Fitness

Fitness Blogs

26 May 2022

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  • BODi Special Event Classes for June
    26 May 2022

    Every month, BODi — Beachbody On Demand Interactive — features live Special Event Classes with different themes led by your favorite Beachbody Super Trainers and instructors.

    This month, you can get your workout groove on with Elise Joan, Jericho McMatthews, Jared Sklar, Jennifer Jacobs, and more!

    So, don’t miss out: Mark your calendars, round up your BODi Squad, and start sweating!

    Pro tip: Come back next month and find out what new classes we have in store.

    June Featured Live Classes

    Dance Cardio with Jenny Jaucian, June 6 at 2PM ET / 11AM PT

    #MBF Core Circuit with Megan Davies, June 6 at 5PM ET / 2PM PT

    FIRE AND FLOW + Talk Back with Elise and Jericho, June 8 at 1PM ET / 10AM PT

    Job 1 Start Strong with Jennifer Jacobs, June 13 at 5PM ET / 2PM PT

    FIRE AND FLOW Ride with Elise and Jericho, June 17 at 1PM ET / 10AM PT

    Dance Cardio with Jenn Padilla, June 29 at 3PM ET / 12PM PT

    Pride Rides

    Pride Ride: Love is Love with Jared Sklar, June 3 at 1PM ET / 10AM PT

    Pride Ride: Just be You! with Eric Thomson, June 10 at 3PM ET / 12pm PT

    Pride Ride: Love Yourself with Jenny Jaucian, June 16 at 1PM ET / 10AM PT

    Pride Ride: Choose Love with Taliah Mekki, June 22 at 1PM ET / 10AM PT

    The post BODi Special Event Classes for June appeared first on Rewop.

  • 2022 World’s Strongest Man Da …
    26 May 2022

    Amidst ongoing triple-digit temperatures in Sacramento, CA, the competitive heat of the 2022 World’s Strongest Man (WSM) continues to charge along. 

    On Day 1, the 30-person roster of elite strongmen attempted the Loading Race and Deadlift Ladder during the Qualifying Round. On Wednesday, May 25, 2022 — during the second day of the Qualifying Round — the remaining competitors had the task of pulling a Volkswagen Bug in the Car Walk and using their overhead strength to try and thrive in the Log Lift. 

    The ensuing results were terrific to watch as the competition builds toward the weekend’s Finals. Here’s where the overall leaderboard stands after Day 2 of the 2022 WSM, along with a short recap of the athletes’ performances in both events. 

    2022 WSM Leaderboard — Day 2
    Rank Name Points
    Group 1
    1 Tom Stoltman — United Kingdom 24
    2 Kevin Faires — USA 18
    3 Gabriel Rheaume — Canada 16
    4 Aivars Smaukstelis — Latvia 13
    5 Andy Black — United Kingdom 7
    6 Manuel Angulo — Chile 3
    Group 2
    1 Mitchell Hooper — Canada 22.5
    2 Bobby Thompson — USA 17
    3 Brian Shaw — USA 13.5
    4 Gabriel Pena — Mexico 11
    5 Konstantine Janashia — Georgia 10
    6 Mark Felix — Canada 9
    Group 3
    1 Oleksii Novikov — Ukraine 21.5
    2 Adam Bishop — United Kingdom 16
    3 Trey Mitchell — USA 15.5
    4 Rob Kearney — USA 14
    5 Grzegorz Szymanski — Poland 9
    6 Mika Törrö — Finland 8
    Group 4
    1 Martins Licis — USA 21.5
    2 Maxime Boudreault — Canada 17
    3 Pavlo Kordiyaka — Ukraine 16.5
    4 Gavin Bilton — United Kingdom 15
    5 Nedžmin Ambešković — Bosnia and Herzegovina 6
    6 Shane Flowers — United Kingdom (withdrawn) 6
    Group 5
    1 Luke Stoltman — United Kingdom 23
    2 Eythor Ingolfsson Melsted — Iceland 16
    3 Jean-Stephen Coraboeuf — France 15
    4 Kelvin De Ruiter — Netherlands 11
    5 Evan Singleton — USA 9.5
    6 Kim Ujarak Lorentzen — Greenland 9
    2022 WSM Day 2

    Wednesday was the perfect time to unveil the Car Walk and Log Lift — two classic WSM events. Here’s how the competitors fared, and what it might mean for some of them moving forward. 

    Car Walk Results

    The athletes stepped inside a roofless, hollowed-out car constructed around a Yoke bar. For this event, they had to carry the 430-kilogram (950-pound) vehicle 20 meters (66 feet) as fast as they could. 

    With a 9.86-second run, Evan Singleton had the fastest time of all competitors on the Car Walk. Meanwhile, Rob Kearney turned in a blazing 11.63-second finish, and newcomer Mitchell Hooper blitzed the event in 11.64 seconds to continue his fantastic WSM debut. 

    Note: Unfortunately, Shane Flowers withdrew due to an apparent foot or ankle injury sustained during the Loading Race on Day 1. While he showed the grit of a champion in completing yesterday’s Deadlift Ladder as well, he was unable to continue competing on Day 2 and has withdrawn from his first appearance at the WSM.

    Group 1
    1. Tom Stoltman — 0:14.65s
    2. Gabriel Rhéaume — 0:16.44s
    3. Kevin Faires — 0:19.32s
    4. Aivars Šmaukstelis — 0:19.91s
    5. Andy Black — 0:32.71s
    6. Manuel Angulo — 1:00.00s
    Group 2
    1. Mitchell Hooper — 0:11.64s
    2. Mark Felix — 0:13.96s
    3. Bobby Thompson — 0:16.05s
    4. Konstantine Janashia — 0:18.16s
    5. Brian Shaw — 0:19.97s
    6. Gabriel Peña — 18.90m (Did not finish course)
    Group 3
    1. Rob Kearney — 0:11.63s
    2. Grzegorz Szymanski — 0:14.26s
    3. Oleksii Novikov — 0:15.23s
    4. Trey Mitchell — 0:19.24s
    5. Adam Bishop — 0:23.38s
    6. Mika Törrö — 9.50m (Did not finish course)
    Group 4
    1. Pavlo Kordiyaka — 0:12.92s
    2. Martins Licis — 0:18.93s
    3. Gavin Bilton — 0:23.67s
    4. Maxime Boudreault — 0:49.28s
    5. Nedžmin Ambešković — 13.60m (Did not finish course)
    6. Shane Flowers — Withdrawn
    Group 5
    1. Evan Singleton — 0:09.86s
    2. Luke Stoltman — 0:16.65s
    3. Eythor Ingolfsson Melsted — 0:29.07s
    4. Jean-Stephen Coraboeuf — 0:41.34s
    5. Kelvin De Ruiter — 1:00.00s
    6. Kim Ujarak — 11.40m (Did not finish course)
    Log Lift Results

    The Log Lift made its first appearance during the 1980 WSM contest. In this year’s event, competitors had to lift the 145-kilogram (320-pound) log from the ground to an overhead position for as many reps as possible within a 75-second time limit.

    As the temperature got to 100-plus degrees, the log itself took on heat. It is here where holding the weight for the duration was a challenge for many of the competitors. Event organizers had been keeping the log covered in an attempt to provide shade and make the event the usual test of strength rather than pain tolerance.

    Maxime Boudreault and Luke Stoltman tied for the best finish on the Log Lift by pressing 10 reps. Oleksii Novikov, Trey Mitchell, Martin Licis, and Pavlo Kordiyaka weren’t far behind with nine reps each. 

    Group 1
    1. Tom Stoltman — 8 reps
    2. Kevin Faires — 7 reps
    3. Gabriel Rhéaume — 6 rep
    4. Aivars Šmaukstelis — 4 reps
    5. Andy Black — No reps
    6. Manuel Angulo — No reps
    Group 2
    1. Bobby Thompson — 8 reps
    2. Mitchell Hooper — 7 reps
    3. Brian Shaw — 7 reps
    4. Konstantine Janashia — 5 reps
    5. Gabriel Peña — 1 rep
    6. Mark Felix — No reps
    Group 3
    1. Oleksii Novikov — 9 reps
    2. Trey Mitchell — 9 reps
    3. Adam Bishop — 7 reps
    4. Rob Kearney — 6 reps
    5. Grzegorz Szymanski — 3 reps
    6. Mika Törrö — 2 reps
    Group 4
    1. Maxime Boudreault — 10 reps
    2. Martins Licis — 9 reps
    3. Pavlo Kordiyaka — 9 reps
    4. Gavin Bilton — 7 reps
    5. Nedžmin Ambešković — 2 reps
    6. Shane Flowers — Withdrawn
    Group 5
    1. Luke Stoltman — 10 reps
    2. Eythor Ingolfsson Melsted — 8 reps
    3. Jean-Stephen Coraboeuf — 7 reps
    4. Kim Ujarak — 6 reps
    5. Kelvin De Ruiter — 1 rep
    6. Evan Singleton — 1 rep
    Day 3 Is Next

    As the competition inches closer to the weekend’s Finals, the intensity will likely only increase. With clarity in some groups already carved out, the final day of qualifying on Thursday should make for a tight finish. Those on the borderline still trying to qualify will need every point they can get.

    On Day 3, all of the athletes will have to hold a wrecking ball as long as possible in the Wrecking Ball Hold. Then, this year’s WSM will see the first appearance of the Atlas Stones in the Stone-Off as the athletes battle for the last spots in the Finals. 

    A clutch performance or two from some of the sport’s top contenders potentially awaits. 

    Featured image: Joe Martinez/World’s Strongest Man

    The post 2022 World’s Strongest Man Da … appeared first on Rewop.

  • How To Take Care of Your Body After Surgery
    26 May 2022

    Following abdominoplasty, taking care of your body is integral to your recovery. Since tummy tucks are surgical procedures, you will spend between four to six weeks in full recovery mode. You probably already know the importance of bed rest, but beyond this measure, what exactly should you be doing to care for your body after surgery? Read on and find out!

    Make Plans For Resting

    Since your doctor will advise you to limit your movement for a few weeks as your body heals, you’ll want to get everyone on board who needs to be involved with your recovery. Get your childcare, pet care, housekeeping, and other responsibilities you typically manage cared for by those you trust. Additionally, inform your employer that you will be on bed rest for a few weeks as you recover. 

    Try to take care of these daily tasks before surgery so nothing is left to the last minute, and everyone can feel prepared. Your tummy tuck post op recovery time is critical to maintaining results and healing as quickly as possible. Prioritize this time for yourself. 

    Eat Healthy Foods

    If you intend to optimize your results, you must stick to a healthy diet, especially as your body is healing. You can support your results more effectively by eating foods that do not promote bloating, indigestion, or stomach upsets. 

    Since you’ll be sedentary for a few weeks, do your best to select foods that will be easier to digest. Soups, stews, hot teas, and health shakes are ideal options as you recover. Be sure to avoid excessive salt and don’t drink alcohol during this time. 

    Wait For Exercise

    You should not take up your regular exercise routine until your doctor clears it. Typically, patients can return to their regular workouts once six weeks have passed since surgery. 

    Still, everyone is different, and depending on where your body is with the healing process, the time may vary. Be patient with the process and know that building resiliency as you heal is worth the wait. You’ll end up stronger and more capable of doing those intense exercises once your body has had the time it needs to fully heal. 

    Minimize Your Stress

    Stress wreaks havoc on the mind and the body. To not make the physical discomfort of healing worse, do your best to minimize your stress as much as possible. 

    Spend some time alone and enjoy your time in bed napping, listening to soothing music, or reading an interesting book. 

    This is the time to focus on self-care to get the most out of your results once you’re healed. 

    Wear Supportive Garments

    If your doctor has recommended garments to support your recovery, like compression bandages, make sure you comply with the instructions. Continue to wear your garments and bandages until the recommended period is up. By wearing these items, you support your body as it heals and ensures the best results possible. 

    Address Your Drainage

    Any draining that needs to occur following surgery should be managed under your doctor’s direction. If you are unsure of how to go about the process, wait and contact your doctor for the next steps. For healing and preventing infection, addressing your drainage is an essential step in recovery. Don’t overlook the significance of this part of healing. 

    Bottom Line

    Following tummy tuck surgery or something similar, taking care of your body is about getting all of the rest you need to care for your body as it heals. To get the most out of your results, follow the tips above and your doctor’s instructions. A new and happier you is on the way!

    The post How To Take Care of Your Body After Surgery appeared first on You Must Get Healthy.

  • If You Have Medium-To-Long Nails, You Must Try This Chic Design
    26 May 2022
    It's a modern yet classic look.
  • Tim Kennedy Is Always Ready for All …
    26 May 2022

    When the United States suffered an attack on Sept. 11, 2001, it was considered the darkest day in our country’s history. Over 3,000 lives were lost in total, and it was being televised live on every news outlet and as a result Americans from all walks of life found their local recruiters’ offices and wanted to become a part of the solution to help our nation and the world move forward. One of those Americans was Tim Kennedy.

    “9/11 had a pretty profound impact on me, watching Americans choose between being burned alive or jumping to their death. So, I actually went in a recruiter’s office on 9/11.” He actually didn’t get to speak to a recruiter until one day later, but Kennedy knew his destiny was to serve, and he wanted to make it happen sooner rather than later.

    “There was such backlog that it took a few months that I was on inactive reserves until I got a boot camp date,” said Kennedy. Once he was called into action, Kennedy would immediately be called up to Special Forces Selection.

    “I never served a regular day in the military,” he explained. After completing Ranger School, Kennedy was assigned to the 7th Special Forces group. Among the missions he went on included multiple deployments in support of both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. After more than two years of schooling and training, It was on one of those deployments that he had an epiphany about where he was in both the world and his life.

    “I was running towards what is gunfire. I look to my left and my right, and I see a bunch of Green Beret’s running with me. That was when it really clicked that I was at the right place. I’m with men like me.”

    Those that were like him were also those that appreciated great challenges, living in the moment, and doing all they could in the pursuit of protecting their homeland and the people in it. They embraced all of it, and they were all elite athletes as well. According to Kennedy, that was no coincidence.

    “The overlap on these is extraordinary. If you look at every special mission’s unit, the commonality among all of them is that are all extremely fit. They are all absolute Adonis-looking mother f*****s,” he stated. “Through athletics and martial arts, I had done so many hard things. I felt at home doing hard things in the military. I felt at home.”

    Courtesy of Tim Kennedy

    Tim Kennedy credited fitness and athletics for a lot of his success. In his eyes, people that were accomplished with their bodies were exactly what America needed in the aftermath of 9/11.

    “That generation of post 9/11 athletes that were recruited into the same program I was, these were all college runners, track and field, sprinters, wrestlers,” he said.

    Kennedy also said that the group he was a part of had the highest selection rates in any class ever in the history of Selection. He personally has received numerous honors as well. His most notable award is a Bronze Star, but he also holds the Army Achievement Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, and two NATO medals, just to name a few. When asked about his personal greatest moment, he couldn’t pinpoint just one moment, but rather a series of them where he connected with those he fought alongside on a deeper level.

    “I know everything about this human that is next to me, and it’s the most remarkable privilege to be able to be part of a community that knows you through and through, your faults, your failures, and is still proud to be serving with you.”

    The pressure that he faced throughout his missions and service came with other privileges as well. Among them was the ability to stay calm and execute in any situation, such as his MMA fights. Tim Kennedy is also well-known in the world of mixed martial arts. In 24 professional fights, he had a record of 18-6 with six wins by knockout and eight by submission. While many athletes may feel nervous or overwhelmed as they make the walk into the arena, Kennedy would make that same walk as if it was any other day that ended in “y.”

    “I would get told, ‘man, you’re too relaxed. Can you just get amped up for this fight?’ I would say ‘it’s just a fight,’” he said. “It was just fun to be out there fighting.”

    Kennedy fought in several organizations, including the now defunct International Fight League, Strikeforce, and ultimately, the UFC. He fought up until 2017 when he announced his retirement from the sport. That same year, he reenlisted in the Army Special Forces, and he is still actively involved.

    “I would attribute most of my success to my consistent, disciplined, regimented approach to fitness,” he shared proudly. “I carry that over. I know that sounds very militaristic, but I carry that over into the organizations of my businesses.”

    Tim Kennedy still uses that same approach to his fitness today. He’s up training early every morning, and he revealed that he has had training partners that have quit after one workout because of how intense he is during training.

    “I find the worst thing I can possibly do to my body first thing, and everything else in that day is easy,” Kennedy said. “There’s nothing that anybody else can do to me during the day that is worse than what I already selected to do to myself.”

    His overall approach to fitness has nothing to do with a look or visual. Anything and everything he does has a specific purpose, and that puts him in the best position to perform when called upon.

    “I want to be able to exercise so I can go and do something, or I want to exercise so I can go and be something. My workouts really embody that. They’re really tough. You can expect to be in the 80-90 percent heart rate range for a sustained period of time.”

    Tim Kennedy knows that he is in a position that can help inspire and educate people, which is why he wrote his latest book, “Scars and Stripes.” It will be available on June 7, and it can be pre-ordered now Kennedy shared that writing this was very meaningful to him.

    “That title is not a misnomer. The stripes you get in the military – they’re on your sleeves for years of service, for your missions overseas, and for years of service. Those are earned by years of suffering, and scars are earned the same way.”

    Follow Tim Kennedy on Instagram: @timkennedymma

    The post Tim Kennedy Is Always Ready for All … appeared first on Rewop.

  • 2022 World’s Strongest Man Day 2 Recap and Results
    26 May 2022

    Amidst ongoing triple-digit temperatures in Sacramento, CA, the competitive heat of the 2022 World’s Strongest Man (WSM) continues to charge along. 

    On Day 1, the 30-person roster of elite strongmen attempted the Loading Race and Deadlift Ladder during the Qualifying Round. On Wednesday, May 25, 2022 — during the second day of the Qualifying Round — the remaining competitors had the task of pulling a Volkswagen Bug in the Car Walk and using their overhead strength to try and thrive in the Log Lift

    The ensuing results were terrific to watch as the competition builds toward the weekend’s Finals. Here’s where the overall leaderboard stands after Day 2 of the 2022 WSM, along with a short recap of the athletes’ performances in both events. 

    2022 WSM Leaderboard — Day 2
    Rank Name Points
    Group 1
    1 Tom Stoltman — United Kingdom 24
    2 Kevin Faires — USA 18
    3 Gabriel Rheaume — Canada 16
    4 Aivars Smaukstelis — Latvia 13
    5 Andy Black — United Kingdom 7
    6 Manuel Angulo — Chile 3
    Group 2
    1 Mitchell Hooper — Canada 22.5
    2 Bobby Thompson — USA 17
    3 Brian Shaw — USA 13.5
    4 Gabriel Pena — Mexico 11
    5 Konstantine Janashia — Georgia 10
    6 Mark Felix — Canada 9
    Group 3
    1 Oleksii Novikov — Ukraine 21.5
    2 Adam Bishop — United Kingdom 16
    3 Trey Mitchell — USA 15.5
    4 Rob Kearney — USA 14
    5 Grzegorz Szymanski — Poland 9
    6 Mika Törrö — Finland 8
    Group 4
    1 Martins Licis — USA 21.5
    2 Maxime Boudreault — Canada 17
    3 Pavlo Kordiyaka — Ukraine 16.5
    4 Gavin Bilton — United Kingdom 15
    5 Nedžmin Ambešković — Bosnia and Herzegovina 6
    6 Shane Flowers — United Kingdom (withdrawn) 6
    Group 5
    1 Luke Stoltman — United Kingdom 23
    2 Eythor Ingolfsson Melsted — Iceland 16
    3 Jean-Stephen Coraboeuf — France 15
    4 Kelvin De Ruiter — Netherlands 11
    5 Evan Singleton — USA 9.5
    6 Kim Ujarak Lorentzen — Greenland 9
    2022 WSM Day 2

    Wednesday was the perfect time to unveil the Car Walk and Log Lift — two classic WSM events. Here’s how the competitors fared, and what it might mean for some of them moving forward. 

    Car Walk Results

    The athletes stepped inside a roofless, hollowed-out car constructed around a Yoke bar. For this event, they had to carry the 430-kilogram (950-pound) vehicle 20 meters (66 feet) as fast as they could. 

    With a 9.86-second run, Evan Singleton had the fastest time of all competitors on the Car Walk. Meanwhile, Rob Kearney turned in a blazing 11.63-second finish, and newcomer Mitchell Hooper blitzed the event in 11.64 seconds to continue his fantastic WSM debut. 

    Note: Unfortunately, Shane Flowers withdrew due to an apparent foot or ankle injury sustained during the Loading Race on Day 1. While he showed the grit of a champion in completing yesterday’s Deadlift Ladder as well, he was unable to continue competing on Day 2 and has withdrawn from his first appearance at the WSM.

    Group 1
    1. Tom Stoltman — 0:14.65s
    2. Gabriel Rhéaume — 0:16.44s
    3. Kevin Faires — 0:19.32s
    4. Aivars Šmaukstelis — 0:19.91s
    5. Andy Black — 0:32.71s
    6. Manuel Angulo — 1:00.00s
    Group 2
    1. Mitchell Hooper — 0:11.64s
    2. Mark Felix — 0:13.96s
    3. Bobby Thompson — 0:16.05s
    4. Konstantine Janashia — 0:18.16s
    5. Brian Shaw — 0:19.97s
    6. Gabriel Peña — 18.90m (Did not finish course)
    Group 3
    1. Rob Kearney — 0:11.63s
    2. Grzegorz Szymanski — 0:14.26s
    3. Oleksii Novikov — 0:15.23s
    4. Trey Mitchell — 0:19.24s
    5. Adam Bishop — 0:23.38s
    6. Mika Törrö — 9.50m (Did not finish course)
    Group 4
    1. Pavlo Kordiyaka — 0:12.92s
    2. Martins Licis — 0:18.93s
    3. Gavin Bilton — 0:23.67s
    4. Maxime Boudreault — 0:49.28s
    5. Nedžmin Ambešković — 13.60m (Did not finish course)
    6. Shane Flowers — Withdrawn
    Group 5
    1. Evan Singleton — 0:09.86s
    2. Luke Stoltman — 0:16.65s
    3. Eythor Ingolfsson Melsted — 0:29.07s
    4. Jean-Stephen Coraboeuf — 0:41.34s
    5. Kelvin De Ruiter — 1:00.00s
    6. Kim Ujarak — 11.40m (Did not finish course)
    Log Lift Results

    The Log Lift made its first appearance during the 1980 WSM contest. In this year’s event, competitors had to lift the 145-kilogram (320-pound) log from the ground to an overhead position for as many reps as possible within a 75-second time limit.

    As the temperature got to 100-plus degrees, the log itself took on heat. It is here where holding the weight for the duration was a challenge for many of the competitors. Event organizers had been keeping the log covered in an attempt to provide shade and make the event the usual test of strength rather than pain tolerance.

    Maxime Boudreault and Luke Stoltman tied for the best finish on the Log Lift by pressing 10 reps. Oleksii Novikov, Trey Mitchell, Martin Licis, and Pavlo Kordiyaka weren’t far behind with nine reps each. 

    Group 1
    1. Tom Stoltman — 8 reps
    2. Kevin Faires — 7 reps
    3. Gabriel Rhéaume — 6 rep
    4. Aivars Šmaukstelis — 4 reps
    5. Andy Black — No reps
    6. Manuel Angulo — No reps
    Group 2
    1. Bobby Thompson — 8 reps
    2. Mitchell Hooper — 7 reps
    3. Brian Shaw — 7 reps
    4. Konstantine Janashia — 5 reps
    5. Gabriel Peña — 1 rep
    6. Mark Felix — No reps
    Group 3
    1. Oleksii Novikov — 9 reps
    2. Trey Mitchell — 9 reps
    3. Adam Bishop — 7 reps
    4. Rob Kearney — 6 reps
    5. Grzegorz Szymanski — 3 reps
    6. Mika Törrö — 2 reps
    Group 4
    1. Maxime Boudreault — 10 reps
    2. Martins Licis — 9 reps
    3. Pavlo Kordiyaka — 9 reps
    4. Gavin Bilton — 7 reps
    5. Nedžmin Ambešković — 2 reps
    6. Shane Flowers — Withdrawn
    Group 5
    1. Luke Stoltman — 10 reps
    2. Eythor Ingolfsson Melsted — 8 reps
    3. Jean-Stephen Coraboeuf — 7 reps
    4. Kim Ujarak — 6 reps
    5. Kelvin De Ruiter — 1 rep
    6. Evan Singleton — 1 rep
    Day 3 Is Next

    As the competition inches closer to the weekend’s Finals, the intensity will likely only increase. With clarity in some groups already carved out, the final day of qualifying on Thursday should make for a tight finish. Those on the borderline still trying to qualify will need every point they can get.

    On Day 3, all of the athletes will have to hold a wrecking ball as long as possible in the Wrecking Ball Hold. Then, this year’s WSM will see the first appearance of the Atlas Stones in the Stone-Off as the athletes battle for the last spots in the Finals. 

    A clutch performance or two from some of the sport’s top contenders potentially awaits. 

    Featured image: Joe Martinez/World’s Strongest Man

    The post 2022 World’s Strongest Man Day 2 Recap and Results appeared first on Breaking Muscle.

  • Over 60? These Are the Only 2 Exercises You Should Be Doing to Build Functional Strength
    26 May 2022
    As you get older you naturally begin to lose flexibility, mobility, strength, stability, and balance.  You...
  • This Ancient Mindfulness Practice Is Proven To Promote Detoxification
    25 May 2022
    Ditch the detox drink and grab your yoga mat!
  • Release Your Lower Back To Relieve Pregnancy-Related Pain With These 4 Stretches
    25 May 2022

    Pregnancy can be quite a physical journey. As your body undergoes monumental changes to accommodate a growing baby, unfortunately, muscle aches seem to be a nearly inextricable part of the process—particularly lower back pain.

    “Carrying around extra weight puts added stress on the muscles of our low back, especially when you consider that a lot of that extra weight is carried in the front [of the] body,” explains Antonietta Vicario, a certified yoga and Pilates instructor and the vice president of talent and training at P.volve, a physical therapy-inspired functional fitness method for women. “During pregnancy, it is common to have more of an arch to the lower back, called lordosis, caused by the shift in the center of gravity. The extra weight and extra compression of the lordotic curve are a recipe for low back pain.”

    Fortunately, stretching can be a safe, natural, and effective way to relieve this discomfort. Vicario walked us through four of the most effective moves that are safe for any trimester of pregnancy.

    Cat stretch

    This stretch helps release tension in the lower back because it provides the opposite movement of lordosis, the typical sway back posture often present during pregnancy (especially as the baby grows). That arching of the lower spine could be putting extra strain and tension on the vertebrae, notes Vicario. She adds that cat stretch “is also a great movement to open up between the shoulder blades, another common area of tension.”

    • Get down on your hands and knees in a tabletop position with a flat back and your core engaged.
    • Exhale and contract through your abdominals as you round your upper spine towards the ceiling, dropping the head and tailbone toward the floor.
    • Continue for as many reps and at a speed that works best to relieve tightness in your lower back.

    Wide child’s pose

    “A wide child’s pose lengthens the posterior chain of the body to stretch out the lower back while also being incredibly restful,” shares Vicario. She suggests closing your eyes and breathing into the lower back to augment the benefit of this stretch. “Slow, deep breaths stimulate your parasympathetic nervous system, your ‘rest-and-digest response,’ which may lower any stress or cortisol in the body,” she explains.

    • Kneel down with your big toes together, knees wide.
    • Sit back on your heels and rest your chest and forehead on the floor or a pillow in front of you. Your arms should be extended straight in front of you as far as they can go. If your growing belly gets in the way, spread your knees wider to make room.
    • Focus on breathing deeply, aiming to exhale longer than you inhale, which stimulates your vagus nerve: Inhale for four to six counts, and exhale for six to eight counts.

    Kneeling lunge

    “The lordotic curve created by a growing belly can also tax and shorten the muscles of the hip flexors,” says Vicario, who notes that opening the front of the hips with this stretch may also relieve low back pain.

    • Drop down into a kneeling forward lunge with your knees bent at 90-degree angles, your torso upright and core engaged.
    • Squeeze the glute on the rear leg and shift your pelvis forward while reaching overhead. One tip Vicario shares for this stretch is to focus on creating space in the front of your hip and along your lower back to reduce any tension or tightness in these areas.
    • Repeat eight to 10 slow reps, and then switch sides.
    Pigeon pose

    Low back pain during pregnancy can also be a result of tightness from the hips, and this yoga pose can help stretch the muscles in that area. According to Vicario, “The extra weight of the baby requires that our glutes do a lot more work for locomotion, so stretching the muscles of the glutes can help relieve lower back sensitivity.”

    • Sit on the floor with one leg folded as close to a 90-degree angle as possible in front of your body (sort of like a cross-legged position), and extend the other leg straight back behind you. Ensure your pelvis is both grounded and square, which may mean you need to stack pillows or towels under one hip.
    • Fold your body forward until you feel a comfortable stretch on the side of the glutes. Inhale and exhale slowly for a minimum of 20 to 45 seconds to allow for the muscles to release.
    • Switch legs and repeat.

    Remember to breathe

    With all of these stretches, Vicario says that slow, deep breathing is paramount. “One of our biggest rules of thumb at P.volve is that when moving throughout pregnancy, be sure to breathe to create stability,” she explains. “We always cue for you to ‘blow before you go,’ as that exhale creates muscular support during a time where you may feel more unstable in movement due to the shift in one’s center of gravity.”

    Vicario also notes that deep breathing works to calm and restore the body. “Sometimes, our stress carries over to tightness in the body, so by prioritizing breathwork within a stretch for the lower back, you are doing two for one,” says Vicario. “While this time of life is incredibly exciting, it can also be busy, and sometimes stressful, especially as one’s delivery date nears.”

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  • How to Do the Single-Arm Dumbbell Row for Bigger Lats
    25 May 2022

    Back workouts will always require both vertical and horizontal pulling exercises for complete development. While pull-ups and pulldowns are common vertical pulls, one of the most fundamental horizontal pulling exercises is the single-arm dumbbell row.

    The single-arm dumbbell row is a unilateral (single-side) exercise that builds the strength and size of the latissimus dorsi (large back muscle) and improves the overall function of the shoulder joint. Here’s what you need to know about one of the most simple and effective back exercises.

    How to Do the Single-Arm Dumbbell Row

    There are several similar variations of the single-arm row, which will be addressed in a separate section of the article, using a variety of arm positions and paths of motion to emphasize different muscles. The most basic single-arm row technique will emphasize the lat muscle.

    Step 1 — Support Yourself on a Flat Bench Syda Productions / Shutterstock

    Put one hand and the same-side knee on a flat bench with a dumbbell resting on the bench between them. Your back should remain flat and your shoulder blades should be pulled down and back, towards the back pocket of your pants. Keep your head and neck neutral, not pointed up to the ceiling or down towards the ground. Your eyes can look at the ground in front of the bench.

    Grab the dumbbell with the hand that isn’t on the bench. With your palm facing the bench, allow the weight to reach to the ground without pulling your shoulder joint down. Your elbow should be relatively straight, but not locked, in the stretched position.

    Form Tip: The dumbbell will try to pull your body down to one side, but keep your core muscles engaged throughout the exercise to keep your hips level and maintain a straight line from your hips to your neck.

    Step 2 — Lift the Weight Towards Your Hip Credit: Slatan / Shutterstock

    Bend your elbow to slide the weight towards the hip on the same side. Maintain a neutral hand position, with your palm facing the bench and your body. Keep your elbow close to the body to maximally engage the lat muscle.

    Keep your hand in line with your forearm, directly beneath your elbow. In the top position, your forearm should be near your ribs and the weight should almost touch your hip.

    Form Tip: As you pull the weight up, don’t over-rotate your shoulders or twist your trunk. Avoid jerking the weight or heaving your upper body to create momentum.

    Step 3 — Lower to the Stretched Position Credit: Syda Productions / Shutterstock

    Slowly reverse direction to lower the weight back to the starting point. Be sure the weight moves in a slight arc away from your hip until your arm is nearly straight with the weight directly under your shoulder.

    Form Tip: Don’t lose your shoulder placement as you lower the weight. Keep your shoulder locked into your shoulder girdle and pulled away from the ear, not shrugged up towards your ear or towards the ceiling.

    Single-Arm Dumbbell Row Mistakes to Avoid

    Most form problems with the single-arm row have to do with losing proper position of the torso, shoulder, or arm. Maintaining focus on body awareness and simple technique cues can help you to avoid these issues.

    Sagging Lower Back

    Losing core engagement can cause the lower back to start to drop toward the bench. This can cause back pain or injury by increasing strain on the vertebrae.

    Credit: Svitlana Hulko / Shutterstock

    Avoid It: Imagine lengthening your spine in both directions, from your tailbone to your neck. Keep your abs tense. Don’t allow your hips to rotate, which can encourage your lower back to drop out of position.

    Curving the Spine Upward

    Just like a sagging spine, the opposite is possible and equally problematic. You want to maintain a neutral torso, neither rounded or curved excessively, in order to keep your joints aligned for optimal power output and muscle recruitment.

    Credit: Alberto Isidro Orozco / Shutterstock

    Losing a neutral-spine position and curving too far up will prevent the shoulder from achieving a full range of motion. This will make the exercise less effective and can strain the shoulder joint.

    Avoid it: Think of keeping your upper body flat with strong abs and steady, stable hips.

    Dropping Out of the Shoulder Joint

    Especially in the eccentric (lowering) portion of the exercise, the shoulder placement can get lost as the weight “pulls” the arm downward.

    Credit: Syda Productions / Shutterstock

    If the shoulder drops out of the shoulder girdle and the shoulder blades come forward, you can be exposed to shoulder pain or injury.

    Avoid it: Keep your shoulder blade pressed towards your back pocket throughout the exercise, especially while lowering the weight into the stretched position.

    Benefits of the Single-Arm Dumbbell Row

    The single-arm row is one of the most efficient ways to build size and strength in the back, shoulders, and arms.

    Credit: antoniodiaz / Shutterstock

    The movement works a majority of muscles in the upper body and can be used to emphasize muscular size or strength.

    Training for a V-Taper Physique

    The single-arm row can add muscular size to the shoulders, upper back, and lats to create an ideal v-taper, or inverted triangle, physique. This gives the appearance of an athletic, well-developed body.

    Training for Strength

    Building strength in the muscles of the back can carry over to improved stability when supporting the weight during heavy bench presses, overhead presses, and countless other exercises.

    Improved Shoulder Health

    Because the single-arm row activates upper back muscles including the trapezius and rhomboids, it can be beneficial for overall scapular health and shoulder function.

    Muscles Worked by Single-Arm Dumbbell Row

    The single-arm row is a thorough upper body exercise because it incorporates several muscles in one movement.

    Credit: MDV Edwards / Shutterstock

    Like many multi-joint (compound) exercises, it’s an efficient choice for a variety of workout programs.

    Latissimus Dorsi

    The largest back muscle, the latissimus dorsi or “lat,” is the primary muscle being recruited during single-arm rows. The lats are found on both sides of your back, running from the shoulder blades to below the ribs. They primarily work to draw the upper arm towards the centerline of your body.

    Upper Back

    The upper back consists of several relatively more minor muscles running across the shoulder blades, including the rhomboids, rear deltoids (shoulders), and teres major and minor. These muscles share similar roles for scapular (shoulder blade) mobility and stability.

    Biceps Brachii

    The biceps, found on the front part of the upper arm, work to bend and flex the elbow. They are recruited secondarily, not as primary movers, during the row.

    Who Should Do the Single-Arm Dumbbell Row

    The single-arm row is compatible with most lifters. It’s a useful addition to a beginner’s upper body training and it can be trained long-term as you progress in form and weight as you go along.

    Lifters Training for Muscle Size

    The single-arm row has been a bodybuilding staple for decades because it focuses the muscle-building stimulus on one side of the body at a time, which allows for more focused training and symmetrical growth and development.

    Beginning Lifters

    The support of the bench will help to focus on form. It’s an excellent way to train multiple muscles while increasing back strength. The single-arm row is a foundational exercise which helps to build a base of general strength.

    Frequent Sitters

    If you sit for work, stare at a computer screen for a big part of your day, or find that you are starting to get a forward roll in your upper back, the single-arm row can help to counteract alignment issues and postural problems by strengthening the upper back.

    How to Program the Single-Arm Dumbbell Row

    The single-arm row is versatile and can be used in a range of programming for all complete back and shoulder development.

    Single-Arm Row for Size Gains

    If you are working on gaining size in the lats, use the single-arm row on a low-rep, high-weight upper body day. Perform three to four sets of six to eight reps using a weight that makes the last two reps very difficult to complete. Never lose stability in the shoulder or core, even when lifting heavy.

    Single-Arm Row for Mobility

    The single-arm row can be programmed to improve shoulder and upper back mobility. This approach will focus on good alignment in the spine, stability in the shoulder, and a slow eccentric (lowering) motion. Take one second to raise the weight and three seconds to lower it — think “up, down, down, down.” This type of training uses a moderate weight for two to three sets of 10 to 12 repetitions, with the last two reps being relatively difficult to complete at the slow tempo. 

    Single-Arm Row for Recovery

    If you are recovering from a shoulder overuse injury, consider performing the exercise without weights or with one to five pounds, for one or two sets of 20 to 25 reps. The purpose here is just to keep the joint mobile and increase the flexibility of the muscles around the joint.

    Single-Arm Dumbbell Row Variations

    Minor adjustments to hand or body position, or range of motion, can challenge your muscles in a new way and alter muscle recruitment for more variety.

    Floor Single-Arm Row

    No bench? No problem. Use the floor. Get down on your hands and knees. Mimic the same positioning of your back and shoulders. Place the dumbbell weight under your hand and pull from there. The weight can touch the floor at the bottom of the exercise.

    This can be an ideal option for lifters with shoulder issues because the range of motion is reduced and the floor supports the bottom of the exercise, rather than the weight hanging freely by your side.

    Self-Supported Single-Arm Row

    Stand with slightly bent legs while bent forward at the waist in a hinge position. Support yourself with your non-working hand on your thigh. Perform the row the same way as you would with a bench. Make sure you don’t raise your torso and turn the exercise into a shrug.

    If balance is an issue, you can stand in a lunge-type position with your feet staggered while resting your free hand on the forward leg.

    Supinated Single-Arm Row

    Instead of the palm facing the side of the body, turn your palm towards the front (supinated) and maintain this hand position during the exercise. This significantly recruits the biceps while also involving the lats.

    This grip adjustment also allows you to pull the weight higher into your hip, which changes the feel of the peak contraction.

    Elbow-Out Single-Arm Row

    This variation emphasizes the upper back much more than the lats, making it a more effective exercise for targeting upper back size and/or shoulder health. (1)

    Face your palm towards your feet throughout the set and row with your elbow to the side in line with your shoulder, rather than close to your ribs. In the top position, your shoulder, elbow, and hand should form a 90-degree angle from your body.

    Single-Arm Dumbbell Row Alternatives

    Lots of exercises are great for the upper back, and it’s great to change them up or add some to your regular routine.

    Seated Row

    The seated row can be performed at a cable station or with a resistance band around the feet, sitting on the floor.

    Keep a tall upper body posture and stable body position, and work through a full range of motion using a thumbs-up grip for optimal back and shoulder recruitment.

    Lat Pulldown

    The pulldown is a fundamental vertical pulling exercise for strengthening the lats. Keep your shoulders down and back during the exercise in order to also recruit your upper back.

    Keep your core engaged and don’t allow your spine to round. In the bottom position, your elbows should be slightly behind you for a complete muscular contraction.

    FAQs

    Why do I feel the single-arm dumbbell row mostly in my biceps?

    Double-check your form. Make sure you have good spinal alignment and an engaged core. Don’t allow your shoulder to reach out of the shoulder girdle. most importantly, focus on pulling the weight back toward your hip, instead of towards your shoulder, to engage more lat muscle and less biceps.

    Why does my neck hurt during the exercise?

    You’re likely trying to look forward, which is cranking your neck in an awkward position. Keep your gaze down to the floor slightly in front of the bench, not up towards the wall or mirror and not down towards your hand on the bench.

    One Arm, All the Gains

    The single-arm dumbbell row is a key player in long-term training. Mastering this fundamental exercise as a beginner can pay off with wider lats, a stronger upper back, and healthier shoulders in the long-run. Grab your bench and start rowing.

    References
    1. Fennell, J., Phadke, C. P., Mochizuki, G., Ismail, F., & Boulias, C. (2016). Shoulder Retractor Strengthening Exercise to Minimize Rhomboid Muscle Activity and Subacromial Impingement. Physiotherapy Canada. Physiotherapie Canada, 68(1), 24–28. https://doi.org/10.3138/ptc.2014-83

    Featured Image: antoniodiaz / Shutterstock

    The post How to Do the Single-Arm Dumbbell Row for Bigger Lats appeared first on Breaking Muscle.

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