Motorcycle Blogs

Motorcycle Blogs

26 May 2022

Motorcycle Blogs Motorcycle Blogs
  • Working On Projects
    26 May 2022

     It all started to get to me a couple weeks ago.I was down in the basement looking for some clutch parts for my 1971 Yamaha R5 when I realized I have to start selling stuff off.I looked at the wood lathe that I brought home 2 years ago  from the clean out of my friend Pete's late parents home and decided it has to go . Put it up on Craigslist at 500 bucks and got no action so I lowered it to 400 and sold it in one day !

    The guy came for it this past Saturday . Now that it's gone I'm starting to focus on the other stuff I want to sell. The nice orange 1970 Yamaha DS6C is in need of a new home.Been waiting on my friend to come and buy it like he has indicated he wants to do and I'm becoming impatient .I ran another ad on Craigslist for it.A guy from California has shown interest. We email and talk on the phone about 2 strokes.He knows it's spoken for but is still interested if the deal with my friend never happens.So,the ad is up for a day or so and my friend emails me telling me he has to go to Florida until the 21st of may and he wants to come for the bike when he returns.Still waiting ! Today is the 26th.It's getting old , and I'm getting frustrated. It's taking up space in my shop and preventing me from getting started on the next bike build.


     

    So. ,I pulled out the power washer and blasted off my 1965 Valiant wagon. Decided to work on the cars . It has been sitting up on jack stands for over a year now. Got it nice and clean then cleaned the front porch of the house and the furniture that resides there. Now that these jobs are out of the way I'm starting to work on my new pick up ,the 2000 Chevy S10. It needs brakes ,shocks ,and exhaust work to get it ready for inspection .To do this I need to get the old 1976 Dodge Aspen up and running  so I can use it and start to advertise it for sale.It needs to go next ! Yesterday I got it running and out from my work area , gave it a complete cleaning and service ,took it out for a ride and got the S10 back behind the fence in the work area. There is a for sale sign in the window of the Aspen so as I use it perhaps it will get sold.I sure hope so 'cause it needs to go as does my old 1971 Chevy C20 pick up .Once the Aspen is gone it goes. The process of selling off my unneeded stuff to help build the down payment fund for a house out west has begun . The 1966 Valiant convertible is also going to be up for sale at some point too.It's time for me to get to it and get the hell out of New York.My wife retires in just under 2 years so it's time to lose this stuff and lighten up the load .So,today I start the day fooling with the Aspen some making it run a little better then it's on to the brakes in the Chevy S10. I'm liking this little truck more and more as I use it and get the bugs out of it.She's running pretty good now and with that 4 cylinder 2.2 motor gets decent gas mileage .I still can't believe I paid 20 dollars for 4 lousy gallons of gas yesterday !



    Well,it's time to start my day .It's 8:15 AM on a beautiful sunny day here in NY . A good day to get outside and work .


  • Moonshine: 1978 Suzuki TS100 by @houseofcustomland x...
    26 May 2022


    Moonshine: 1978 Suzuki TS100 by @houseofcustomland x @minority_custom, with @ido.ins hand-lettering. Built for their kustom kulture mini-museum in Surabaya City, Indonesia, and nicknamed “Padang Bulan” (Moon Shine). Full story today on BikeBound.com! ⚡️Link in Bio⚡️ https://instagr.am/p/CeBVZxRujEW/

  • Malaysia Could Soon Require ABS On All Motorcycles 150cc And Up
    26 May 2022
    The Malaysian government seeks to improve safety given the country’s reliance on motorbikes for mobility.
  • Malaysia Could Soon Require ABS On All Motorcycles 150cc And Up
    26 May 2022
    The Malaysian government seeks to improve safety given the country’s reliance on motorbikes for mobility.
  • The Motron Nomad 125 Is A Sporty Beginner-Friendly Naked Bike
    26 May 2022
    Sharp styling and decent performance make this bike from the KSR Group a solid first-timer’s choice.
  • Speed limiters will become mandatory for cars in July, bikes next?
    26 May 2022
    Image: 

    Speed limiting software is set to become mandatory for cars in the UK from July, but motorcycles remain unlimited, for now at least.

  • A braking error may have led to land speed record setter Zef Eisenberg's death
    26 May 2022
    Image: 

    The death of land speed world record holder Zef Eisenberg may have been down to a braking error, an inquest has been told.

  • Honda Developing Motorcycle Autopilot
    26 May 2022

    Back in 2017, Honda showed this bike equipped with its Riding Assist Technology at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. It was an early prototype showing its ability to self-balance. (Honda/)

    The idea of a motorcycle-autopilot system might be anathema to many, but the same technology that allows an increasing number of modern cars to steer, accelerate, and brake automatically is clearly heading to two wheels in the future.

    Most of us ride for pleasure, so a self-riding bike initially sounds as appealing as a steak that eats itself, to save you the trouble. But it’s hard to argue that hours of straight-line riding on a freeway can provide as much joy as a few minutes on a twisting back road. What’s more, as modern car safety systems prove, tech that can provide semi-autonomous driving can also step in to prevent or mitigate accidents. The fact that Honda—a pioneer of such systems on four wheels—is working to bring them to motorcycling is a logical progression.

    Honda might be lagging behind BMW, Ducati, KTM, and Kawasaki at the moment, when it comes to fitting radar-assisted adaptive cruise control and warning systems to bikes, but that’s likely to be a result of the firm’s tradition of developing technology in-house rather than adopting existing, off-the-shelf technology. Over the last couple of years, Honda has left a paper trail of patent applications that illustrate just how seriously it’s taking semi-autonomous riding, and now another such document has been published that shows how a host of individual systems can be integrated to work together in a seamless safety system.

    We’ve already seen patents showing that Honda is developing radar systems, likely to appear on models like the Gold Wing and Africa Twin initially. While the company’s own Riding Assist and Riding Assist-e concepts have revealed a working steering-control system, operating in tandem with automatic braking and acceleration to allow motorcycles to balance themselves at low speed—even without a rider on board.

    Related: Honda Patents Self-Steering Motorcycle


    This illustration simply shows all of the systems that the overall package would require. (Honda/)

    Its latest patent shows how those features can be combined, along with other technologies including: on-board cameras, a LiDAR (light detection and ranging) sensor, GPS, and short-range vehicle-to-vehicle communication systems to create a bike that can intervene when required with an autopilot-like cruise control or aid when the rider fails to spot or react to a danger.

    The patent, titled “Drive Assistance Device for a Saddle Riding Type Vehicle,” shows a motorcycle fitted with cameras, radar, and LiDAR that uses that array to build a 3D image of its immediate surroundings, tracking other objects and vehicles and effectively keeping an eye out in every direction to monitor for dangers. It describes a built-in steering servo, using the same “magnetostrictive” torque sensor technology (that Yamaha is using to test power-assisted steering on its 2022 works motocross bikes) that can distinguish between rider inputs and external forces—resisting movements of the wheel from bumps or potholes but helping to turn the wheel when you put pressure on the bars. There are also pressure sensors in the seat, handlebar grips and footpegs, allowing the bike’s computer to tell if you’re holding on with both hands, combined with a rider-facing camera fitted to the dash, monitoring your posture and weight distribution to help interpret your intentions.


    This illustration shows how the motorcycle (M) would avoid an obstacle in the road. In this case, a stopped motorcycle. (Honda/)

    It might sound over the top, but most of these systems are developments of ideas already used in high-end cars to enable semi-autonomous driving. Honda has plenty of experience here, as it was among the first to introduce radar-cruise control and lane-keeping systems on cars—going back to as early as 2004. Honda’s Japanese market Legend luxury sedan is the first available in the world with a Level 3 Autonomous system, which can pilot itself in congested traffic and in certain circumstances doesn’t even require the driver to pay attention and be ready to take control.

    Honda’s motorcycle version of the system, described in the new patent, includes adaptive cruise control and lane-keep assist as well as the ability to avoid obstacles in the road, but in some ways it’s actually more complex than the tech used on cars. In particular, it has to recognise the fact that bikes have much more flexibility when it comes to how they use the lanes they’re riding in. The patent explains that, when cornering automatically, a bike will use its sensors and GPS to straighten corners as much as possible, taking a wide entry line, cutting toward the apex and drifting wider again on the exit, all while staying in its lane. It also shows that when following another bike, the system will move to one side of the lane to create a staggered pattern and give more stopping distance.


    Fig. 10 shows how motorcycle P1 gets out of the way of a faster vehicle approaching from the rear (in Japan they ride on the left). Fig. 8 shows how the bike would take a curve autonomously. Fig. 9 shows how the system would automatically stagger the bike in the lane to allow for more stopping distance. (Honda/)

    Don’t expect to be able to buy a bike with this technology anytime soon. This is clearly a long-term project, and we can expect it to evolve over generations of the technology. A radar-assisted adaptive cruise control and lane-keep-assist system is likely to be the first step—probably coming on a future-generation Gold Wing—but in a decade’s time it’s quite possible that your bike will be able to step in and save you from an accident before you’ve even realized the risk was there.

  • The Motron Nomad 125 Is A Sporty Beginner-Friendly Naked Bike
    26 May 2022
    Sharp styling and decent performance make this bike from the KSR Group a solid first-timer’s choice.
  • Welcome from Tampa
    26 May 2022
    Welcome All,

    Glad to have found the forum! Owned a 2013 Victory Judge as my first bike for a couple of years, and just purchased a 2014 XC which is how I stumbled upon the forum! I appreciate all the insights from everyone here which really helped make it an easy decision! Cheers & Happy Riding!

    - Ratid
    View attachment 597817

Motorcycle Podcasts

Motorcycle Podcasts

26 May 2022

Motorcycle Podcasts Motorcycle Podcasts
  • Episode 693: MotoGP Le Mans & Listener Feedback
    26 May 2022

    Ahead of the MotoGP circus arriving in Mugello, Rich & Jim are back together to talk about the previous race in Le Mans and the continuing fallout regarding the Suzuki withdrawal announcement. There’s a bunch of brilliant subscriber feedback so thanks to our listeners for continuing to engage and support the show. Keep the questions coming! Zoom Zoom…….
    --
    ©2022 MotoPod
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  • Honda Is The Real Cheater
    26 May 2022

    this we we followed the lead of 98% of all other moto podcasts and got all sexy talking about tire pressures

    Worst bike #1 Yamaha Chappy
    Worst Bike #2 Vespa Pedali

    Support the show
  • Podcast 472: Texts From a Teenage Daughter w/Hailey and Shawn Thomas
    23 May 2022
    This week on our motorcycle podcast we are joined by 15 year old Hailey Thomas, daughter of BMW ambassador Shawn Thomas. She's got the keys to the kingdom. She's grown up on the back of her dad's bike on adventures, she's been given the best training you can get, and she's got all the best gear and a new BMW motorcycle. But is she riding for herself? Or is she riding because she knows it makes her dad happy? Or, is she just discovering who she is, and who she is meant to become; A true biker. One thing for sure is that the two of them have an incredible bond, one that is quite obvious in the relationship they have through texts. We take some of these texts and turn them into a game, which you can play along with. Next up, Shawn shares with us his latest career news, which includes representing BMW motorcycles at even more places and events, including the GS Trophy. And he brought along his partner in crime, Louise, who also shares with us that they are taking over Ride and Talk - The BMW Motorrad Podcast. Give it a listen. And lastly we open up a package sent from a listener, with goodies inside, and we read listener emails. Big announcement! We will be having our 500th episode party on Dec 3rd at Moto Talbott museum in Carmel Valley, and you're invited. Put it on your calendar! https://www.bmw-motorrad.com/en/experience/bmw-podcast.html#/section-discover-the-episodes adifferentagenda.com/tour/chickistan/ This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. www.motorcyclesandmisfits.com www.patreon.com/motorcyclesandmisfits www.zazzle.com/store/recyclegarage www.youtube.com/channel/UC3wKZSP0J9FBGB79169ciew
  • EP15: Shirley Petchprapa of issaralabs - Filmmaker, Director, Fabricator and Motorcycle Enthusiast
    21 May 2022

    Episode #15 of the Motorcycle Knuckle Busters podcast. Enjoy our next guest, Shirley Petchprapa. Shirley Petchprapa started her professional career as an art director and graphic designer. After 15 years working with clients including MTV and the fader Magazine, she moved to Los Angeles from her hometown NYC to make films. She directed a couple of internationally awarded shorts and worked with various clients directing and producing narrative and commercial content. Largely self-taught, she co-owned a fabrication shop in 2014 for 5 years working with metal, wood, and other materials, and then left and opened her own fabrication shop issaralabs. in 2019.

  • LAB-301-Test Ride and Review of the Harley-Davidson Nightster | A Trip to California
    20 May 2022

    Official Website: https://www.lawabidingbiker.com

    In this episode, I'm joined by Lurch and we discuss that Harley-Davidson recently flew me to Santa Barbara, California to test ride and review the 2022 Nightster.  It was a very quick 4-day trip, 2 of those days being travel days. Understand, Harley-Davidson paid for the flights, meals, and lodging. However, no contract was mentioned or signed and I was never told what I could or could not say, so I will give you an unbiased real-world biker review as always.

    Now, I had many questions about this new Nightster and anticipated how it might feel and handle when riding it. There was only one way to find out and it started when I arrived at the Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort where I'd be staying for the next few days, and I got checked into my room. I quickly made my way to dinner where Harley had set up the "instrument of expression" launch event. 

    SUPPORT US AND SHOP IN THE OFFICIAL LAW ABIDING BIKER STORE

    As I walked around the room this first night I had time to really think about what the new 2022 Nightster means now and to the future of Harley-Davidson as a company. I really had time to reflect on Harley-Davidson's rich history with their bikes of the past, and in many ways, they've carried much of that history over and put it into their present-day motorcycles. As Willie G. Davidson once said, "Everything we do is the notion that form follows function-but both report to emotion" and I wanted to see if that would be the case with the Nightster.

    But, what do these new water-cooled Revolutions Max engines in the Pan America, Sporster S, and now the 2022 Nightster with the 975T version really mean?  Is Harley fazing out the traditional big V-Twin air-cooled engines? During my time in and around Santa Barbara, I'd get these questions answered and a whole bunch more.  Make sure to watch my review video to find out the answers.  

    CHECK OUT OUR HUNDREDS OF FREE HELPFUL VIDEOS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL AND SUBSCRIBE!

    I found the 2022 Nightster to be a fast nimble bike that was very capable of carving up twisty canyon roads.  The horsepower may be intimidating to new riders, but that can be mitigated by the different ride modes.  The bike can be tamed down by using Rain Mode, then a rider could progress to Road Mode, and eventually Sport Mode.  The Nightster was designed with customization in mind.  I think Harley did a great job designing it.

    NEW FREE VIDEO RELEASED:

    There were a few negatives I found, and admittedly they are a bit nit-picky.  First, the front-mounted radiator is not visually appealing to me personally.  I know it's required to get the performance and horsepower out of the engine.  I guess I'm old-school and I'll just have to learn to get used to the radiator.  Secondly, the plastic trim on top of the tank (airbox) looks cheap and is a bit flimsy.  I would have liked to see something made of metal in its place.  And lastly, the control switch housings were also made of plastic.  I would prefer metal ones like on my Street Glide Special.  

    Sponsor-Ciro 3D
    • CLICK HERE!
    • Innovative products for Harley-Davidson & Goldwing
    • Affordable chrome, lighting, and comfort products
    • Ciro 3D has a passion for design and innovation
    Sponsor-RickRak
    • CLICK HERE
    • The Ultimate Motorcycle Luggage Rack Solution
    • Forget those messy straps and bungee cords
    • Go strapless with a RickRak quick attach luggage system & quality bag
    Sponsor-Butt Buffer
    • CLICK HERE
    • Want to ride longer?
    • Tired of a sore and achy ass?
    • Then fix it with a high-quality Butt Buffer seat cushion?
    New Patrons:
    • David Harris of Chesapeake, Virginia
    • Jasen Judy of Sunbury, Pennsylvania
    • Dave Jennings of Banton, Glasgow, United Kingdom
    • Eric Steiner of Sarver, Penssylvania
    • Paul Krampitz of Cromwell, Connecticut
    • Nelson Williamson of Murpfreesboro, Tennessee
    • Henk ter Haar of Hoevelaken, Netherlands
    • Kelly Thompson of Fairfield , Iowa
    • Phillip Molloy of Warren Lodge, Armthorpe, United Kingdom
    If you appreciate the content we put out and want to make sure it keeps on coming your way then become a Patron too! There are benefits and there is no risk. Thanks to the following bikers for supporting us via a flat donation:
    • Steve Stratton of Stockton, California
    • Hector Velez of Fulton, Maryland
    • Jason Despain of Crestview, Florida

    ________________________________________________________ FURTHER INFORMATION:   Official Website: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com   Email & Voicemail: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com/Contact   Podcast Hotline Phone: 509-731-3548 HELP SUPPORT US! JOIN THE BIKER REVOLUTION! #BikerRevolution #LawAbidingBiker SHOP IN THE LAW ABIDING BIKER STORE  BECOME A MEMBER AND GET BENEFITS  GET PREMIUM MOTORCYCLE TUTORIAL VIDEOS  WATCH OUR MOTORCYCLE DOCUMENTARY FILMS HERE LEAVE A FLAT DONATION  CHECK OUT THE WEEKLY PODCAST  ⓕ FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK ⓕ  FOLLOW US ON TWITTER 

  • Unexpected Turns - Tiffani Burkett and David Hayward
    19 May 2022

    Sometimes when the unexpected happens it can be a good thing, and for Tiffani Burkett it turned out to be a very good thing. After losing her job, Tiffani decided to take the opportunity to go on a motorcycle trip. That trip led to more travel, a new career and to meeting someone who would become very important in her life. 

    Photos and links can be found on our website at adventureriderradio.com. If you've enjoyed this show please tell your friends, family and riding buddies about it. If you'd like to help out we'd love to get your support and to say thanks we'll send you stickers and maybe even give you a shout out on RAW.

    You can follow Adventure Rider Radio: Facebook: AdventureRiderRadio Instagram: @adventureriderradio Twitter: @ADVRiderRadio

  • Podcast 471: The Quail Recap and the Lance Percival Doll
    16 May 2022
    This week on our motorcycle podcast we give our recap on the Quail Motorcycle Gathering. We had perfect weather, amazing bikes and loads of friends there. It was a magnificent party. We talk about some of our favorite bikes, some interesting engines, and clever designs we discovered. Big thanks to Law Tigers for sponsoring Emma's booth, and giving us a base camp. Next up Liza asks some random questions of the group, which leads to some inappropriately named things, which then leads to a spontaneous game. Big announcement! We will be having our 500th episode party on Dec 3rd at Moto Talbott museum in Carmel Valley, and you're invited. Put it on your calendar! And lastly, we read listener emails. With Liza, Stumpy John, Miss Emma, Douglas, Naked Jim and Bagel. www.wetravel.com/trips/dolomites-…canazei-62002307 adifferentagenda.com/tour/land-of-t…giants-stumpy/ adifferentagenda.com/tour/chickistan/ This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. www.motorcyclesandmisfits.com www.patreon.com/motorcyclesandmisfits www.zazzle.com/store/recyclegarage www.youtube.com/channel/UC3wKZSP0J9FBGB79169ciew
  • E14: Crazy Chuck from Discovery Channel’s Moonshiners
    14 May 2022

    Episode #14 of the Motorcycle Knuckle Busters podcast. Enjoy our next guest, Crazy Chuck from Discovery Channel’s Moonshiners. He is well known for his special recipe “Purple Jesus”. You may also know him from his riding name “Chopper Chuck”.  We talk about him growing up in small-town Ohio, Motorcycle Racing, and him being on Moonshiners. 

  • Unfinished Business - An Adventure Cut Short
    13 May 2022

    Todd Ensign and Christian Ensign are a father and son who found themselves lacking adventure in life. So, for his dad’s birthday Christian gifted him a motorcycle and a motorcycle safety course. Soon they set out on a two month motorcycle adventure having some extraordinary experiences. Everything was going great until it all fell apart. Todd and Christian ended up not only getting more than they bargained for but they also found joy and healing, and discovered that overcoming the challenges was just as rewarding as the good times. If you've enjoyed this episode please consider supporting this show by going to adventureriderradio.com/support and also by checking out our show sponsors.

    Follow Adventure Rider Radio: Facebook: AdventureRiderRadio Instagram: @adventureriderradio Twitter: @ADVRiderRadio

    For more on this episode see the show notes at Adventure Rider Radio.

  • LAB-300-Motorcycle Projects We're Doing and More!
    11 May 2022

    Official Website: https://www.lawabidingbiker.com

    In this episode, we discuss several motorcycle projects that are going on in the Law Abiding Biker shop.  I took some time off from my regular paying job and I've been working daily in the Law Abiding Biker studio and shop with Lurch.  There are, or will be, videos on the topics we discuss.  

    Projects we're currently working on:

    SEE ALL LAW ABIDING BIKER MEDIA DOCUMENTARY FILMS HERE!

    Here are a few upcoming projects:

    • Wheel Bearing Replacement 
    • Rocker Box Gasket Replacement
    • Exhaust Clamps Replacement
    SUPPORT US AND SHOP IN THE OFFICIAL LAW ABIDING BIKER STORE

    NEW FREE VIDEO RELEASED:

    CHECK OUT OUR HUNDREDS OF FREE HELPFUL VIDEOS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL AND SUBSCRIBE! Sponsor-Ciro 3D

    • CLICK HERE!
    • Innovative products for Harley-Davidson & Goldwing
    • Affordable chrome, lighting, and comfort products
    • Ciro 3D has a passion for design and innovation
    Sponsor-RickRak
    • CLICK HERE
    • The Ultimate Motorcycle Luggage Rack Solution
    • Forget those messy straps and bungee cords
    • Go strapless with a RickRak quick attach luggage system & quality bag
    Sponsor-Butt Buffer

    • CLICK HERE
    • Want to ride longer?
    • Tired of a sore and achy ass?
    • Then fix it with a high-quality Butt Buffer seat cushion?

    New Patrons:

    • Terry Durbin of Hershey, Pennsylvania • Charley Mills of San Antonio, Texas • Kevin Johnson of Clinton Township, Michigan • Dan Dabney of Roy, Utah  • Philip Walker of Montford, Wisconsin • Gary Wiese of Coquille, Oregon • Fredrick Kish of San Jose, California  • Kieth Barnett of Olympia, California • Jim Hadaway of Lakeland, Florida • Michael Hudson of Greenville, Tennessee • Terry Smith • Brian McMonagle of Cicero, New York 

    If you appreciate the content we put out and want to make sure it keeps on coming your way then become a Patron too! There are benefits and there is no risk. Thanks to the following bikers for supporting us via a flat donation:

    ________________________________________________________ FURTHER INFORMATION:   Official Website: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com   Email & Voicemail: http://www.LawAbidingBiker.com/Contact   Podcast Hotline Phone: 509-731-3548 HELP SUPPORT US! JOIN THE BIKER REVOLUTION! #BikerRevolution #LawAbidingBiker SHOP IN THE LAW ABIDING BIKER STORE  BECOME A MEMBER AND GET BENEFITS  GET PREMIUM MOTORCYCLE TUTORIAL VIDEOS  WATCH OUR MOTORCYCLE DOCUMENTARY FILMS HERE LEAVE A FLAT DONATION  CHECK OUT THE WEEKLY PODCAST  ⓕ FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK ⓕ  FOLLOW US ON TWITTER 

Vintage Motorcycle Blogs

Vintage Motorcycle Blogs

26 May 2022

Vintage Motorcycle Blogs Vintage Motorcycle Blogs
  • The Current News: May 26, 2022
    26 May 2022

    Hello dear readers and riders! Are you ready for the non-official start of summer this weekend? We know we sure […]

    The post The Current News: May 26, 2022 first appeared on The Vintagent.
  • Never Gonna Let You Go: Phil Lane’s Dunstall
    25 May 2022

    Few motorcyclists have owned their machine for half a Century, and of those, rarer still is an owned-since-new cafe racer. Phil Lane kept his for 50 years

    The post Never Gonna Let You Go: Phil Lane’s Dunstall first appeared on The Vintagent.
  • The Vintagent Trailers: Speed is Expensive
    25 May 2022

    Pure hell on the straightaway

    The post The Vintagent Trailers: Speed is Expensive first appeared on The Vintagent.
  • Quail 2022: Behind the Scenes
    21 May 2022

    Feeling impatient, I blurted out the case for Max Hazan’s Vincent as Best of Show from an aesthetic and technical standpoint.

    The post Quail 2022: Behind the Scenes first appeared on The Vintagent.
  • The Current News: May 20, 2022
    21 May 2022

    This week: new bikes from Plan B and Wyld, battery shortages push prices up, the Corduroy Enduro includes eBikes, and more!

    The post The Current News: May 20, 2022 first appeared on The Vintagent.
  • The Current News: May 14, 2022
    19 May 2022

    News about solid-state batteries: pie in the sky or a real breakthrough? New LiveWire looks promising, and Specialized delivers cactus!

    The post The Current News: May 14, 2022 first appeared on The Vintagent.
  • Hector Dobbs
    17 May 2022

     


    -SG- Back in the late forties I was at school with Noel and Jamie Dobbs from the Isle of Wight  (just across the water from Southampton) and as a matter of idle curiousity, I got in touch with Noel a while back to ask if he was connected atall with Hector G E Dobbs - winner of the 1925 Amateur TT.  The answer was - unfortunately - 'no' but what he did remind me was that he was a great-grandson of Bram Stoker, author of the original Dracula novel!  In fact my not very diligent search for HGED's family proved fruitless.  None the less, I did unearth some information  of general interest about him.

    Hector was born in May 1905 and attended the Royal Naval College in Dartmouth from September 1920 to July 1922 - when - unusual for Dartmouth graduates -  he joined the Engineering Branch of the Royal Navy.  By the time of the 1925 Amateur TT, he had risen to the dizzy heights of Sub-Lieutenant and doubtless by then he was earning enough to purchase the Model 18, which he rode in the event.  This machine was supplied to him in July 1925 by well known Norton dealers Pikes of Plymouth and appears to have been a fairly standard Model 18. Without wishing to belittle his win at just under 60 mph, it has been pointed out to me that some of the faster and more experienced riders retired for various reasons... He entered again in 1926 on a different OHV Norton also supplied by Pikes, and this machine seems to have been rather more special - it is shown in the records as having large tanks, a chain oiler, Terry saddle and steering damper.  The few photos I have seen  (not accessible)  also show it to have had an 8 inch Enfield front brake.  Unfortunately he retired as a result of a crash in very bad and foggy weather.  I have not found that he competed elsewhere on two wheels or if so, with what results but what does seem certain is that in the early thirties he was invalided out of the Navy and concentrated on trials driving and racing Rileys at Brooklands (with some success) and on a garage business near Southampton.   He died at the relatively young age of 63 in 1968.

    The first of the two photos attached (kindly provided by Bill Snelling) shows Dobbs wearing smart plus-fours, seated on his 1925  machine in the IOM, while the second shows him re-fuelling during the event  - note the John Bull rubbers on his controls - see scan below.


  • Another Vintage Norton appears ...
    17 May 2022

     


    -SG- I heard from Artie earlier in the month with a report on his Pukekohe race outing.  He took the Model 22 recently featured (23rd April) and it achieved a lap speed of just over 85 mph - which means it must achieve a speed at least 20mph faster than when new!  He also reported the first appearance of a 1930 Model 20 - apparently restored in 1974 or thereabouts,  and virtually unused since.  Although the gearbox has been changed to an LS type (original was CS), it looks a pretty tidy example. Thanks for the photos, Artie.

  • Electric Revolutionaries: Panel Discussion
    16 May 2022

    Electric Revolutionaries features 11 designers at the edge of the EV industry. A fascinating panel discussion was held at the April 14th reception.

    The post Electric Revolutionaries: Panel Discussion first appeared on The Vintagent.
  • The Vintagent Trailers: Caselli 66: Ride The Dream
    14 May 2022

    Never look back.

    The post The Vintagent Trailers: Caselli 66: Ride The Dream first appeared on The Vintagent.

UK Motorcycle Blogs

UK Motorcycle Blogs UK Motorcycle Blogs
  • VIDEO: The 2022 Shark Helmet Range

    Bruce spends time with Shark Helmet UK’s Racing & Technical Manager, Mark Eilledge, to look at the 2022 range and get advice on what to look out for when buying a new lid.

    For more details on the full range go to: https://www.nevis.uk.com/products/shark Special thanks to www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk for the use of their showroom, teas and coffees.

  • Vacancy: Advertising Sales Executive

    Are you ready for the hot seat?

    Mortons Media Group Ltd is a market-leading publisher of specialist print titles and websites, covering an array of hobbies and interests.

    We have a fantastic opportunity for someone to join our fast-paced Advertising Sales Team

    The right candidate will benefit from a competitive salary and excellent bonus/commission structure.

    Location: Horncastle, Lincs

    About the role

    As an Advertising Sales Executive, you will have an opportunity to implement your title(s) sales strategy and maximise revenues across our multi-media portfolio, while working to tight deadlines.

    You will manage and grow an established client database, helping them meet and exceed their marketing goals.

    A creative outlook is essential.

    About you

    • Sales experience – preferably in a media setting, although not essential
    • Proficient in digital media sales
    • Ability to build strong relationships
    • A dedicated self-starter
    • Strong negotiation and influencing skills
    • Ability to work to strict deadlines

    Benefits

    • Excellent bonus/commission structure
    • Generous pension scheme
    • Generous holiday entitlement
    • Healthcare benefits scheme

    To join our fast-moving team, please send us your CV and a cover letter.

    Ad Ref:  AD21

    Apply here

    Please refer to the HR privacy policy on our website.

  • The line-up is in: meet the 2022 Global Series Grid!

    Click here for more info on Vitesse T-Shirts UK

    See which gamer each MotoGP team has chosen for their attack on the 2022 Global Series in the MotoGP eSport Championship

    The 2022 Global Series is upon us and the line-up is confirmed for the MotoGP eSport Championship’s most critical phase!

    Twelve riders from five different countries will represent one of the current MotoGP teams in the five-round Global Series that determines with winner of the 2022 MotoGP eSport Championship.

    Competitors from Australia, the UK, Indonesia, Italy and Spain all make up a strong Global Series entry list, with a mixture of new blood and youthful hunger certain to challenge the experienced names that have tasted success in the five previous years of MotoGP eSport competition!

    Here is a run through each team’s eSport Rider selection.

    Mooney VR46 Racing Team: Sbadalongo (#4)
    Rookie Italian Sbadalongo (real name: Michele Giacon) caught the eye with a series of impressive showings in this year’s Pro Draft, as he scored 52 points from a possible 100. While this will be his first appearance in the Global Series, he will be aboard the competitive Mooney VR46 Racing Team Ducati, which should provide him with the occasional chance to surprise.

    Ducati Lenovo eSport Team: PieroRicciuti55 (#5)
    At 18 years of age, the Italian Piero Ricciuti is among the youngest competitors on this year’s Global Series grid. He was a European finalist in the 2020 WINDTRE Rising Stars series, and made an appearance at the final round of the 2020 Global Series as a reserve rider. He was the surprise of the 2021 Global Series, finishing second overall with LCR Honda. Now with Ducati Lenovo eSport Team, he’ll be a challenger for the crown.

    Suzuki ECSTAR eSports Team: AndreaSaveri11 (#11)
    After spending three years with Ducati Lenovo eSport Team, the 21-year old Italian is a high-profile mover in the rider market. Having finished third in 2018, then winning the championship in 2019, AndreaSaveri11 (previously AndrewZh) switches to Suzuki ECSTAR for 2022, where he will aim to build on the third place he scored in last year’s Global Series.

    WithU Yamaha RNF MotoGP Team: Vindex813 (#18)
    After his participation at the 2017 and 2018 editions the young Italian is back. Vindex813 (real name: Michael Amara) has proven pedigree at junior MotoGP eSport level. He was twice a champion in the hotly contested Rising Stars Championship in 2020 and 2021. Now stepping up for the WithU Yamaha RNF MotoGP Team, he’ll be keen to impress in his rookie season.

    Aprilia Racing eSport Team: Davidegallina23 (#22)
    The Italian Davidegallina23 makes a return to the Global Series after previous appearances in the 2018 and 2020 events. Hailing from Misano, on Italy’s bike-mad east coast, he scored a promising 46 points from 100 in this year’s Pro Draft. Using Aprilia’s brilliant 2022 RS-GP for the ten races ahead, don’t be surprised to see him regularly finish in the top six.

    Pramac Racing: MrTftw (#23)
    MrTftw (real name: Christopher Telep) quickly learnt the secrets of the MotoGP games to sensationally qualify for the Global Series without a great deal of practice in 2019. The 25-year old is back in the Global Series for a fourth successive season and switches from Avintia Ducati to Pramac Racing for 2022.

    LCR Honda CASTROL eSports Team: Cristianmm17 (#25)
    A regular fixture in the MotoGP eSport Championships, Cristianmm17 has experience racing at the highest level after finishing as the runner up in the 2017 series and third in both 2019 and 2020. After representing Suzuki ECSTAR eSports Team for three years, he switches to LCR Honda CASTROL eSports Team for 2022.

    Repsol Honda Team: adriaan_26 (#26)
    Adrian Montenegro, now known as Adriaan_26, caused a stir in 2020 by dominating the Global Series, scoring five race wins on his way to the championship. The 25-year old switched from Red Bull KTM Factory Racing to the Repsol Honda Team for 2021, when he finished fourth overall. One of the favourites to reclaim his crown.

    Tech 3 KTM Factory Racing: DarkBright (#49)
    Like Jack Hammer4658, DarkBright (real name: Matteo Mazzucchelli) remains with Tech 3 KTM Factory Racing for the second Global Series in succession. The 27-year old Italian performed well last year, finishing seventh overall in a competitive series. He’ll be a dark horse for podium finishes in this year’s ten-race series.

    Gresini Racing MotoGP: TateeGo (#46)
    Another rookie for 2022, TateeGo_51 (real name: Charles Hebingadil) hails from the bike mad Indonesia, the country which produced former LCR Honda CASTROL eSports Team Moe in previous years. He did enough in the Pro Draft – an eye-catching 81 points from 100 a possible 100 in the Rest of the World category – to earn a spot in Gresini Racing MotoGP for the ten races ahead. Expect the occasional top six finish.

    Red Bull KTM Factory Racing: Jack Hammer4658 (#67)
    Jack Hammer4658 (real name: Jack Hammersley) enters his second campaign in the Global Series and remains with Red Bull KTM Factory Racing for its 2022 challenge. Don’t let his youth fool you: despite being just 19 years old, Jack was a European finalist in the 2020 WINDTRE Rising Stars Series, and scored some promising results in last year’s Championship.

    Monster Energy Yamaha MotoGP: trast73 (#73)
    Trast73 (real name: Lorenzo Daretti) is almost synonymous with the MotoGP eSport Championship. Having won the championship in 2017 and 2018, he joined Monster Energy Yamaha 2019 and added a third title to his roster last year by winning the 2021 Global Series by 15 points. Back with Monster Energy Yamaha, he’ll start as the favourite this year.

    Fans can watch on selected TV broadcasters,  motogp.com, esport.motogp.com, and across a wide range of social media platforms including YouTube (via the MotoGP and MotoGP eSport channels), TwitterInstagram, Facebook (via MotoGP and MotoGP eSport pages) and Twitch via MotoGP and MotoGP eSport.

    Who will make their early mark at the first round of five? Be sure to tune in on Friday the 27th of May at 19:00 (GMT +2) as the definitive stage of the 2022 MotoGP eSport Championship gets underway!

    For more info checkout our dedicated eSport News page superbike-news.co.uk/esport/

    Or visit the official MotoGP eSport website motogp.com

    Click here for more info on Vitesse T-Shirts UK

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  • Speed limiters will become mandatory for cars in July, bikes next?
    Image: 

    Speed limiting software is set to become mandatory for cars in the UK from July, but motorcycles remain unlimited, for now at least.

  • A braking error may have led to land speed record setter Zef Eisenberg's death
    Image: 

    The death of land speed world record holder Zef Eisenberg may have been down to a braking error, an inquest has been told.

  • VIDEO: The 2022 Shark Helmet Range

    Bruce spends time with Shark Helmet UK’s Racing & Technical Manager, Mark Eilledge, to look at the 2022 range and get advice on what to look out for when buying a new lid.

    For more details on the full range go to: https://www.nevis.uk.com/products/shark Special thanks to www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk for the use of their showroom, teas and coffees.

    The post VIDEO: The 2022 Shark Helmet Range appeared first on MoreBikes.

  • Be The First to Ride The Future of KTM Adventure

    Click here for more info on Vitesse T-Shirts UK

    Join the world adventure week and be the first to ride the future of KTM Adventure.

    No matter what bike you ride, enter THE WORLD ADVENTURE WEEK and be amongst the selected few who will get to live a once in a lifetime KTM experience. Pack your panniers and get set to hit the road starting July 4th, 2022.

    • KTM is proud to announce THE WORLD ADVENTURE WEEK 2022 prizes
    • Six top finalists will get to live a unique riding experience the KTM way
    • A selection of daily prizes are also up for grabs for the greatest adventurers
    • Download the RISER app and make sure you register for the event now

    Spot a point on the map, get on your bike and GO ADVENTURE. Back for 2022, THE WORLD ADVENTURE WEEK is the perfect excuse to hit the open road alongside like-minded adventurers. The main challenge: to complete 1,000 km or more in just a week of riding.

    To join, simply download the RISER app, accept THE WORLD ADVENTURE WEEK in the Upcoming Challenges section and start recording your daily rides.

    THE WORLD ADVENTURE WEEK – Daily Challenges:
    // July 4th: Complete a ride and share it using #theworldadventureweek
    // July 5th: Ride through an altitude of 890 m
    // July 6th: Visit a KTM dealer and post a picture on social media
    // July 7th: Complete a total elevation gain of 1290 m
    // July 8th: Get at least five rides tracked Monday to Friday
    // July 9th: Ride 390 km in one go (+ or – 15 km)
    // July 10th: Complete a Pack Ride with at least two friends

    For 2022, KTM is proud to confirm a unique main prize for the most adventurous riders. All those riders who complete 1,000 km and at least three out of the seven daily challenges (meaning that UK riders can ‘drop’ the 890m altitude challenge – unless they’re on holiday!), will enter the draw to win a unique KTM experience.

    The first five finalists drawn will win a VIP and all expenses paid invitation to join a pure KTM riding activity, where they will get to test the next generation of KTM ADVENTURE machinery in pure Adventure conditions. The special event will take place in Europe and during the second half of the year. A sixth and final spot will be given to the rider with the greatest number of kilometers completed during the week.

    All riders who successfully complete 1,000 km or more during the week will receive a personalized award by KTM. For more information and the daily prizes, make sure you check theworldadventureweek.com.

    For more KTM Motorcycles UK news check out our dedicated page KTM Motorcycles UK News

    or head to the official KTM Motorcycles UK website www.ktm.com/en-gb.html

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  • Skidmarx screen the Honda NC750X

    Click here for more info on Vitesse T-Shirts UK

    New from Skidmarx, a tall and wide screen for the latest Honda NC750X that provides extra protection from wind and weather, adding to the bike’s already impressive practicality and all-round ability.

    Designed and manufactured by Skidmarx in their UK factory, the screen measures 48 cm tall by 29cm wide, with a distinctive ‘flip’ at the top to deflect wind blast over the rider.

    For owwners who don’t require any extra height, Skidmarx also produce a Sports Wide version, which is the same height as standard, but 29 cm wide, for additional weather protection.

    Made from 3mm cast acrylic, the screens fit directly onto existing mounting points, using the original fasteners, so no specialist tools or expertise are required.

    Available in clear, light grey and dark grey tints to fit Honda NC750X (2021 on), both designs sell for £74.95 (including VAT).

    Skidmarx also offer a rear hugger for the NC750X. Made from GRP fibreglass in their UK factory it is available in black, as well as a range of other colours, for £119.95.

    Call Skidmarx on 01305 780808 or visit www.skidmarx.co.uk for details.

    For more aftermarket news check out our dedicated page Motorcycle Aftermarket News

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  • All-new Zero DSR/X electric adventure model on its way?
    Image: 

    New VIN decoder documents appear to confirm the Zero DSR/X first teased two years ago is finally on its way as firm's first electric adventure model

  • The future is already here

    Click here for more info on Vitesse T-Shirts UK

    Gear up your electric motorcycle with GIVI’s specific accessories.

    The world is ours. And so is the responsibility to take care of it. Every day, society is becoming more aware of the importance of being sustainable and respectful in all areas of our lives. Thus, more and more users are opting for electric bikes as their main mode of transport. Vehicles that are on the rise and for which GIVI, the Italian brand of equipment for motorcycles, offers all kinds of accessories.

    One of GIVI’s main objectives has always been to make everyday life easier for motorcyclists, and to provide solutions to all their needs. Therefore, aware of the rise of electric vehicles and the importance of making a shift towards a more sustainable society, the Italian brand offers a lot of accessories and equipment developed for these vehicles. A series of products that perfectly combine functionality, innovation and style, being the best option for those who want to take a step towards electric and sustainable mobility.

    To make it easy and accessible for you to find the perfect gear for your electric bike, GIVI has set up a specific section on its official website. There, in addition to consulting all the articles available, you can search for your model and check which ones are compatible with it.

    Among the options offered by the Italian brand are cases for motorcycles and scooters, such as the C30 or B360, with different capacities to suit the needs of different types of users. The same applies to soft bags, which can range from leg bags (EA140 or EA139, for expample) to large saddle bags, as the EA136 (23 litres).

    GIVI also offers a wide range of smartphone and GPS holders, allowing you to move around town or on the road safely and with the confidence of knowing that you will reach your destination. And, to complete your equipment and that of your bike, it also offers helmetsthat combine perfectly with all styles and all kinds of accessories, such as handguards or an emergency kit that you should always carry with you.

    Be 100% electric, 100% functional and 100% stylish with GIVI.

    These, and many more GIVI items, provide a boost for motorcycle trips and make any journey on two wheels a more comfortable experience. 

    For more GIVI UK News check out our new dedicated page GIVI UK News

    For more information about these products or any other accessories for your motorcycle visit www.givi.co.uk or call 01327 706220

    Click here for more info on Vitesse T-Shirts UK

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Motorcycle Touring Blogs

Motorcycle Touring Blogs

26 May 2022

Motorcycle Touring Blogs Motorcycle Touring Blogs
  • Working On Projects
    26 May 2022

     It all started to get to me a couple weeks ago.I was down in the basement looking for some clutch parts for my 1971 Yamaha R5 when I realized I have to start selling stuff off.I looked at the wood lathe that I brought home 2 years ago  from the clean out of my friend Pete's late parents home and decided it has to go . Put it up on Craigslist at 500 bucks and got no action so I lowered it to 400 and sold it in one day !

    The guy came for it this past Saturday . Now that it's gone I'm starting to focus on the other stuff I want to sell. The nice orange 1970 Yamaha DS6C is in need of a new home.Been waiting on my friend to come and buy it like he has indicated he wants to do and I'm becoming impatient .I ran another ad on Craigslist for it.A guy from California has shown interest. We email and talk on the phone about 2 strokes.He knows it's spoken for but is still interested if the deal with my friend never happens.So,the ad is up for a day or so and my friend emails me telling me he has to go to Florida until the 21st of may and he wants to come for the bike when he returns.Still waiting ! Today is the 26th.It's getting old , and I'm getting frustrated. It's taking up space in my shop and preventing me from getting started on the next bike build.


     

    So. ,I pulled out the power washer and blasted off my 1965 Valiant wagon. Decided to work on the cars . It has been sitting up on jack stands for over a year now. Got it nice and clean then cleaned the front porch of the house and the furniture that resides there. Now that these jobs are out of the way I'm starting to work on my new pick up ,the 2000 Chevy S10. It needs brakes ,shocks ,and exhaust work to get it ready for inspection .To do this I need to get the old 1976 Dodge Aspen up and running  so I can use it and start to advertise it for sale.It needs to go next ! Yesterday I got it running and out from my work area , gave it a complete cleaning and service ,took it out for a ride and got the S10 back behind the fence in the work area. There is a for sale sign in the window of the Aspen so as I use it perhaps it will get sold.I sure hope so 'cause it needs to go as does my old 1971 Chevy C20 pick up .Once the Aspen is gone it goes. The process of selling off my unneeded stuff to help build the down payment fund for a house out west has begun . The 1966 Valiant convertible is also going to be up for sale at some point too.It's time for me to get to it and get the hell out of New York.My wife retires in just under 2 years so it's time to lose this stuff and lighten up the load .So,today I start the day fooling with the Aspen some making it run a little better then it's on to the brakes in the Chevy S10. I'm liking this little truck more and more as I use it and get the bugs out of it.She's running pretty good now and with that 4 cylinder 2.2 motor gets decent gas mileage .I still can't believe I paid 20 dollars for 4 lousy gallons of gas yesterday !



    Well,it's time to start my day .It's 8:15 AM on a beautiful sunny day here in NY . A good day to get outside and work .


  • Favorite Ride: Vermont Border Run
    22 May 2022
    The landscape around Lake Willoughby is stunning.

    A few years ago, Rider published my article about riding Vermont Route 100 from south to north, ending at the Haskell Free Library and Opera House, which straddles the U.S./Canada border. Someone wrote a letter to the editor asking how I got back. U.S. Route 5 runs along the east side of Vermont, and it happens to be another one of my favorite rides. It has all the elements of a great motorcycle road: beautiful scenery, fine curves, light traffic, and nice places to stop along the way. For this ride, I am again starting at the Massachusetts border and heading north, but it can also be run in reverse.

    Scan QR code above to view route on REVER, or click here

    I cross from Massachusetts into Vermont just south of Guilford, and the road almost immediately plunges into the woods, curling back and forth around the trees, a preview of what’s to come. First, I pass through Brattleboro. With 12,000 residents, it’s the largest town I’ll encounter today. Downtown consists of about three blocks of century-old brick buildings. It’s a little congested, but as soon as I clear the roundabout at the junction with State Route 9, everything eases up and I’m into rural Vermont in search of coffee.

    Just one of the many wonderful curves on U.S. Route 5.

    Check out more of Rider‘s Favorite Rides

    Putney General Store bills itself as Vermont’s oldest general store. It has creaky floors, good food, and – most importantly – good coffee. Properly caffeinated, I’m on my way, and U.S. 5 reveals its true character: rising, falling, and curving through the landscape. I lose myself in its rhythm.

    These petroglyphs are believed to have been carved by the Abenaki hundreds of years ago.

    In Bellows Falls, the falls don’t bellow anymore. The river was dammed in 1802 to aid with upstream navigation. Down near the river, a mysterious row of faces is carved into the rocks. The petroglyphs are believed to have been carved by the Abenaki hundreds of years ago. Curiously, a couple of the faces appear to have antennae. Evidence of an extraterrestrial visit? I ponder the question as I head out of town.

    The Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge is the longest two-span covered bridge in the world.

    U.S. 5 resumes its swooping, twisting, and turning as it tunnels through the trees. Nothing is too tight or unexpected, just a wonderful ride, and I drink it all in. There is a zig and a zag in Springfield before the enjoyment continues to the American Precision Museum in Windsor. It’s housed in the Robbins and Lawrence Armory, where they developed the concept of interchangeable parts in the 1840s. One display in the museum is a belt-driven machine that turns gunstocks. As the blank for the stock spins, the cutters gracefully move in and out. The accompanying video is mesmerizing. In addition to many machine tools, they also have Bridgeport milling machine serial number 001 – if you’re a gearhead, you’ll understand its significance.

    The American Precision Museum houses tools from the birthplace of modern manufacturing.

    Past Windsor, the road resumes its rhythm as it carves up around a golf course. All along the way, I pass small farms with their quintessential red barns. Some have stands selling fresh veggies, and I pick up some tomatoes and sweet corn.

    White River Junction, where the White River joins the Connecticut, has long been a transportation hub. The arrival of the railroad in the 19th century cemented its status. Today, it’s at the junction of Interstates 89 and 91 as well as U.S. Routes 4 and 5. All the amenities are near the highway interchange, and it’s easy to miss downtown, but with several restaurants to choose from, it’s a great spot for lunch.

    One of the many small farms along U.S. 5.

    A sign in the window at Dan & Whit’s General Store in Norwich declares, “If we don’t have it, you don’t need it!” Whether you are looking for an alarm clock or beer pong supplies, they have it. The paint department? It’s in a room behind the deli. Keep going and you’ll find a huge hardware section. The variety of stuff crammed into the space is remarkable, and it’s easy to get lost among the hams and hammers and hammocks.

    Leaving Norwich, there is a change. The hurry is gone, and I glide effortlessly around the curves, passing by narrow valley farms and through the villages of Thetford, Fairlee, Bradford, Newbury, and Wells River. In Barnet, there is another perceptible change as U.S. 5 parts ways with the Connecticut River and starts following the smaller Passumpsic River. The curves are tighter, the hills are closer, and at one point, U.S. 5 slips between the northbound and southbound lanes of I-91 for a bit.

    There is a “North Country” feel here close to the border.

    In St. Johnsbury, State Route 5A splits off as it passes the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum and the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Both 19th-century edifices were built by the Fairbanks family. Their Fairbanks Scales Company changed how commerce was done, and the family spent much of their fortune locally. Fine Victorian architecture lines both sides of the road here.

    After Lyndonville, U.S. 5 cuts through the landscape to West Burke, where I follow State Route 5A toward Lake Willoughby. The lake is the crown jewel of this ride. Nestled between Mount Pisgah and Mount Hor, it resembles a Norwegian fjord. The road runs up the east side, perched precariously between lake and ledge.

    With the border just ahead, it’s time to turn around.

    Past Lake Willoughby, there is a “North Country” feel. The rivers flow north toward the St. Lawrence River, the landscape is more open, and the trees seem shorter. Route 5A reconnects with U.S. 5 in Derby Center and heads for the Canadian border at Derby Line. There, within sight of the Haskell Free Library and Opera House, not far from the border, is a sign that declares “End 5.” Just beyond is Quebec and a large sign that says “Bonjour.” It’s time to head back. Maybe I’ll take Route 100.

    The post Favorite Ride: Vermont Border Run first appeared on Rider Magazine.
  • ADV Touring By Region: Best Routes In Canada
    19 May 2022

    With a total area of nearly 10 million square kilometers (or 6.2 million miles), Canada is the second largest country in the world by land mass.

    For a country that big, it’s no surprise that Canada is also an adventure rider’s paradise. When you think about it, only a small percentage of Canada has actually been developed – which leaves the rest of the land open to adventure touring (within reason, of course). 

    What makes Canada great from an adventure touring standpoint is that there are likely still routes that have yet to be discovered.

    However, we’ve put together a few here that will satisfy even the most discerning rider. In fact, this list only has three entries. 

    Why so few? Because, as you’ll see, each of these entries can be broken up in to sections, each providing a spectacular ride on its own. When put together, they make up a truly incredible ride.

    So, if you’re wondering where to go on an adventure ride in Canada, read on. 

    Trans Canada Adventure Trail 

    The Trans Canada Adventure Trail takes the already long Trans Canada Adventure Highway – which spans 5,000 miles and crosses all 10 Canadian provinces – and makes it even longer by nearly doubling it in length. 

    How? By avoiding paved roads and major cities whenever possible. Here you’ll find all kinds of terrain, which also means you’re in store for some epic riding and enjoying parts of Canada you won’t find in a guidebook.

    With that in mind, it’s worth pointing out that there will be times when you’ll be in desolate areas with few people. So keep fuel stops in mind and a tool kit handy, just in case. For the most part, however, you won’t be far from civilization. 

    The trail can be broken down into six sections which loosely take you through the six largest provinces from east to west. You can tackle individual sections of course, or you can take on the whole thing – be sure to budget enough time either way you choose, as the sights and sounds you’ll experience will be incredible.

    Ultimate Canada Route 

    If you want to stick to the west side of Canada, the Ultimate Canada Route packs in some epic riding over the course of about 1,600 miles.

    Vancouver is both your start and end point and along the way you’ll traverse parts of the Gold Rush trail and makes stops in Banff, Lake Louise, the Kamloops, the Rockies, and the Icefields Parkway.

    Like the Trans Canada Adventure Trail, the Ultimate Canada Route can be taken in all at once (budget about two weeks for that), or broken up into segments that range anywhere from 100 miles to nearly 300 miles.

    If you have to single out only one specific section to ride, then the route from Banff to Mount Robson would be it. It’s 235 miles and includes riding through the Icefields Parkway before heading up to Mount Robson – the highest point in the Canadian Rockies.

    Vancouver Island

    For the truly skilled and adventure-bound riders among us, Vancouver Island awaits. If you take a look at a map of Vancouver Island, you’ll notice it only has one main road, Highway 19.

    You’ll also notice it’s on the eastern edge of the island. This makes sense since most of the population lives on the eastern edge of the island, but it also begs the question: What’s over on the west side? 

    The answer is miles and miles of virtually untapped adventure riding opportunities. There are towns and villages on the west, but they are very small and have only the bare minimum when it comes to amenities. And even that might be a stretch.

    However, what these small villages and towns do have are seemingly endless amounts of dirt roads leading to them. Well, technically you’ll find both hard and loose dirt, along with gravel and black sand. Simply put, it’s paradise. 

    However, be forewarned. Western Vancouver Island is sparsely populated. Be prepared to fix your own motorcycle if something were to happen.

    It’s also wise to bring a spare jug of fuel because sometimes the gas stations in town will run out! It can be barren and desolate – and that’s what makes Vancouver Island paradise for the hardcore ADV rider.   

    If all you see are three destinations above, then you clearly haven’t explored those three destinations hard enough. Canada is full of excellent riding for the adventure touring rider, and between these three destinations you’re sure to find a part of the country that will truly take your breath away.

    Covering both of Canada’s coastlines, these trails should fill your adventure bucket and have you rushing to come back for more.

    Then again, as Vancouver Island demonstrates, there are still portions of the country open to further exploration by the adventure junkie among us. The north is calling, and it’s not for the faint of heart. Wherever you go, enjoy all the beauty Canada has to offer.

    Sources:

  • Like a Phoenix from the ashes….
    13 May 2022
    Jerry and Brendan in Patagonia on the First Compass Expeditions tour
    Finally – The news you have all been waiting for.

    On the 11th March 2020 the WHO declared Covid-19 a global pandemic and by June 23rd, we announced the closure of Compass Expeditions after 13 of the most incredible years. 

    Compass Expeditions took the very early decision to fully refund all deposits for all future tours, we knew this decision was akin to throwing ourselves onto the corporate sword and could have spelt the end of Compass Expeditions however, we felt it was our only option while we were still financial enough to do so. While some of our competitors mocked our “unbusinesslike” decision, we knew it was the ethical thing to do. The outpouring of support was stunning; we received endless emails, texts, and phone calls with some actually in tears at the news of our demise. We will never forget the words of encouragement and support that was shown to us, the Compass family, it was incredibly touching. 

    Fast forward to late 2020 and we were approached by two gentlemen whom we’ve had previous dealings with, expressing an interest in how they might reinvigorate Compass Expeditions. They wanted to both kickstart the business and continue our legacy, they loved the back story of how Compass began and the amazing Compass family that has evolved, believing that Compass was simply too good a company to be quietly consigned to the pages of motorcycle touring history.

    It’s now with the greatest of pleasure that we can announce that, like the legendary Phoenix, Compass Expeditions has arisen from the ashes and will once again offer world renowned, unique, exciting motorcycle tours across the globe. 

    We would like to introduce Ben Willox & Brent Thomas who have taken a financial interest in Compass Expeditions, thereby allowing us to restart the business and take it into the future. We are thrilled to have these guys join Compass as we know they have the same business ethos and ethics that we do. We’ve known Brent, in his capacity as owner of Bikes Abroad, for many years. Brent has dealt with many of our clients in the past, all of which have spoken extremely highly of the services provided. Whilst we’ve only met Ben more recently, we’ve quickly formed a wonderful relationship and know him to be a caring, considerate and decent person to bring into the Compass fold. It is important to note that both Mick & Jerry will still retain an interest and continue to drive Compass Expeditions. Alongside us will be Veronica and Craig. Obviously, we will not be offering any tours in 2021 so we’ll all be taking the time to refresh and reenergise our services offering with the intention of releasing a set of tour dates for 2022 in the very near future.  

    We are so looking forward to once again visiting the amazing places we once rode and we look forward to catching up with Isaac, the Vic Falls Hotel gardener in Zimbabwe; Baktygul, the gracious B&B owner in Kyrgyzstan and the effervescent Otgoo, the manageress of the ger camp at Khovsguul Nuur, Mongolia. The list of wonderful friends, peoples and experiences is endless. One thing remains certain however, despite a year of doom and gloom the world still remains an amazing place full of incredible people that will be desperate for us to return and return we will. 

    The ride is not over yet and the road as it turns out, wasn’t a dead end, we just couldn’t see the track for the trees!!

    We hope the Compass family will embrace and support us again as we start a new chapter!

    Mick Mcdonald.

    Welcome Ben Willox

    I am a family man with a lovely wife and 4 daughters. A business owner with an accounting and finance background, a kindred sense of adventure and a love of motor bikes that stems back to my early childhood and the XR 75 that was my pride and joy.

    Upon understanding the back story of Compass and after meeting Mick, Jerry, and Veronica it is impossible not to get caught up in the passion and purpose of what this company and its’ people are all about. I am honoured and excited to be able to help keep the Compass legacy alive and allow it to thrive into the future.I am very much looking forward to meeting as many members of the Compass family as I can on a Compass Expedition in 2022 and beyond.

    Ben Willox.

    We would like you to meet Brent Thomas

    Firstly, thanks so much to everyone for the warm welcome, I already feel like a part of the family! 

    Given I’m an enthusiastic traveller and a bit of geography nerd, it’s only natural to gravitate towards concepts like Compass Expeditions and I must admit that I really struggled with the idea of my friends at Compass closing their doors. I’m really pleased we’ve managed to put that idea behind us. 

    My professional background is in freight and project logistics which, once you peel back all of the layers and strange acronyms, is essentially all about efficiency. I’ve managed and overseen some very complex operations; everything from the decommissioning and movement of complete offshore oil rigs between the most extreme parts of the world to the smallest of eskies containing live heart tissues from regional abattoirs throughout Australia to medical theatres across the Americas (don’t ask). Having been in executive roles for about the last 15 years and spending a good deal of that time on the ground overseas expanding on relationships and networks, I’ve realised this is where I find the most enjoyment. 

    With that in mind, I look forward to meeting, working alongside and most importantly, riding next to you all!

    Brent Thomas.

    Thank you – keep well and stay tuned.
    Compass Expeditions and staff want to, once again thank all of you, our Compass family, for your wonderful support during these challenging times and for the ongoing trust shown to us every time you chose to travel with Compass Expeditions.

    We will have further updates coming out to you via email very soon. 

    In the meantime, make sure that you follow us on Facebook , for all of the Compass Expeditions news as it happens.

    Please, stay safe, practice good hygiene and social distancing to ensure that we keep this epidemic  in-check and that we can hit the road again with you soon.

    Compass Expeditions.

    The post Like a Phoenix from the ashes…. appeared first on Compass Expeditions Motorcycle Tours and Rentals.

  • The Ross McKeand Memorial ride and reunion event – Jindabyne – March 2020
    13 May 2022

    By Duncan Bennett.

    Rydges Resort, scene of the 2020 Compass Expeditions Reunion. After an unpack, it was off to the bar to greet old mates and meet other Compass ride veterans.  This event attracts people from far and wide so there are about as many boring moments as toilet paper rolls in the local Woollies. A wander up the road for excellent pizza and the usual endless accompanying hilarity, and it was time for bed.

    Jindabyne International Women’s Day rider’s line-up, Russell keeping the media out

    Day 6 had been a source of anticipation and worry for a few months. We’d been asked by Craig Jackson of Compass to give a presentation on our riding travels at the reunion dinner. Having first ascertained that Craig hadn’t been spotted on a Harley and rightfully sacked by Compass and was seeking some extreme vengeance, or was emailing from his new asylum cell, we’d dangerously said yes. Fortunately for the crowd, we weren’t the headline act as this is rightfully reserved for someone who’s done something way out of the ordinary. So after a very good reunion lunch and reunioning with more old friends and meeting lots of people, the normal options of a dirt ride or road ride were chosen by the gathered mob. The headline act did the dirt ride – on a Triumph Thruxton café racer mind you – demonstrating her capabilities as a rider. Heather Ellis is the embodiment of a freak adventure rider, she rode up Africa by herself in the 1990’s before the invention of instant communications and rode through countries like the DRC at a time when people could still just disappear out there. She’s written a couple of great books about the Africa ride and her return to Australia via the endless part of Asia including Russia. It was a real honour for us to be the supporting act to Heather, and it earned us a free glass of red from Compass founder Mick McDonald, probably because we knew secrets about him but had only broadly hinted at them.

    Craig finishing his introduction and happily remembering he could always activate the fire alarm

    Day 7 to Day 10 followed the Compass Reunion routine, riding out either with the Dirt People who took pleasure in adventure motorcycling, or with the Café Latté Parté who had motorcycles but for whom the primary pleasure was finding ridiculously expensive coffee. To spread the benefits to burned out and now saturated towns we were taken to Batemans Bay for one night, then Mallacoota in Victoria for another night before returning to wrap things up in Jindabyne.

    The power of expensive coffee; Compass founder Mick McDonald in support vehicle, before and after

    As anyone with even the most rudimentary knowledge of geology will tell you, the Palaeozoic Era sediments with Ordovician Flysch sequences and interspersed Berridale and Bega Batholith granitoid intrusion events create an ideal environment on the Monaro Plains for adventure riding. We’re not geologists but the wide-open treeless plains with relatively straight roads and long lines of sight to spot any ADHD cows, coupled with the granite sand road surfaces allow for some great fast and fun rides. The propensity – meaning an inclination or natural tendency to attempt drifties – out there is insatiable.

    How’s that for geology!?!

    Down in the very south-east of NSW and into Victoria the hilly logging country running down to the coast provides a few more challenges, but only the main roads had been re-opened after the bushfires and it was often a “ride in and see” experience. Our longest failed “ride in and see” occurred on the Cooma – Braidwood road on the way to Batemans Bay when we managed to get 35km up the dirt past Numeralla before not only was there an oft-ignored road closed sign, but actual road workers who said no for good reason. Full retreat was required, and a series of farm roads were travelled at variable pace, including getting stuck for a while behind an uncaring grader driver who already had several destroyed adventure bike carcasses tangled in his blade, to eventually reach Braidwood way behind Café Latté Parté. Most of the riding wasn’t terribly technical, and the burned-out undergrowth allowed for some great vision from the hills which made it very enjoyable. 

    Gum tree heaven – competition burned out, and now wet

    One section on the last day inspired calls to health insurance providers, last minute updates to wills, and reciting of Scripture. Timbillica Road and following logging tracks through valley and hill country near the border was designed to cut the corner off between the Princes Highway and the fabulous Imlay Road. Craig was later to say; “I don’t remember it being that tricky while seated in the 4WD with the independent suspension, wide off-road tyres, windows up, perfect air-conditioned temperature, and awesome tunes lined up on the Playlist”. The road surface itself wasn’t that bad, a bit rutted in the low sections, but the creeks were more like very deep table drains and to prevent wash-out and possible inconvenience to stable vehicles with 4 large patches of contact with the earth, large basalt clinker the size of 6-egg cartons had been used as rough sheeting. The first one was only about 300m off the highway, I was following Craig closely, and I saw him slow then briefly disappear before popping up on the other side. As I was close, I had to stop, and this was a bit like a brief delay being called as you lie under the guillotine; relaxed is a hard state to achieve. The difficulty appeared to be that the sheeting had not been packed into smooth single rut lines but was cut with nasty ridges at all angles. Sheeting myself, is what I should do on these roads in future I thought as I rode into the maw. As always on these types of crossings, momentum is a friend as the physics of a fast moving yet quivering mass is overwhelming, and even though the totally wrong line was taken over the worst bits I popped up on the other side with physiology and reputation undamaged.

    Smiling hysterically wards off concerns of adventure riding mortality

    A few more of the same nature were crossed before an extremely welcome coffee stop on the intersection with Imlay Road provided an opportunity to sponge up the excess terror sweat and offer up empty muesli bar wrappers to the gods of practice and luck. Hitting the bitumen, the Imlay Road confirmed its reputation as one of the best engineered roads in Australia – the speed can be set at around 100±5kmh (plus preferably) and the relentless sweeping bends just soaked up while keeping a weather eye on the horizon for log trucks. A Nimmitabel lunch rounded off the reunion on-road luncheons, before what was some of the best dirt roads, I’ve ever experienced at the top of the Monaro Plains past the Boco Rock Wind Farm and into Dalgety. One final ride past a dead wombat with a spray-painted red cross on it – presumably the work experience kid on the Council gang is told where to pick them up after they’ve had a chance to “mature” – on the Jindabyne Dam wall and we were back to Rydges Resort.

    If you would like to read Cindy and Duncan’s full ride report it can be found on here at The Travelling Bennetts blog page: https://travellingbennetts.wordpress.com/

    https://travellingbennetts.wordpress.com/2020/04/05/south-by-south-west-part-1-the-ties-that-jindabyne/

    If you would like to take part in the 2021 Compass Expeditions Reunion ride then email your interest to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to be notified when the dates and details are released.

    The post The Ross McKeand Memorial ride and reunion event – Jindabyne – March 2020 appeared first on Compass Expeditions Motorcycle Tours and Rentals.

  • Compass Expeditions – COVID-19 Update.
    13 May 2022

    Dear Valued Customers,

    Whoever said it would be problematic to run an international tour company was spot on but who would have ever planned for something like COVID 19?  These are clearly testing times for the global community, and especially so for small businesses with the travel industry being particularly hard hit.

    It was around 13 years ago that the idea for Compass Expeditions was spawned around a dining room table in Clifton Hill, Victoria.  Mick, Jerry, Brendan and Ryan had all met while leading tours for other companies through Europe, Africa and South America.  Not only did they all become friends, they each shared a love of travel and dedication to ensuring their passengers enjoyed a holiday of a lifetime.

    While collecting visas, riding across vast mountains, empty steppe and yawning valleys, wandering historic plazas and tasting foreign beers were all fun, what really motivated us was providing our clients a truly memorable and life changing experience.  That was the motivation in establishing Compass Expeditions and it remains our focus today.

    The last weeks have been difficult for Compass Expeditions having to face its corporate mortality.  We have had to cancel all of our tours up until August with possibly more to come if travel restrictions remain in place.

    Unlike the vast majority of other travel and tour companies, upon cancelling our tours, we have ensured all our clients have received a FULL REFUND of monies paid, as opposed to only offering clients to transfer their trip to next year and if you can’t or had other prearranged plans, bad luck!  We understand that in these very uncertain times people would sooner have their deposits back in their pocket, not ours. We made a conscious decision not to hide behind our terms and conditions and force majeure clauses to retain funds or deposits.

    Our reputation as a company that places our clients first and foremost was far too important to us.  This of course has placed us in a vulnerable financial situation given the global uncertainty as to when normal travel will be able to resume.  We have had to put off some staff which has been, frankly, heartbreaking. We are proud to be one of, if not the only, tour company to offer full refunds even if it has crippled us financially, we HOPE people will appreciate our integrity and willingness to do all we can as we are aware everyone is suffering, we hope people will choose to once again travel with us when the world is open for business again.

    However, rather than closing the doors we have made the bold, and we hope not foolish decision, to continue operations, all be it with a skeleton staff for the next few months.  We intend to streamline our expenses, maintain our office and our corporate presence and plan for trips in 2021 and beyond. In the spirit of streamlining, Mick has already returned to driving trucks to stay financially viable. Now he always loved trucks, but this was certainly not his plan for 2020!

    We have been touched by the extreme generosity of clients offering to give us money to see us through, others booking tours for next year and the year after and paying deposits now, to help us out, clients calling the office to ask if we are OK and welcome words of comfort and assurances that they will rebook. We are ALL going through an unprecedented hardship currently and the outpouring of support to us, a company, has vindicated our decision to carry on, we really do have a “compass family” and we are so proud of our small company and the amazing clients (friends) we have.

    Please be assured all deposits paid for any future trips are 100% fully refundable, we WILL NOT be using future trip deposits to keep the doors open. This is more than an empty promise, it is a guarantee, and our recent return of all payments while all around us service providers REFUSED to refund, stands testament to our word.

    This will only work with the continued support of our clients.  Those whose trips have been cancelled in 2020 are strongly encouraged to rebook for 2021. Those considering a motorbike tour, we ask you to choose to travel with Compass Expeditions. 

    Compass has always kept its clients as our focus and had their best interests at heart.  Our decisions have always been based upon what our clients would enjoy, what would create a lasting memory and what destination would provide a fantastic experience and an anecdote at a dinner party or a tale to a friend or family member.

    Our annual client get-togethers have been a tangible example of how we thank our guests while also seeking feedback on destinations and itineraries.  It is you, our riders, that we seek support from now.  Once a vaccine is found, once planes are flying, once borders have reopened, come travel with us and book your 2021 tour.

    Just think, in 12 months’ time you could be riding a motorcycle up the Dalton Highway to Prudhoe Bay,  Alaska, flanked by glaciers and wildlife, you could be photographing lions in the Etosha National Park in Namibia, you could be visiting the majestic Pyramids of Giza, standing atop soaring 5000m snow-capped peak in Kyrgyzstan, rolling across the vast Mongolian hills, trekking the Moreno Glacier in Patagonia or wandering the ancient souks of Marrakesh.

    If these last weeks have taught us anything, it is that life can change on a dime – so embrace it, not from the couch while watching Discovery channel, but from the seat of a motorbike. The world really is vast and wonderful, come travel it with Mick, Jerry, Brendan and Ryan!

    Here is what one client has said about how we have managed the refunds:

     “I again take this opportunity to thank Compass Expeditions for the honourable way they have handled what is a devastating occurrence to their business and no doubt considerable personal impact. The personal and business integrity shown is a compass heading for Australian businesses. We should all applaud and support other businesses that follow that heading.”

    Stay Safe,Warm Regards,

    Mick, Jerry, Veronica, Ryan, Brendan and the Compass Crew.

    The post Compass Expeditions – COVID-19 Update. appeared first on Compass Expeditions Motorcycle Tours and Rentals.

  • Asian Overland 2020 Road Report – Week #5 – Back into Thailand
    13 May 2022

    By Jerry Cook

    I don’t think anyone in the group really was ready to leave Myanmar.  We were enjoying this country immensely.  After 11 days, with the last few having been some of the best riding of the trip so far, it was time to cross the Mai Sai border and enter the infamous Golden Triangle region of Northern Thailand.  This is the area where the borders of Thailand, Laos, and Myanmar meet at the Ruak and Mekong rivers.  The Golden Triangle has been one of the largest opium-producing areas of the world, since the 1950s.

    We said goodbye to our Myanmar local guide Tun Tun and driver, Thanh Thanh.  These guys did a fantastic job of showing us through their country, where permits and authorizations are essential, and our every movement recorded with the local police.  There was a lot of behind the scenes organising done and these guys and the local agency did a first-class job to make our visit smooth and memorable. I look forward to returning and I am sure others in the group will be back also, it was that great.

    Crossing the border, there was a noticeable change in the road conditions.  We were now on a nice smooth asphalt surface with no potholes or random traffic hazards.  My favourite hazards in Myanmar was the loose gravel and sand on the mountain roads and the unpredictability of the drivers.  Thailand has some fantastic roads and we will experience them over the next few days as we ride the Mae Hong Son loop out of Chiang Mai. 

    It was about an hour from the border to our hotel in the Golden Triangle and we had a delicious lunch overlooking the Mekong River (and enjoyed some real coffee) before some of us walked to the Opium museum in town.  The museum was fascinating and we learnt about Opium production and its history. If you are wondering, there were no free samples.

    The spread of Covid-19 had intensified and for some of the riders in the group plans were in place to return home from Chiang Mai.  With the border to Laos closed our itinerary options were limited.  Heavy travel restrictions were in place with countries around the South East Asia and the world closing their borders, so it was inevitable that our trip was coming to an end.

    Hardeo, Lolita, Ian and Eric left us in Chiang Mai and their bikes were transported to a warehouse just outside of Bangkok where we had them shipped back to Australia from.  

    The Mae Hong Son loop has to be one of Thailand’s best motorcycle road rides.   We enjoyed this three day circuit on incredible motorcycle roads with an impressive 1864 bends and endless series of switchbacks across mountains ranges, we rode to the country’s highest point of Doi Inthanon at 2,565mt where we enjoyed clear skies and cool conditions and we visited the remote Karen hill tribes with its unique longneck women who wear up to 22 brass rings around their necks.  We were well off the tourist trail and with a low number of tourists anyway, it seemed we were some of the only few travelling and staying in the hotels and dining in whatever restaurants had remained open.   It was surreal.

    Back in Chiang Mai it was strange to wander the old town to see businesses closed and little traffic on the street.  Peter who has been travelling in the support vehicle with Bayne since breaking his collar bone two weeks ago in Myanmar decided it was time for him to head home and he reserved a flight to Brisbane.  Our group size has almost halved, but we will ride on!

    The itinerary had us to continue to Khao Kho. It was a long but enjoyable ride to the impressive Blue Sky Hotel, a quaint, garden resort.  The accommodation on the expedition has been top notch, and this was no exception.  Khao Kho was part of our original itinerary which had us heading towards Laos.  Now, rather than continuing east, we will head south via the Khao Yai National Park to Pattaya Beach (only 1.5 hrs from Bangkok). Whilst we are trying to enjoy what was left of the expedition, there is a feeling of anxiety.  The priority for riders has been to reserve a flight out of Thailand and get home quickly and directly as possible.  With more international flights being cancelled daily and some airports such as Singapore closing for transit passengers, it has been a scramble and a difficult task to book a flight.

    Bayne and I were the last on the ground in Thailand, being sure the 11 bikes and support van were loaded into shipping containers to head to Melbourne.

    When we commenced this expedition in Singapore just under 6 weeks ago, entering China was a long shot but we were still hopeful.  Never in my wildest dreams would I have thought the world would be in lockdown from a pandemic and I would be returning home for two weeks of self-isolation with our business on the rocks. 

    I would like to thank all of our expedition participants, well done to you for undertaking this epic journey and persevering in good spirits under stressful circumstances. I would also like to thank all of our  local guides, especially our Thai guide, Bombae, our shippers and the Compass office staff for their support and assistance in wrapping up the logistics for the tour as efficiently as possible.

    We are determined to get through Covid-19, survive the tough economic times ahead and with the support of our loyal customers we will be back, riding to these wonderful destinations and exploring more of the world on two wheels with you. Stay safe everyone and let’s take care of each other through these hard times ahead. 

    For ore information regarding the Asian Overland Expedition please visit our web page at: http://www.compassexpeditions.com/tours/asian-overland/

    http://www.compassexpeditions.com/tours/asian-overland/

    We are also accepting bookings on our other major Expeditions for 2021 and 2022, Click below to find out more:

    http://www.compassexpeditions.com/tours/cape-town-to-cairo/
    http://www.compassexpeditions.com/tours/ultimate-south-america/
    http://www.compassexpeditions.com/tours/the-road-of-bones-london-to-magadan-4/

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  • Asian Overland 2020 Road Report – Week #4 – More Myanmar
    13 May 2022

    By Jerry Cook

    Prior to the expedition, nobody in the group really knew what to expect of Myanmar. It was a bit of an unknown.   Tourism has only been encouraged by their government since 1992 and really hadn’t opened up to travellers until the general elections in 2010 when a civilian government was installed.  It’s not a destination high on travellers’ bucket lists due to its turbulent history, having been involved in one of the world’s longest-running ongoing civil wars. 

    For our group of adventure motorcyclists, it really has been a highlight of the trip so far and a country that we have enjoyed immensely. We all have a strong desire to return to Myanmar in the future.   

    Our local guide Tun Tun’s passion for tourism, love for his country and willingness to share his knowledge of the culture and religion (Buddhism) really added to our experience.

    Several of the riders in the group have spent extensive time in South East Asia and were really impressed by Myanmar – The diversity of the country is so different to that of its neighbours and also the friendliness, kindness and warmth of the people, not to forget some incredible and unique riding conditions and experiences were unforgettable.  

    For sure, these have been some of the best ride days of my life!  

    If you enjoy travelling in Asia and would like to see something quite different in a safe and super friendly country, that is well off the beaten tourist trail, Myanmar is a must-see destination.

    Our second week in Myanmar saw us visiting the incredible UNESCO world heritage site at Bagan. With over 4,000 Buddhist temples (pagodas) from the 12th & 13th Century AD, it is a sight to be seen, some of our group choosing to do so by taking the spectacular early morning hot air balloon ride.  

    We had a long-boat trip to explore Inle Lake, a freshwater lake located in the troubled Shan State of Myanmar.  From the moment we boarded a traditional long-boat, from the hotel jetty, we knew we were in for a treat.  It was another blue-sky day and the calmness of the lake made for a smooth journey.  Any waves or chop in this water and these long boats would be in a bit of trouble.   

    Inle Lake is where the local (Intha) fisherman row canoes with one leg, there are floating vegetable and herb gardens and wooden homes perch above the water on rickety stilts.  Although Inle Lake is one of Myanmar’s most visited sites, at our “Amazing Hotel”, there was only a handful of other tourists.  It is pleasant to visit a tourist destination such as this and not be smothered by other travellers and touts working on the hard sell.   Not once in Myanmar have I been asked for money or felt intimidated by a salesperson. 

    We were now deep in the Shan State of Myanmar which holds the largest minority group in the country.  The food, the people and the culture are quite different.   

    These roads in this region have only recently been opened to foreigners and we had our usual tourist police escort in and out of the city limits.  

    It was final days in Myanmar where the riding became really special.  Endless twisties, switchbacks and super steep inclines with blind corners kept us all alert. There is also the ongoing roadworks and constructions but when these roads are finished, it’s going to be one incredible road, I must come back and ride it again!   

    Once we arrived at the Famous Hotel in Kengtung, we took some photos with the tourist police, enjoyed the regular welcome drink and cool face towel to clean the dirt from our faces and we settled in for the evening.  

    Tomorrow we return to Thailand via the infamous Golden Triangle.  

    Covid19 is taking a grip on the world and the continuation of our expedition is looking grim due to the closure of the Laos border with Thailand.  

    However, we still have some great roads ahead of us as we head to Chiang Mai and ride the Mae Hong Son loop.  

    With the situation escalating back home and flight restrictions coming into place some of the riders are contemplating leaving the trip in a few days to be able to return home safely.  We are not ready to finish this expedition but Covid19 has turned to a pandemic and the world will be in lock down soon.  

    We will enjoy what time we have remaining of the expedition and do all we can to stay safe.

    For ore information regarding the Asian Overland Expedition please visit our web page at: http://www.compassexpeditions.com/tours/asian-overland/

    We are also accepting bookings on our other major Expeditions for 2021 and 2022, Click below to find out more:

    The post Asian Overland 2020 Road Report – Week #4 – More Myanmar appeared first on Compass Expeditions Motorcycle Tours and Rentals.

  • The Compass Expeditions 2020 Tour Catalogue
    13 May 2022

    Where would you like to ride?

    For further information on all Compass Expeditions tours or Major Expeditions please visit us at:

    http://www.compassexpeditions.com/

    Click below to view our catalogue of tours.

    The post The Compass Expeditions 2020 Tour Catalogue appeared first on Compass Expeditions Motorcycle Tours and Rentals.

  • Asian Overland 2020 Road Report – Week #3 – Myanmar – “Mingalabar” (Hello)
    13 May 2022

    By Jerry Cook

    Arriving at the Thailand / Myanmar border, I was excited to bring the group into the fourth country of the Asian Overland expedition.  There is a tangible excitement to brining a motorcycle tour group into a new country and the unknown adventures that lay ahead.   The border procedures were surprisingly efficient, thanks to the help of our local guides.  Border officials were curious about our big bikes – something they don’t see every day, taking photos with the group and welcoming us to their country.  One thing that stood out immediately was the super friendly vibe of the people.  It was clear that Myanmar is not a country overrun by tourists and the locals are extremely curious and amazed at us riding motorcycles through their country.  I haven’t seen another big bike on the roads here.  

    Our local guides who will be with us for the next 11 days are Tun Tun, Zun-Hi and driver Thanh, these guys were the ones that accompanied Mick and Sarah on the reccy trip last year so it was reassuring to be in their company and have their local knowledge and expertise. We have also had Crystal with us for the last few days.  Crystal works in the tour agency that has facilitated our permits and logistics for the tour and she is using the opportunity to escape the office and join us on the road for a while. One can’t blame her, everyone loves a road trip and planning the visit of a motorcycle tour group is not part of her normal day to day work.  With four fixers / local guides currently on tour with us, Bayne and I are blessed, and the group is definitely in good hands!  We also have local tourist police who escort us in and out of the big cities. They too want to make sure we are safe and arrive to our destination. At no time have we felt unsafe, it’s the complete opposite and upon arrival its handshakes and photos with them. I really feel an overwhelming sense of kindness from everyone we meet.

    Entering Myanmar and judging by the change in the roads (a big deterioration to that of Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand) I realised very quickly that the riding was going to be challenging with road conditions that many of us are not accustomed to.   The temperatures and humidity have also increased, reaching slaughterhouse.  Personally, I am drinking 4-5 litres of water a day, having a camel back is essential in these conditions to avoid dehydration and fatigue.  

    Drivers of motorcycles (mostly small bikes and scooters all around 100cc), cars, busses, trucks, trishaws, tricycles, horse and carts not to mention the roadside animals – dogs, cows, chickens and pigs all behave in a completely random manner. Sometimes the animals are easier to judge than the drivers!  There are also small trucks fitted out with exposed tractor engines used for transporting produce and people, most of who are smiling and waving at us as we pass, which all adds to the distractions.

    Within 30 minutes of leaving the border we saw an overturned truck. The driver had miscalculated the weight of his load and the steepness of the decline (or lack of braking ability) and had slammed into the side of a ravine. The result being sacks all over the road and a crushed drivers cab. The driver was ok, but it was a reminder for us to take it easy.

    Next it was 40 or so kms of interesting road works through a dusty red clay where there seemed to be total anarchy as we manoeuvred around detours and heavy vehicles whilst teams of locals including young ladies, worked on repaving this section. I am sure these are the same roadworks Mick and Sarah experienced a year before, and who knows how long they have been in progress. This means we move along at a slow pace in hot conditions and our once clean riding gear and now dusty faces look like we have just completed an Australian outback ride. Unfortunately, we had our first incident of the tour with Peter, a veteran overland motorcyclist, going down in a rutted-out section of roadworks. Luckily it was very close to a hospital where Peter was examined. Sadly, the results showed a broken collar bone which meant the end of his riding for the remainder of the expedition.  His V Strom was loaded onto the back of our support vehicle and we pushed on to our first overnight stop at Mawlamyine.  Following some beers and an early dinner our first day in Myanmar was complete. I must add that beer, fuel, food (and pretty much everything for that matter) in Myanmar is super cheap, which is always a bonus for the international adventurer.

    Our next destination was Bago, where we had a free day to have a city tour of Yangon which is formally known as Rangoon and is Myanmar’s largest city; home to what is Myanmar’s most significant Buddhist monument – the Shwedagon Pagoda. A pagoda is a religious, gold domed temple common with the Buddhist religion and these pagodas are everywhere!  Shwedagon is a truly impressive site and nothing like any of our group has seen before in their extensive travels.  Full of devout followers of Buddhism who come to show their faith, we tourists were certainly in the minority and it was not a problem to take photos. Quite often It was the locals asking to take photos of us.

    We had a longer ride day to Bago but with the scenery ever changing the riding is far from dull.  Within a 50km stretch we were riding through rice fields then arid landscapes, passing hundreds of pagodas and buddha statues.  Our riding is often on single lane secondary roads through towns where the drivers are performing erratic manoeuvres, quite often pulling out in front of you. For the locals using side and rear-view mirrors are optional.  (However horns are mandatory). Pedestrians and animals are also doing their best to keep us alert. Emergency braking is a part of the excitement.

    Our first week In Myanmar has been wonderful. I can’t emphasise enough the beauty and kindness of the local people.  The children are quite adorable wearing Thanaka (a yellowish-white cosmetic paste made from ground bark which is applied to the face). It’s something totally unique from anywhere I have travelled.  We are very excited for what our second week in this amazing country will bring!!

    Jerry Cook


    For ore information regarding the Asian Overland Expedition please visit our web page at: http://www.compassexpeditions.com/tours/asian-overland/

    We are also accepting bookings on our other major Expeditions for 2021 and 2022, Click below to find out more:

    The post Asian Overland 2020 Road Report – Week #3 – Myanmar – “Mingalabar” (Hello) appeared first on Compass Expeditions Motorcycle Tours and Rentals.

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