people. Through fun events, his hope is to get more folks engaged in that preservation process, too.

    Andrew Todd after landing a monster cutthroat trout at an undisclosed location way back in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Colorado. All photos courtesy of Andrew Todd unless otherwise noted.

    Todd grew up in Denver, the now-bustling capital of Colorado, with two older brothers and a younger sister: Mike, Jim, and Kristin. He’s the avid angler among his siblings, who were first introduced to a fly rod on an annual trip they took with their dad to Aspen, Colorado. Their dad, Jim, was a pediatrician and infectious-disease specialist, and would attend a conference in the Elk Mountains, so they’d relax by tossing a line on a creek after business was wrapped up. Growing up, Todd played lacrosse—which he pursued while earning his undergraduate degree at Williams College in Massachusetts—and also twice enrolled in a formative outdoor leadership program. During the program, the group completed a seven-day backpacking trip in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, the southernmost subrange of the Rocky Mountains and a large cluster of Colorado’s 14,000-foot peaks, 240 miles south of Denver. During that hike, they summited Humbolt Peak and Crestone Needle, which are ingrained in Todd’s memory. A rugged road along a route he hiked during those two back-to-back summers is now nearby to a cabin that he bought later in life, with his wife Cassie. His connection to that mountain range later influenced his path of scientific research, conservation work, and the earliest Flyathlon locations.

    After finishing his undergraduate studies, Todd moved back to Colorado, where he worked on his masters degree and PhD in environmental engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder. “I wanted to study engineering and the environment to work on rivers and streams and do restoration. It turns out, that field is a more a focus on wastewater treatment. But I had a really awesome advisor at UC Boulder who allowed me to make the degree what I wanted it to be, which was to focus on engineering in the environment, so that I could study how rivers formed and stream ecology—which was my favorite course in graduate school—and put me on the path I’m on now,” says Todd. At a mutual friend’s party, Todd reconnected with Cassie, who he’d gone to high school with but hadn’t seen in years. She was going to veterinary school at Colorado State University, 65 miles north of Boulder. Around that time, Todd also got involved in his first formal run event, which his brothers roped him into.

    A Colorado boy and his brook trout (circa 1982). Photo: Dr. James Todd

    “In college, lacrosse consumed my physical fitness. After college, I no longer had an organized sport and needed to find a way to stay in shape—I was not. My brothers challenged me, because they were older and out of college and had started road running, to run the St. George Marathon, in Utah, with them. It crushed me. I decided I liked the zen of long-distance running even though I was terrible at it. I did a couple more road marathons,” says Todd. After completing his degrees, Todd’s first workforce job was as a research biologist for U.S. Geological Survey. He hiked through remote wilderness all over Colorado and the U.S. West and realized there are countless places he’d like to go fish. Around 2001, an idea was born. After his fieldwork, he’d trail run to those gorgeous bodies of water, fly rod in hand to catch fish, and run back to his basecamp, where a cooler full of food and beer was ready. One such destination where his research took him later became a present-day route for the Flyathlon events.

    “I was researching cutthroat trout around the Rio Grande. That fish is native to Colorado’s San Luis Valley and northern New Mexico. As the climate has warmed, these remote watershed flows have become less reliable, there are more extreme flow events, and some of these creeks where these fish are might be not dependable in the future. I saw that there are opportunities for better watersheds for the long-term survival and a different climate future for these fish,” explains Todd.

    Three years after debuting the first official Flyathlon event, in collaboration with Colorado Trout Unlimited, Todd decided to launch a Colorado-based nonprofit that could funnel the event profits directly into native trout conservation projects. The year was 2016 and Running Rivers was born. One of their inaugural efforts was to donate $25,000 to the first phase of the 2020 Sand Creek watershed reclamation project, located in Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, adjacent to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Sand Creek watershed is a strong, sustainable location for the preservation of the native Rio Grande cutthroat trout, thanks to three large headwater lakes and more than 15 miles of frigid perennial river habitat.

    Celebrations at the 2019 Middle Creek Flyathon in Colorado.

    Today, Running Rivers has supported an array of conservation projects from trail restoration along the East Middle Creek in the Rio Grande National Forest to educational signage about a recent Colorado River cutthroat trout discovery near Steamboat Springs. To raise additional funds and educate folks in a creative way, they launched another ongoing collaboration with local microbreweries dubbed the Rare Fish / Rare Beer Project. The organization partners with conservation-centric brewers to develop limited-edition craft beers with names and labels that celebrate a native fish within a backyard watershed. To date, they’ve released seven beers including the Trucha Grande, a collaboration with Three Barrel Brewing Company, Laws Whiskey House, and the Colorado Malting Company. Trucha Grande celebrates the Rio Grande cutthroat trout.

    Four years ago, Todd transitioned out of the U.S. Geological Survey to take a new role with the Environmental Protection Agency. At first, his responsibilities included technical support and risk assessment for superfund sites in this U.S. region—in other words, helping the most polluted water sites in the country.

    “My job was to characterize the risk of those sites to the ecological environment. The Bonita Peak Mining District was my primary focus, which was the headwaters of the Animas River, and I came on after the 2015 Gold King Mine spill,” explains Todd. The Gold King Mine is located near Silverton, Colorado, and the Hardrock 100 course. Within 24 hours of the spill, the Animas River between Silverton and Durango turned completely yellow, due to the oxidation of dissolved iron, which was released in the waste water. “The work is ongoing and will be ongoing for years. There are a ton of legacy mines up there. When you have hundreds of mines, where do you focus? You can’t work on them all nor would it make sense to, because some are higher risk and contributing more contaminants. The process now is to evaluate the highest risk sites and prioritize how to address those. Some of these mines are in places where guys seemed like they were dared to go—the remediation challenges are significant. Abandoned mines are one of the biggest water-quality issues of the American West.”

    Furthermore, decaying and collapsing metal pipes and tunnels are highly toxic to organisms in creeks including trout, which are sensitive, as are the insects that the trout feast on. Last year, Todd was promoted to a management role, so he oversees the group that works with the states and tribes in this region to ensure they comply with water quality regulations for human health and the aquatic environment. His six-state region includes Colorado, Wyoming, North and South Dakota, Utah, and Montana.

    Though the Flyathlon events started and continue in Colorado, an event has since been brought to Iowa and Todd hopes other locations will seek to become host destinations, too. Todd says, “Someone Iowa reached out to start their own and has been running it for five years. They’ve turned it into what they want it to be. We asked they maintain the core principles with fundraising and supporting fly fishing and native trout conservation. If and when these Flyathlon events expand more, it’ll be because someone is equally passionate about those things and wants to make it their own for the benefit of their local resources.”

    The coveted Troutman belt buckle, handmade by metal sculptor and fly fishing badass, Amanda Willshire. Photo: Amanda Willshire

    The nonprofit has an 11-member board and everyone, including Todd, volunteers for the organization’s mission. With the help of sponsors, the organization offers prizes to incentivize registrants to fundraise $250 minimum per race. The top fundraisers are rewarded with gifts like a YETI cooler or Scarpa gear. As an increasing sum as been raised, the board is working on developing a formal application process for the conservation funds.

    Todd explains, “I’m in the industry and couple of our board members are as well, so we hear about a lot of conservation projects through our research, personal connections, and word of mouth. Sometimes someone tells us, ‘We’re $5,000 short of building a barrier.’ A big part of the conservation of these fish is isolating them from non-native fish, so a large cost of native trout is building barriers to prevent non-native fish from coming into habitat. We can provide that fund fast. If it’s a project like on the Sand Creek watershed, I knew about it and was involved in developing the science around this watershed, so when it came time to pay $18,000 for a helicopter, Colorado Parks and Wildlife could approach us. We don’t want it to be perceived as you can’t be funded unless you know these three people, but this also allows us to be nimble versus a drawn-out process of going through applications and an issue of us not having the bandwidth to process those applications. We want this process to be transparent to the people who are asking their friends and family to contribute. We’re not giving money to our buddies to buy a jeep for fishing.”

    One of the organization’s coveted challenges is the Troutman. Troutman is a unique challenge requiring one to catch the grand slam of trout—meaning one each of a brook, brown, cutthroat, and rainbow trout–run at least a marathon, climb at least 3,000 feet, and drink a beer of at least 12% ABV all within 12 hours.

    Most recently, during the pandemic, Running Rivers launched a virtual event, the 2020 Socially Distanced Flyathlon Challenge. More than 100 athletes nationwide ran and fished in their backyards and home streams and raised more than $25,000 for native trout projects. The virtual event was such a success that it will be ongoing as the Long Distance Release Flyathlon. In the past, Running Rivers has also hosted events for kiddos like the Kids Flyathlon in Staunton State Park, where 75 young runners ran a loop by the ponds and drank root-beer floats at the finish line.

    Mayhem at the starting line of the 2019 Kids Flyathlon, held at Staunton State Park in Colorado. Photo: Craig Hoffman

    As for Todd’s goals, he finished an unsupported 50 miler through the Sangre de Cristo Mountains last year. In August, he’s planning on racing the Staunton Rocks! Marathon & Half Marathon. He’ll also go for the Ültroüt challenge. Recently conceptualized by Todd and iRunFar’s Editor-in-Chief Bryon Powell, who serves on the Running Rivers board, the Ültroüt challenge asks participants to run at least 50 miles with an elevation gain of more than 5,555 feet, catch five fish species (four must be trout), and drink a craft beer of 15% ABV within 18 hours. No one’s yet started—or completed—this adventure.

    When he’s not racing, he’ll be spending time with Cassie, his parents, kids Kate and Lane, and three Terriers Eddie Vedder, Pearl, and Bee Girl. And of course, he’s planning on giving back to our environment through conservation efforts, all while facilitating memorable events that rope others onto the conservation bandwagon, too.

    A Colorado boy and his girls (wife Cassie and daughters Lane and Kate) on an adventure on the Big Island of Hawaii.

    Regardless of whether a trail runner chooses to volunteer at a regional race event, does trail work with a local conservation organization, or lends a hand at an established state or national park, we all have an opportunity to give back to the wild spaces we use, cherish, and want to preserve for years and generations to come.

    As Todd says, “By pairing these two activities, trail running and fly fishing, I hope people see that we’re in these incredible places when we’re running. I hope that they can take their time and recognize that there’s more to that environment than just the trail—I want people to be more aware. Now, a new pressure is being created from more people realizing that the outdoors exists. If we have all these people getting interested in these wild places, I hope there are opportunities for runners to be more conscious and to give back and invest in it—it won’t be as awesome if we’re all using and not giving back.”

    Call for Comments

    Calling all stories about Andrew Todd. Leave a comment to share your story about running, fly fishing, or drinking a bit of beer with him!

    Cheers-ing success following the inaugural Troutman challenge with a 13% ABV Four Grains in the Membrane by Denver, Colorado-based Baere Brewing Company. Photo: Erik Myhre

    WeRunFar Profile: Andrew Todd by Morgan Tilton.

  • Deseret Peak: Climbing the Twin Couloirs (Insta360 GO 2)
    17 June 2021
  • Kansas’s New Rockin’ K 50K
    17 June 2021

    As one of the oldest ultras in Kansas, Rockin’ K has had time to develop a bit of a reputation. After dwindling numbers in the 50-miler, the race organization decided to retire that distance (for now) and introduced the Rockin’ K 50K. Now runners can choose between a “marathon that’s really an ultra,” or they can run an actual ultra.

    The post Kansas’s New Rockin’ K 50K appeared first on Ultrarunning Magazine.

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