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26 May 2022

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  • Mama Dog Who Lost Her Litter Is A Miracle For Ten Orphaned Puppies
    26 May 2022

    When Lexi Johnson, a volunteer foster for Ruff Start Rescue, was presented with the opportunity to take in pregnant pup Poppy, she was thrilled. As a dog lover, and as someone who studied animal behavior, she had always wanted to foster a pregnant mama dog.

    Her heart was bursting, and she excitedly shared the news with her friends and family.

    Image Credit: Lexi Johnson/ FacebookThen, about one week after she came to live with Lexi, the beautiful Lab Mix birthed ten healthy puppies. Lexi even appointed herself as her “doggy doula” and helped mama Poppy through it all. Poppy was an amazing mother, and was so strong during her long labor.

    But unfortunately, shortly after she had her precious puppies, Poppy unexpectedly passed away. This left all ten newborn puppies motherless. Lexi’s heart was shattered. 

    Image Credit: Lexi Johnson/ Facebook

    “We frantically started figuring out our next move with the babies. Another volunteer was over until 11:30 that night helping bottle feed. And throughout the evening my husband and I were up every three hours getting food in their bellies… and it was taking over 1.5 hours each time,” wrote Lexi.

    When newborn puppies are left without a source of milk, they need to be fed a special formula every couple of hours. Because Poppy had such a large litter, this task was requiring close to constant care. So, in order for them to best tend to Poppy’s ten puppies, some of them had to be spread out among multiple volunteers. An entire team of fosters had to come together to care for the large litter of orphaned pups.

    Image Credit: Lexi Johnson / FacebookNot long after Poppy passed away, another mama dog within Ruff Start Rescue was experiencing her own heartbreak. Pepper, also a Lab Mix, had given birth to her own litter of precious puppies. But sadly, they did not survive. Rescue volunteers shared that after losing her litter, Pepper was “devastated” and she started to “grow very depressed.” They hoped that Pepper could be the miracle that Poppy’s puppies needed. 

    “When she got to our house, we brought her in the puppy room and she immediately sat next to the litter. I started placing puppies around her and she laid down and the puppies instinctively hobbled towards her and started nursing,” shared Lexi.

    Image Credit: Lexi Johnson / FacebookUnder Lexi’s watchful eyes, they introduced Pepper to the litter of puppies. And after only five minutes, she started tending to them as if they were her own! Pepper didn’t hesitate to immediately begin cleaning and loving on them. They even instinctively began nursing. It was a match made in heaven.   

    Image Credit: Lexi Johnson / FacebookWhile all the puppies were thriving with their foster humans, the best place for them is with a mama who can give them milk, and teach them behaviors and “puppy things” that we as humans simply cannot. Pepper was exactly what these lucky puppies needed, and with them, she got to be the mother she hoped to be. It’s hard not to shed a couple of tears thinking about how appreciative Poppy would be of Pepper taking on her mama role. 

    “I couldn’t have done it without a village of people- and everyone is simply so grateful for the happy outcome,” wrote Lexi.

    Image Credit: Lexi Johnson / FacebookThe puppies will be at their foster home with Lexi until they are adoptable at eight to ten weeks old. Then, they will be listed on the Ruff Start Rescue website.

    H / T: kare11.com
    Featured Image: Lexi Ruhland / Facebook

    The post Mama Dog Who Lost Her Litter Is A Miracle For Ten Orphaned Puppies appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

  • Selfless Man Drives Over 1,000 Miles To Reunite A Terminally Ill Woman With Her Dog
    26 May 2022

    A Wisconsin woman’s life was uprooted when she discovered she was terminally ill, and that she and her pup would need to relocate to a friend’s house across the country for help during her last days. What already seemed like a nightmare was made even more heartbreaking once the airlines turned her dog away.

    The staff at the airline explained to the distraught woman that because of her dog’s “smooshed face”, he would not be able to fly along with her due to the risks of respiratory distress. Because she needed immediate help, and being so seriously ill, she had no other choice than to drop her pup off at her veterinarian’s office.

    RyanChukuske/Facebook

    As the woman dropped off her beloved companion at her vet’s office, she explained her desperate situation. The kind staff at the clinic promised they would do everything they could to help reunite the two, and reached out to Spot’s Last Stop Canine Rescue for help.

    Spot’s Last Stop Canine Rescue is an organization based out of Minnesota that helps to foster homeless canines, find them loving homes, and everything in between! Once they began sharing this woman’s story with previous adopters through their program, they recruited the help of a selfless man who is dedicated to “paying it forward.”

    RyanChukuske/Facebook

    Ryan Chukuske is an advocate for being kind to others and helping people in need as often as you can. Once he heard the details of this sad situation, he stepped up without hesitation. This dog was all the terminally ill woman had left, and he couldn’t stand the thought of them not being together during her last days.

    Ryan soon set off on the cross-country adventure to reunite the lovable pup named Bailey with his favorite person. You’d think Bailey was a professional at this whole road trip thing, as he rode shotgun without a trace of fear!

    RyanChukuske/Facebook

    “This is Bailey. His person is moving to Washington state to prepare for her journey into the next life. The airlines wouldn’t fly her dog so we’re off on a road trip to get this pup home to be with his mom. Be good to others. Journey on my friends!” – Ryan

    The two soaked in the sights of the Pacific North West over their 3-day long journey together, and before they knew it, Bailey was in the arms of the caring friends that would care for the ill woman during her last stage of life.

    RyanChukuske/Facebook

    Ryan was not able to meet the sick woman due to her being admitted to the ICU during their time on the road, but he was grateful for the opportunity to help regardless. Everyone is hopeful that Bailey’s mom will be out of the hospital and reunited with her furry best friend soon!

    We are so amazed by Ryan’s selfless act to give the woman the opportunity to have her loyal companion by her side during this difficult time. We are sending all our love their way!

    H/T: kstp.com
    Image Source: RyanChukuske/Facebook

    The post Selfless Man Drives Over 1,000 Miles To Reunite A Terminally Ill Woman With Her Dog appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

  • Enrico
    26 May 2022
    Beautiful boy Enrico, brother of Enzo, were both found abandoned and were lucky to have a foster home without having to go into the shelter, and they came on leaps and bounds because of this. Both are now house trained and learning everything about living in a home. Enrico walks nicely on lead and loves to go out for walks (as you can see by the photos). He is a very friendly boy puppy aged 6 months, who is good with other dogs. He is a medium sized lad about the size of a Labrador with a black short soft coat, white chest and 2 paws and a beard!
    He loves his cuddles and played nicely with his brother when in Spain, and also with the other dogs from their foster home.
    He is good in the car and now used to crowded places and walking in public parks as you can see by his photos
     
    His Best Points :
    Friendly and likes other dogs
     
    Foster Report :
    Enrico did like cats at his foster home, but he is now chasing kittens now that he is in the UK so we think no to cats to be on the safe side
     
    Dog Details :

    Breed :      Mixed breed

    Age :          born 7/12/21 so 6 months puppy

    Gender:    Male

    Height:      Medium to large 

    Weight:      9.3 kg

    Living with dogs :   Yes

    Living with cats :    No

    Living with children :   Yes over 10 years

    NEEDS to live with another dog Maybe

    Health:  No Health issues notified

    Neutered:  No too young

    Current location
    In a foster home in UK

    Adoption Fee : £195 – to be paid direct to the Spanish rescue to cover new, excessive, extra EU travel costs, via UK bank account

    NOTE – Homecheck : All our adoptions are subject to successful homechecks. There is now a deposit for all homechecks of £25 which is deducted from the adoption fee.

    If the homecheck fails the £25 will be reimbursed.

    If people withdraw after the homecheck this is non refundable.

    FURTHER NOTE

    ALL HOMECHECKS ARE NOW CONDUCTED VIRTUALLY

    PROOF OF ID AND LANDLORD PERMISSION IS REQUIRED

    Adopting A DogWatch UK Rescue Dog

    Before being adopted, dogs will have been vaccinated, wormed and treated for fleas.
    If old enough they will have been neutered, if too young the new owners will need to ensure this is done.
    All dogs are microchipped
    All new owners can apply for 4 weeks Pet Insurance  FREE, to apply please ask us for the pamphlet, our charity reference number is 1400005179.

    All new owners will need to change their new dogs microchip information to their contact details. This costs £17. If you would like us to arrange this for you, at a reduced rate of £7.20, we will ask you to do a bank transfer to allow us to register the change.

    For Rescue Dogs coming from overseas

    This adoption fee is a contribution towards the costs of rescuing the dog including
    – microchip, pet passport, vaccines, tests for South European diseases, neutering (IF OLD ENOUGH), parasite treatment and transport to the UK.
    We can not home dogs from overseas to people who work full time or long hours, unless some sort of doggy day care is offered. They need someone at home a lot of the day, they are not used to being alone for long periods. A dog walker for an hour out of the day is not enough.
    Leaving dogs a long time on their own means they are highly likely to develop separation anxiety which is distressing for them and everyone in their new home.

    How to adopt a DogWatch UK Rescue Dog

    For full details see our Adoption page

    To apply to adopt please fill in our adoption application

    The post Enrico appeared first on DogwatchUK.

  • Why Do Dogs Eat Mulch? (Learn What You Need To Know)
    26 May 2022

    Why do dogs eat mulch? A lot of dog breeds have been known to eat just about anything, and a dog eating mulch or a puppy eating mulch is no...

    Read More

    The post Why Do Dogs Eat Mulch? (Learn What You Need To Know) appeared first on Home Sweet Pups.

  • What Are The Pros And Cons Of Telemedicine For Dogs?
    25 May 2022
    Telemedicine is a unique service of pet care. When using telemedicine for dogs, your pet will be examined, diagnosed and treated remotely. It is easier and quicker to find and solve the health problems of your dogs, as you can use the service right at your place. Nowadays, with the growth of the Internet and […]
  • New Studies Show That Yelling At Your Dog Can Have Heartbreaking Effects
    25 May 2022

    Training a new puppy can be frustrating. With the possibility of accidents in the house and destruction of your belongings, overwhelmed pet parents often resort to yelling. What was once thought of as harmless mild punishment style training is now proving to have lasting effects on our beloved companions. It’s time to think twice before yelling.

    Styles of Training

    With the variety of training schools and resources that are available to us, it’s important to understand the most common forms of training styles that are offered at dog training academies. When you are researching methods, you will often find these two common styles of training:

    • Positive reinforcement/Reward training: This type of training is commonly known as reward based, force free, and clicker style training. This method is done by establishing a marker for correctness and timing, and then reinforcing the behavior with a treat or play time. For example, consider the process of using a clicker to teach your dog to sit. By using your clicker each time you’d like your pup to pay attention, they will soon realize that once the clicker is out it’s time to listen up if they want a treat! When they sit on command, you award them with a click, followed with a treat. By using positive reinforcement, you receive a well-trained pup that is eager to please. This process is of course more involved with each new command, but the basic premise is a command followed by a reward.

     

    • Negative reinforcement/Discipline training: This type of training is based on asserting dominance on your dog through fear of punishment. This could be yelling, leash pulling, hitting, shock collars, or any other form of “corrections” during training in an effort to teach them basic obedience. While this technique may have come first in the world of dog training, it is now shown to have lasting effects on a dog’s mental well-being.
    The Study

    Most studies on dog behavior and punishment training have been performed on police and military dogs, so it was time to see how our furry companions felt about our training styles. To find out how true companion dogs reacted to punishment, the scientists at the University of Porto in Portugal (study led by Ana Catarina Vieira de Castro) recruited 42 dogs from reward-based training programs which used food or play as rewards, and 50 dogs from negative reinforcement style training that included yelling and leash jerking.

    In order to accurately measure their stress levels, each dog had their saliva tested for the stress hormone cortisol before and after training, as well as had their training sessions recorded.

    The short term results of more “fear based” training left the dogs with higher levels of cortisol in their saliva during training, as well as at home in the following hours after their training sessions. They also displayed physical examples of stress such as licking their lips and yawning. Dogs with positive reinforcement training did not experience any spikes in their cortisol levels or stress related body language.

    It’s clear that your choice of training methods can have an instant impact on your dog’s stress level, but how about the long term effects?

    Long Term Effects

    To find out if their training styles had lasting effects, the team studied 79 of the dogs’ reaction to a food reward. First, they trained each dog to associate one side of a room with a tasty sausage treat. If the bowl was present on that side of the room, it would contain a sausage. Each bowl on the other side of the room would always be empty.

    They then placed an empty bowl in different positions between the two extremes and measured how quickly each dog would approach the new bowl.

    Researchers separated the two types of dogs by listing them as either pessimistic or optimistic. The optimistic dogs had reward style training while the pessimistic dogs received mild punishment during their training.  The researchers explained these two variants as glass half full vs glass half empty types of personalities.

    An “optimistic” dog would eagerly approach the bowl hoping to find a delicious sausage, while the “pessimistic” dog would approach the bowl slowly and seem a bit more uneasy.

    The pessimistic dogs also happened to be associated with separation anxiety and multiple behavioral problems. The more severe the punishment-based training they received, the more drastic the results.

    The Result

    This study proves that our style of dog training can have lasting impacts on our furry friends. Though the effectiveness of training style were not addressed, nor which option is “better”, it’s clear that the lasting impact on a dog is quite sad.

    “Critically, our study points to the fact that the welfare of companion dogs trained with aversive-based methods appears to be at risk.” – Researchers

    Some studies have even shown that reward style training may help our dogs better understand their training process versus just being fearful of an action. No matter which method you choose to abide by, it’s now clear that reward training is much better for your dog’s happiness and mental health.

    Reward style training is also thought to be more effective in the sense of instilling obedience in every situation. In fear-based training, dogs often associate one pet parent or person with fear of possible punishment. By using this training method, your dog may not follow commands in situations that don’t involve you.

    By using reward style training, every person with a command brings the possibility of a reward!

    Summary

    As pet parents, it’s up to us to provide a life filled with love and comfort for our furry friends. By focusing on reward style training, we can help our dogs understand the basics of obedience training without the fear and stress that can come along with punishment style methods.

    Though our dogs can come with their own set of frustrating quirks, they can be addressed in a kind and fear-free way. The next time you have the urge to yell at your furry BFF, remember that their happiness and comfort lays in your hands.

    The post New Studies Show That Yelling At Your Dog Can Have Heartbreaking Effects appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

  • Missing Arizona Hiker Found Dead: Loyal Lab, Ranger, Survives By His Side
    25 May 2022

    In Yavapai County, Arizona, a local news story becomes another example of why dogs are often referred to as “man’s best friend.”

    Authorities were, unfortunately, not surprised to find the deceased remains of hiker Donald Hayes after six long days of searching. After all, the chances of a person surviving the brutal heat and terrain of the Mingus Mountains for days on end with minimal food and water are slim to none.

    However, they were surprised to find that Hayes’ hiking companion, a lab mix named Ranger, was lying beside his deceased owner. And even more surprising was the fact that Ranger was alive.

    Facebook

    “Mr. Hayes’ dog Ranger, who was with him on the hike, was found alive, having remained with the victim.” said the Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office

    Hayes was seventy-four at the time of his death, and while an official cause of death has not yet been released, it is the general assumption that Hayes succumbed to the brutality of the elements.

    Hayes and his buddy, Ranger, had hiked approximately eight miles before losing their way. When Hayes realized that they were lost in the vast mountains, he called his wife and asked her to alert local authorities. Officers instructed Hayes to stay in place so that he could be more easily located. Unfortunately, Hayes did not heed this advice and continued on, turning off his cell phone to save battery life.

    Facebook

    The Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office immediately launched a massive search and rescue team, which included volunteers from the community, working dogs, and all available officers. One member of this search group was Dr. Heather Lum, a licensed veterinarian who works closely with the county’s canine search and rescue team.

    The team searched the Mingus Mountains for five long days with not a clue as to where Hayes and his pup could be. It was almost as if they had disappeared out of thin air! Finally, on the fifth day of the search, Hayes was found deceased, with Ranger by his side. Ranger was very weak and critically dehydrated, but he was alive.

    “I think the elements definitely took a toll on Ranger. He was not mobile (at the time of rescue), but his head was up and he was responsive to us saying his name and petting him” – Dr. Heather Lum

    The veterinary team went to work immediately to stabilize Ranger for transport to the closest emergency hospital. Fortunately, the team came equipped with a “go bag” of ER essentials. The team administered subcutaneous fluids and oxygen to the poor pup and did their best to cool him down while transport was arranged.

    Facebook

    “It doesn’t surprise at all that his dog stayed with him and didn’t want to leave,” said Josh Sanders of the Search and Rescue Team

    Once Ranger was well enough to travel, he was taken to a local emergency veterinarian, where he could be stabilized further and treated for his exposure to the elements. Members of the community created a GoFundMe to collect donations towards Ranger’s medical bills, and, as of last Saturday, over $4,000 had been collected.

    Ranger has since been discharged from the hospital and returned to his home, where he will live out the rest of his days alongside Donald’s wife, Marjorie. Ranger’s loyalty in the face of danger has become an inspiration to the community, with friends and neighbors expressing their sincere amazement at Ranger’s commitment to Mr. Hayes:

    “Heartbreaking,” said one user, “and his faithful dog stayed by his side…..A dog truly is man’s best friend.”

    Facebook

     

    Feature Image: Facebook

    The post Missing Arizona Hiker Found Dead: Loyal Lab, Ranger, Survives By His Side appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

  • Teacup Puppies Dog Breed: Is This Micro Pet Breed Real?
    25 May 2022
    Teacup Puppies Dog Breed: Are They Real?

    What Are Teacup Puppies Dog Breed?
    Teacup puppies are micro and mini versions of dog breeds of regular size. These dogs are dwarf by nature and have light-density growth hormones. They’re so small that they can be kept in cups, purses, bags, and hence the name, teacup puppies.

    Be it Twitter, Instagram, Media Shows, or Fashion Events; Teacup puppies are trending everywhere. Celebrities and Influencers are showing these cute micro puppies in their bag or purses, making all the noise.

    No doubt Teacup puppies are adorable and beautiful in their looks, but are you aware of the health challenges of their adoption? Do you know about their average lifespan? And most importantly, do you know if they can be suitable for you?

    Teacup Puppies are micro in size but require macro healthcare. Read on this article and learn everything about Teacup dog breeds!

    What Are Teacup Puppies Dog Breed?

    Teacup puppy or Teacup dog is a slang term used to define micro and mini dog breeds. In more straightforward language, puppies that can get fit in a cup are known as teacup puppies.

    You might not know, but Teacup puppies is not a term that is officially recognized by AKC or the global dog’s organization. Instead, it was used by advertisers and breeders to sell puppies to the buyer who wanted to buy micro dog breeds.

    Teacup puppy breeds are the micro version of their regular breeds with lower density growth hormones. Their growth halts after a specific size, and they remain dwarf throughout their life.

    What Are Teacup Puppies?
    Do Teacup Dogs Grow After A Certain Size?

    Teacup dogs are super small in their size and can be classified under the toy breeds category. There are many breeds of teacup puppies, such as Maltese, Chihuahuas, Yorkies, etc.

    Talking about the growth of Teacup dogs, they do not grow after a certain size. They are the dwarfed breeds; hence their growth hormones do not remain active throughout their lifespan. You might see them getting fat and gaining weight over time but don’t expect much from their size and height.

    How Big Are Full-Grown Teacup Puppies?

    Teacup puppies are not an official dog breed and are also not regulated by any animal welfare organization. Hence, their maximum size and height can not be defined precisely. Also, there are many teacup dog breeds that can vary in height and size. However, if their size remains the same after 2-3 years of age, consider them fully grown.

    How Long Do Teacup Dogs Live?

    As the growth cycle of Teacup dogs is a bit smaller, they suffer from many health problems. And as a result, they live smaller than their larger breeds of the same genetics. The exact Teacup dogs’ lifespan cannot be estimated; however, one can say they live for an average of 8 to 12 years. Again, the lifespan of teacup puppies depends on their active lifestyle, health issues, breeding process, and genetics.

    The common health issues of a Teacup dog can be:

    • High fever
    • Bone fragility
    • Irregular weight
    • Abnormal sleeping patterns
    • Hemorrhagic gastroenteritis
    • Irregular blood sugar levels
    How Long Do Teacup Dogs Live?
    How Much Do Teacup Puppies Cost?

    Teacup Puppies are rare and micro dog breeds that are rare to find and come up with a hefty price tag. Their price can depend on their breed, breeding style, breeder, gender, health, size, etc. You can find Teacup puppies costing between the range of $1500 to $12000 or even more.

    Below are the estimated prices of a few Teacup puppies breed:

    • Teacup Chihuahua: $1500 to $4000
    • Teacup Yorkie: $1200 to $3000
    • Teacup Pomeranian: $1500 to $6500
    • Teacup Mini Pomeranian Bear: $1500 to $5000
    • Teacup Poodle: $2000 to $3000
    • Teacup Maltese: $1500 to $3000
    • Teacup Shih Tzu: $1500 to $3000

    ***Prices are checked from various Craigslist classified ads. It may differ according to their location and multiple factors.

    Where To Buy Teacup Puppy?

    There are many breeds of teacup puppies, but they are hard to find in open markets or dog shelters. Very few breeders breed these micro dogs intending to make the most money from their sale. Locating these breeders is slightly challenging as they’re not registered to breed teacup dogs.

    To buy Teacup puppies, you can look out on classified ads on Craigslist or request your nearby dog shelters to inform you if they get one for sale. But remember, teacup puppies are pretty expensive, and sometimes the sellers even ask for large sums of money.

    Should You Consider Buying A Teacup Puppy?

    Teacup puppies are becoming more popular these days and attracting many buyers. They are often treated as showcasing and fashion accessories rather than living pets.

    As their breeding style is unique, they suffer from multiple health problems throughout their life. The more concerning part is their breeding is not regulated by any organization and not monitored anywhere.

    So, if you’re considering buying a Teacup puppy for yourself, prepare yourself to take extreme care of your micro buddy. They might suffer from multiple health issues, and that all will add up to their living expenses. Moreover, there is no guarantee that your dog will not grow further, as it’s hard to predict their growing nature.

    However, if you’re positive about buying a teacup dog, you must go through a trusted and reliable dog breeder. While securing a deal via Craigslist, always talk thoroughly to the pet parent to know everything about that dog breed. Ask about their eating habits, last year’s vet checkups, sleeping pattern, health issues, etc.

    The Bottom Line

    While getting a Teacup dog seems exciting, it comes with many challenges. Proper research about the breed you want to buy becomes even more critical when there is no appropriate information available on the internet. Make sure to get the best teacup dog breed for yourself without falling into any money scam traps.

  • 10 Best Products for Dogs Recovering from IVDD Surgery
    25 May 2022

    Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) is a diagnosis that all dog owners dread. We (Mike and Steph) unfortunately saw our beautiful long-haired dachshund Django go through IVDD surgery earlier this year after suffering a serious back injury. Django is now in the recovery process and fortunately getting stronger every day.

    IVDD is one of the most common causes of back injury in dogs and is sometimes described as a slipped, bulging, ruptured, or herniated disc. It often affects Chondrodystrophic breeds like dachshunds, corgis, and basset hounds—dogs that often have short legs and long backs and are most susceptible to prematurely aged disks. Of course, even non-chondrodystrophic dog breeds grow more susceptible to back problems as they age and can therefore suffer from IVDD.

    In most cases, dogs with IVDD will recover fully and live happy, normal, and active lives. Of course, the path to recovery after an IVDD diagnosis is never easy. Dogs with IVDD always need strict crate rest, and many also need complicated and expensive back surgery like our sausage dog Django.

    While recovering, your dog's movement must be restricted to a crate or pen, and he or she may not be able to walk without support. Your pup may also experience incontinence for several weeks and need help going to the bathroom via bladder expression. In other words, the recovery process can be difficult and daunting for us loving dog parents.

    Fortunately, there are dog products on the market that help make your dog's IVDD journey and recovery easier. Here are 10 products that Mike and I found helpful and essential throughout Django's IVDD recovery.

    10 Best Products for Dogs Recovering from IVDD Surgery 1. MIDWEST HOMES | DOUBLE DOOR FOLDING WIRE DOG CRATE WITH LEAK-PROOF PAN

    After a dog is diagnosed with IVDD, strict crate rest is essential. Whether your dog has a mild IVDD diagnosis or is recovering from IVDD surgery, limiting his or her movement is incredibly important and will help prevent the IVDD symptoms and injury from getting worse.

    Consider investing in a high quality and reasonably priced dog crate like MidWest Homes' Double Door Folding Wire Dog Crate. This is the exact crate we have for Django.

    This suitcase-style crate has both front and side access doors, easy-to-use slide-bolt latches, and a removable and leak-proof pan. It also has roller feet that will keep your floors scratch-free. There is an optional plastic divider panel that lets you section off a sleeping space your recovering pooch. The crate comes in 7 different sizes. For reference, we own the 36 inch long crate for Django.

    2. DJANGO | ADVENTURE DOG HARNESS

    Dogs recovering from IVDD need a lightweight, padded, supportive, and comfortable dog harness. For dogs recovery from surgery, the harness must also not interfere with the incision scar.

    Named the Best Everyday Wear Harness for Dachshunds by Dachshunds Station, our Adventure Dog harness is a wonderful option for most small and medium-sized pups recovering from IVDD. The deep and narrow dog harness body is padded and lightweight and designed to prevent chafing.

    The back-clip dog harness features a lightweight webbing back panel that does not extend more than a few inches. This makes it a wonderful option for dogs whose incision is midway down the back (or lower) as it will not interfere with the sensitive and healing incision area. The dual side-release buckles also allow you to secure the harness around your pup's body without lifting his or her weak and unstable legs.

    DJANGO dog harnesses are available on both djangobrand.com and Amazon (amazon.com/django) with free U.S. shipping.

    3. GINGERLEAD | DOG SUPPORT & REHAB SLING HARNESS

    This neoprene support sling was a lifesaver for Mike and I after Django's surgery. The sling gently loops under the dog, just in front oft the back legs, and provides ample support when your dog's back legs are wobbly, dragging, and/or not functioning at all. The GingerLead also allows the dog walker to stand upright when supporting a recovering dog.

    Made in Colorado, this unisex lifting aid adjusts from 28-69 inches and has a padded handle and a 1.5-by-6 inch belly support pad. It comes in various sizes for small, medium, and large dogs. The mobility-assistance leash also seamlessly connects to our IVDD-friendly dog harness.

    4. GLAD | ACTIVATED CHARCOAL PUPPY TRAINING PADS

    One of the most difficult parts of Django's recovery was dealing with his incontinence in the first two weeks immediately after his IVDD surgery. Glad’s Activated Charcoal Training Pads will make dealing with any incontinence issues easier on both you and your dog.

    These disposable potty training pads boast a five-layer design to maximize absorbency. An activated carbon layer also neutralizes odors. Each pad features a leak-proof polyethylene liner and a quilted top with a built-in pheromone attractant. 

    Although accidents will undoubtedly happen during your dog's IVDD recovery, at least these pads will keep your pup's crate clean and make your life easier in the process.

    5. EARTH RATED | LAVENDER-SCENTED DOG WIPES

    While it is not a glamorous task, washing your dog's lower belly and butt will be necessary if he cannot hold in his pee or poop after IVDD surgery. These lavender-scented wipes are very effective for post-IVDD surgery cleansing, wiping, and scrub downs. They are formulated with all-natural shea butter, aloe vera, and chamomile and are gentle on your dog's sensitive skin and nether regions.

    6. PET ZONE | DESIGNER ADJUSTABLE ELEVATED DOG BOWLS

    This double diner is perfect for pups recovering from IVDD surgery. With 3 different height options (i.e., 2.7 inches, 8 inches, and 12 inches), it eliminates unnecessary neck and back strain. The Pet Zone Elevated Feeder also has two stainless steel bowls. They hold 7 cups of fresh dog food, raw dog food, dry dog food, or water. For post-meal cleanups, the removable food bowls can be put in the dishwasher. The durable plastic stand can also be given a quick once-over with a multi-purpose disinfecting wipe. Bonus: this raised feeder has collapsible legs. Simply tuck them under the feeding platform and take the feeder on outdoor adventures (or just to another room).

    7. NORTH STATES | TODDLEROO 8-PANEL SUPERYARD COLORPLAY

    One of the most important parts of IVDD recovery is limiting your dog's movement so he or she doesn't get re-injured. We use this brightly-colored, heavy-duty plastic play yard for our dachshund Django. The 8-panel dog pen gives him room to walk and play with plush dog toys while keeping him restricted to a safe space. This is especially handy when we are not supervising him and need a spacious and safe space for him to relax.

    This lightweight pet playpen stands 26 inches tall and encloses 34.4 square feet. With the Superyard Wall Mount Kit, you can even use it as a dog gate, giving you a 16-38 square foot barricade. The North States Superyard can also be set up in seconds. Made in the U.S., it has skid-resistant pads and a convenient carry strap, so it can easily be moved indoors or outside.

    8. DJANGO | DOG CARRIER BAG

    If your dog is anything like our pup Django, he or she may try to excitedly squirm out of your arms when you are carrying them. To prevent your pup from twisting in your arms and re-injuring their back during the IVDD recovery process, consider investing in a high quality, sturdy dog carrier bag like this waxed canvas and leather one.

    DJANGO’s Dog Carrier Bag is the safest way to carry your rehabilitating dachshund up and down steep stairs and across slippery services. This pet travel tote features a bag-to-harness safety tether. Unlike other dog bags which bag sag, this one has a very sturdy sherpa footpad that supports your dog's weight and spine.

    This dog carrier bag was named the "Best Dog Carrying Bag Overall" by Business Insider, and it is easy to see why. It is available in three colors (i.e., black, navy blue, and olive green) and two sizes: medium (for dogs up to 15 lbs) and large (for dogs up to 30 lbs).

    9. BESTPET | 3 WHEEL DOG STROLLER

    While your eager-to-play dachshund should not roam outside after back surgery, this three-wheeled dog stroller can provide a stimulating view of the outdoors. The 11-pound collapsible pet stroller has a roomy interior. It also has a hooded peak-top window that will give your pup an excellent standing view.

    With a water-resistant exterior, this BestPet stroller is the easiest way to transport your pooch in and out of the vet’s office for IVDD checkups. This best-selling dog stroller boasts a large undercarriage. It lets you bring along comforting dog toys and healthy dog treats. It also has a padded foam handlebar and two coffee cup holders. That means you will not have to eke through IVDD physical therapy without your morning joe. 

    10. KONG | CLASSIC DOG CHEW TOY

    KONG's Classic Dog Toy will help your recovering dog release pent-up energy and provide must-needed stimulation during long hours of extended crate rest.

    The natural red rubber dog toy has a hollow center that can be filled with high-quality dry dog food or dog treats. To keep your dog from running after pieces of scattered kibble, soak them in water for at least 30 minutes. To seal the filling, smear meat-based baby food or wet dog food over the KONG’s opening. Want to make a long-lasting frozen treat? Stuff the KONG with fat-free yogurt, and put it in a plastic bag. After 2 hours, remove this interactive dog toy from the freezer and briefly wipe it down with a warm damp cloth.

    ABOUT DJANGO

    DJANGO engineers high quality, modern, and durable travel and adventure gear for dogs and dog owners. Our mission is to help you and your dog get outside, travel and adventure more often.

    DJANGO Dog Blog is a U.S. dog blog focusing on domestic and international pet travel, dog health, and dog training. Named as one of the top 15 U.S. dog blogs by FeedSpot, DJANGO Dog Blog also reviews and highlights high quality pet supplies, accessories, and products.

    Follow DJANGO on Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and Pinterest. Learn more about our long-haired “tweenie” dachshund Django here.

    ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
  • Pamela Anderson Starts Dog Walking Side Gig For Her “Dose Of Dogs”
    25 May 2022

    Actress Pamela Anderson isn’t just known for her beauty. She’s also an animal advocate! The Baywatch star currently has four rescue dogs at her home in Vancouver Island, Canada. However, Anderson is currently in New York City playing the role of Roxie Hart in Chicago. Sadly, she was unable to bring her pups to the city with her.

    So, Anderson is desperate to spend time with some canine companions. As a way to get her “dose of dogs,” she decided to become a dog walker on the side. She now has a furry friend in New York that she walks with daily!

    FacebookOne Lucky Pooch

    Anderson is in New York for an 8-week run of the Broadway show, which is too long for her to be away from dogs. She sees plenty of pups during her daily jogs through Central Park, but that isn’t enough for her. If she can’t have her dogs with her, then she decided that bonding with a new furry friend would be the next best thing.

    So, Anderson asked her assistant if they knew of anyone in the city looking for a dog walker. Sure enough, her assistant had a friend looking for someone to walk their Irish Setter named Dash. Anderson happily agreed to do it and didn’t expect any money in return. Spending quality time with the canine was enough payment for her.

    YouTube

    When the celebrity arrived for her dog-walking gig, Dash’s parents were shocked. Dash quickly bonded with Anderson, and the two have been going on walks together for three weeks now.

    “Pam got wonderful reviews playing Roxie Hart in Chicago — but Dash is her biggest fan,” said Jonathan Walland, Dash’s owner. “He took an immediate liking to her. She is clearly a dog lover and a genuine pet person.”

    YouTubeFilling the Dog-Less Void

    Anderson plans to continue walking Dash for as long as she’s in New York. He’s no replacement for her furry friends, but walking him is the perfect way for her to get her “dose of dogs.”

    “I think she really misses her own dogs,” Walland said. “Being in New York working for a few weeks is bound to make anyone miss home — and being able to spend time with a wonderful dog probably makes Pam feel welcome.”

    YouTube

    The star’s Broadway debut will continue until the first week of June. Then, she’ll be able to head home to see her rescue dogs again. Her return is sure to be a heartwarming reunion!

    Featured Image: Facebook and YouTube

    The post Pamela Anderson Starts Dog Walking Side Gig For Her “Dose Of Dogs” appeared first on iHeartDogs.com.

Blogs Just Released - Dogs

Dog Training

Dog Training Blogs

26 May 2022

Dog Training Blogs Dog Training Blogs
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  • Case Study: Keen Part Two
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  • Dog Stress Part 2: Addressing Your Dog’s Stress Symptoms
    23 May 2022

    Some people believe that dogs have nothing to stress about. After all, if they're living in a good home such as yours, what could they possibly worry about? However, dogs experience a wide range of emotions, just like we do. They learn from their environment, and sometimes their past environments have taught them to fear.

    There are numerous dog stress signals and causes, which we covered in Part 1 of this dog stress series. Now, let's look at ways to deal with it.

    The post Dog Stress Part 2: Addressing Your Dog’s Stress Symptoms appeared first on K9 Basics - Dog Training.

  • Tails From The Field: Bobo’s “Unusual” Barking Problem
    23 May 2022

  • Training Dogs In Coffs Harbour
    23 May 2022
    Training Dogs In Coffs Harbour by Canine Revolution Dog Training
    Training Dogs In Coffs Harbour

    It's a universal truth that dogs are man's best friend. They're loyal, trustworthy companions who will always be by your side, ready to listen without judgment. There's only one problem with our canine friends: they're not always well-behaved. But even Fido can learn what is and is not acceptable behavior if you know how to train him correctly! Here are my top tips for dog training in Coffs Harbour.

    Why do we train?

    You've probably heard the saying: "If you don't want your dog to train you, train your dog." It's true that if you don't teach your canine companion basic obedience, he or she will probably do it for you. Teaching your dog to obey commands is essential for safety and also allows him or her to be a happy and well-adjusted member of the family.

    As a pet parent, it’s important that you use balanced training methods as outlined by The Canine Revolution Dog Training. Dogs respond best when positive reinforcement is used with short training sessions and frequent rewards like food or praise from their owners before moving onto pressure on and off and any corrections. When working with an instructor who understands this concept, many people find that group classes are ideal for meeting other dogs in the area while learning how to teach their own canine companions new tricks!

    Having a well trained dog is essential for a healthy owner-dog relationship.

    A well-trained dog can be a joy to have around, not only for you, but for your friends and family as well. Having a dog who responds to simple commands like sit, stay, come when called, and walk on a lead makes life so much easier!

    However, if your dog is unruly or disobedient you may find that it's difficult to deal with. In this article I'll show you how balanced training can help you reach better results faster than traditional positive only methods.

    I'll also introduce some tips on how to train your new puppy or adult dog at home, which will help make life easier during their first few months with the family (and beyond).

    We pride ourselves on being the number one dog trainers in Coffs Harbour. We have highly trained professionals that can assist you with any issue you have with your dog. If you are looking for a dog trainer, give us a call or visit our website for more information about our services and prices.

    Click Below to Book In For Free Dog Training Consultation in Coffs Harbour

    Ten Week Transformation

    The post Training Dogs In Coffs Harbour appeared first on The Canine Revolution.

Dog Food blogs

Dog Food Blogs

26 May 2022

Dog Food Blogs Dog Food Blogs
  • Jiminy's makes food donation
    26 May 2022

    Jiminy's makes donation in honor of National Adopt a Shelter Pet Day.

  • What You Can Do To Improve Pet Food Safety
    26 May 2022
    Report pet food incidents and ask regulatory questions.
  • Galam receives MAPA approval
    25 May 2022

    Galam product gets MAPA approval.

  • Insect proteins in pet foods: What’s all the buzz about?
    25 May 2022
    In this article, we will attempt to breakdown a myriad of information on the topic into a condensed status report—essentially, our synopsis of what’s happening and what to expect in the future.
  • How Do Bearded Dragons Stay Warm At Night? Do They Need Extra Warmth?
    25 May 2022

    Any lizard lovers out there will know that lizards are cold-blooded creatures and need to have a sufficient amount of sunlight and heat to function properly.

    Some forms of reptiles struggle to regulate their body heat and will often need some help to stay alive and comfortable.

    However, bearded dragons might be different.

    At night, lots of these reptiles will take precautions to ensure that they stay warm, otherwise they could become cold and very uncomfortable.

    Do lizard owners need to take extra precautions to ensure their scaly friend is sleeping soundly or is it best to let them get on with regulating their sleep?

    Follow the rest of our guide to find out what the best course of action is.

    What Is A Bearded Dragon?

    If you’re not familiar with bearded dragons, this might all seem rather confusing.

    So, before we delve into the benefits of letting your bearded dragon go to bed at night without needing any extra warmth, we should explain exactly what this little critter is.

    The best way to understand something is to research it!

    Bearded dragons are one of many species of lizard known as Agamidae (or ‘Agamas’).

    These animals can grow up to 1 m long, although most only reach around 75 cm.

    They come from Australia and New Guinea, where they live in tropical rainforests and swamps.

    They are quite common across the globe but are found predominantly in these two countries because they can adapt to climates where temperatures drop below freezing during the winter months.

    They are classified as arboreal lizards, which means they spend much of their time high up in trees and shrubs.

    As well as being agile climbers, bearded dragons also have excellent vision, hearing, and sense of smell – making them highly intelligent reptiles.

    What Is Regulating Body Heat?

    When we think about our lizard friends, we tend to picture them basking in the sun.

    But although they enjoy basking, they are still fairly cool-blooded creatures.

    To keep themselves warm at night when the sun isn’t shining, bearded dragons use a process called thermoregulation.

    This involves a creature’s ability to control its temperature by altering how much heat it generates internally.

    The best way for a reptile to do this is through shivering, which causes muscles throughout the body to contract and release energy.

    When this happens, the animal creates tiny blood vessels within itself, which then allow heat to travel to those areas.

    If this process proves too difficult, they can also produce sweat glands to remove excess moisture and toxins from the skin.

    Thermoregulation – A Brief Insight Into How It Works

    One of the main differences between reptiles and mammals is that reptiles don’t generally generate enough internal heat to maintain their body temperature naturally.

    Instead, they rely on external sources of heat to keep them warm.

    And when the environment becomes cold, reptiles will take certain measures to try and avoid becoming dangerously chilled.

    For example, if a bearded dragon loses its ability to regulate its body temperature, it may start to lose muscle strength and eventually die.

    Therefore, just like humans, reptiles can suffer from hypothermia if they aren’t kept safe and warm.

    On top of this, there are other dangers faced by reptiles such as overheating or overheating combined with dehydration.

    If they become dehydrated, they could even die from heatstroke.

    So What Does All Of This Mean For Your Loved One?

    In short, bearded dragons need to be kept warm at night to survive.

    If they fail to do so, they could easily succumb to a host of health problems, including:

    • Skin irritation
    • Muscle weakness
    • Dehydration
    • Kidney failure
    • Liver damage
    • Heart disease
    Bearded Dragons In The Wild

    Of course, not all bearded dragons live in captivity.

    Some wild populations inhabit temperate regions of Australia and New Zealand, where temperatures rarely dip below freezing during the colder seasons.

    However, they do need a way of keeping warm at night.

    But while some bearded dragons live away from human influence, others prefer to stay close to us.

    Some people choose to keep them as pets, whereas others simply appreciate their presence.

    Either way, you should always make sure your bearded dragon has somewhere comfortable to sleep at night.

    What Bearded Dragons Need At Night

    To ensure they have everything they need at night, you must provide them with some kind of enclosure.

    They won’t be able to properly regulate their body temperature without adequate space to move around freely.

    You should also give them access to water, food, and shelter.

    Since many reptiles require high humidity levels, you should also consider adding plants or moss to their habitat for comfort.

    While these basic needs are important, you shouldn’t stop here. To help your bearded dragon thrive, you should also regularly monitor its activity level.

    If they seem lethargic, you might want to check what they’re eating. Another thing worth considering is whether they need additional lighting.

    On top of this, you also need to make sure that you have some sort of temperature gauge somewhere in the enclosure so you know the temperature that your lizard is living in.

    Having as much control over their home is important to keep them alive and happy.

    What Temperatures Are Best For A Bearded Dragon?

    When it comes to temperature, most experts recommend that bearded dragons should be kept at temperatures between 65°F and 85°F (18-29°C).

    The higher the temperature, the better the chances of survival, within reason.

    But if you’re in doubt then the best thing to do is to contact your local vet and make sure you get professional advice on the best course of action.

    However, research suggests that a daytime temperature of 70°F (21°C) seems to work best for bearded dragons.

    So if you think your lizard looks chilly, you could raise the temperature slightly.

    Alternatively, you could use an infrared thermometer to see what temperature your reptile is experiencing at any given time.

    Options For Heating At Night Heat Rocks

    These can be used by themselves or inside larger enclosures. Simply place them in a corner and leave them there overnight.

    Their heat will slowly dissipate throughout the day.

    Heated Reptile Beds

    You can buy heated reptile beds online or visit your nearest pet store. These usually come complete with heating pads.

    Place one next to your bearded dragon’s enclosure and let it run overnight.

    Infrared Bulbs

    If you don’t like the idea of using heat rocks or heated beds, then you could try placing a battery-operated bulb near the end of your bearded dragon’s enclosure.

    This will create enough heat to keep him comfortable.

    Other Ways To Keep Your Bearded Dragon Warm At Night

    There are lots of other ways that you can keep your bearded dragon warm at night. One option is to build a small log cabin for them to climb into.

    You could even add a heater to the bottom of the box, which would trap the warmth close to your bearded dragon.

    Another option is to put a blanket over the cage at night. You could also cover it with insulation foam and place a fan underneath to circulate air.

    While these options may sound extensive, they all work in creating a comfortable home for your bearded dragon.

    Final Thoughts

    In conclusion, making sure your bearded dragon is warm at night is very important.

    By using different methods like heating pads, warm rocks, and even infrared bulbs, you can have complete control over the comfortability and the warmth of your reptile.

    However, you need to make sure that you do everything within reason.

    If you take too many measures to ensure that your lizard stays warm, then it might become too warm.

    Trusting your bearded dragon to regulate its heat is half of the job, you just need to make sure that you monitor their behavior and their health to keep them healthy and happy.

    If you can do this, then you’re in a good position.

    Frequently Asked Questions Does A Bearded Dragon Need Heat At Night?

    Yes, they need heat at night.

    They need the right amount of heat and not too much heat, so make sure you know what temperatures work best and try to keep control over them.

    How Long Should My Bearded Dragons Heat Lamp Be On For?

    The lamp needs to stay on for about 12 hours per day, but you might find that some days it’s more

    Can You Leave A Bearded Dragons Heat Lamp On At Night?

    No, this isn’t advisable. It’s too easy to accidentally turn up the heat too high, causing harm to your bearded dragon.

    Other methods work just as well and will make sure your lizard doesn’t feel too warm at night.

    After all, when you’re asleep, you can’t watch your bearded dragon yourself.

     

    The post How Do Bearded Dragons Stay Warm At Night? Do They Need Extra Warmth? appeared first on PetDT.

  • Do Turtles Have Nipples? A Look Into Turtles And Breeding
    25 May 2022

    When it comes to animals and breeding, a lot of people (surprisingly) often assume that it’s the same for all – that every animal has a similar sexual anatomy to humans that they undergo the same process but that is not true.

    Sexual anatomy varies from creature to creature and while there are some animals that care very alike humans when it comes to breeding, others are completely different.

    So, here we are going to discuss turtles and breeding because a lot of people have questions when it comes to turtles and their young.

    How do turtles feed their young when the mothers have a hard shell? Do turtles even lactate or have nipples at all?

    If you want to find out more concerning breeding turtles and how turtles care for their young, then keep on reading because we are about to cover these topics in detail!

    Do Turtles Have Nipples?

    This is a relatively common question and some people are often surprised at the answer – no, turtles do not have nipples.

    This is because, unlike us humans, turtles are not lactating animals. This means that they do not feed their young milk.

    Mammals are the group of animals that produce milk from special glands known as mammary glands. They have nipples that connect to these glands and act as a ventral opening for the milk to flow through.

    Mammals feed their young through breastfeeding, where their young will latch onto the nipple and suck the milk from the mammary gland.

    This process and presence of mammary glands is what defines the group as mammals and every animal in this category, from lions to dogs to us humans, follow this rule.

    When the female is pregnant, she begins to produce her own milk and the area around her nipples swell (we call this area the breast on humans, but not all mammals have ‘breasts’).

    Once the young are born, the female can then feed her young the milk she has produced through breastfeeding.

    There are only two exceptions to this rule in the mammal kingdom known as monotremes – the Echidna and the Platypus, both of which lay eggs.

    They do, however, produce milk from mammary glands but they do not have nipples.

    Instead, their young will suckle milk from hairs especially connected to their mother’s mammary glands.

    Turtles are not mammals – they are reptiles. This means that their breeding process follows the rules of reptiles and not mammals.

    So, turtles do not have nipples or breasts nor do they produce milk and breastfeed their offspring – these features are limited to mammals and are not shared with reptiles.

    How Do Turtles Care For Their Young? 

    To be pretty blunt – they don’t.

    Most baby turtles will never meet either of their parents because unlike mammals, they are not born through the same process. Baby turtles hatch from eggs and are not alive or conscious when they are laid.

    Turtles often lay their eggs on land or nearby water. The female will build a nest for her eggs when she is nearly ready to lay them.

    She will do this by digging a hole in the ground, laying her eggs inside (the number of eggs can vary from numbers as low as ten to as high as a hundred!), and sometimes covering it up again.

    This is to hide the eggs from predators who will eat the eggs for nourishment.

    Once the eggs are laid and hidden, the turtle will then wander away and never see her babies.

    Her part in their life is over before it has even begun – she has laid them, given them all the protection she can, and will go on to live her life until another breeding cycle.

    There are some species that will stay and guard her nest, but they will not stick around for hatching.

    Over time, the eggs will hatch and the babies will have to survive on their own. Luckily, they are born with the absolute instinct and drive to do this.

    They will already know how to swim and how to hunt for food without needing to be taught – meaning that there was no need for their parents to be in their life at all!

    What the baby turtles do next is dependent on their species.

    The most famous hatching process is those of sea turtles, who are born on beaches and have to scramble to the sea while birds and other predators try to snatch them up as snacks.

    Most baby turtles won’t make it and the mortality rate for the early period of their life is high – but honestly, there is not anything their parents could do.

    Until the babies grow large enough to be too big a target for some predators, they are easy pickings and there is not much a mother can do to protect all one hundred of her babies.

    So it is better for the survival of the species that she goes off and starts to prepare to lay another batch of eggs.

    Do All Reptiles Abandon Their Young?

    Abandon may be a strong word, but not all reptiles will leave their young before they have even hatched.

    Some species of reptiles like crocodiles and alligators stick around and help care for their young until they grow big enough to fend for themselves.

    They will provide them with food by catching prey for them to eat – but they do not produce milk nor do they feed their babies through breastfeeding.

    Only mammals do this. Other creatures like birds will lay eggs and feed their young regurgitated food or bring them prey to eat, but only mammals have nipples and feed their young milk that they produce themselves.

    They do this because their babies are often born without the instinct  to hunt for their own food and thus, they must remain to care for them.

    Most of the time, their stomachs are not developed enough to handle solid foods so they must survive on their mother’s milk until they grow enough to handle actual food.

    Turtles are not like this – their young hatch with the instinct to hunt and find their own food, meaning that they can fend for themselves from the moment they emerge from their egg.

    This makes their mother staying around pointless – they don’t need her to survive.

    This can be a difficult concept for us to wrap our heads around. After all, imagine a baby being born and then immediately standing up and walking out of the delivery room to find a house and get a job.

    Of course, this is impossible – human babies are not strong nor mature enough to support themselves and thus they rely on their mother.

    Baby turtles are not helpless. They don’t need their mother for protection or food – and so it is pointless for a mother turtle to have nipples or produce milk when her babies are already strong enough to find their own food.

    Conclusion

    So, if a turtle was to remove their shell, you would not find a pair of nipples anywhere on their body.

    Turtles do not have mammary glands because they are not mammals, they are reptiles.

    They never have to feed their young because baby turtles are capable of hunting and eating their regular adult diet from the moment they are born.

    So, the mother turtle only has to lay her eggs somewhere safe and move on – she is no longer necessary for her babies’ survival.

    In fact, it’s almost impossible for a turtle to ensure the safety and survival of all her children because she can lay up to one hundred eggs!

    It is better for the mother to move on and lay another batch of eggs to ensure her species survival as she would only be wasting her time trying to protect the babies she had already had when there is little to nothing she can do.

    So, mother turtles are not being cold or careless when they leave their unhatched eggs behind.

    This is just part of their breeding cycle that offers the best possible chances of survival for all turtles.

    The post Do Turtles Have Nipples? A Look Into Turtles And Breeding appeared first on PetDT.

  • Everything You Need To Know About A Sleeping Turtle
    25 May 2022

    Just like any other animal, a turtle needs time to sleep and rest. Like a lot of animals, turtles are diurnal creatures, which means they are active during the day and will sleep at night, just like humans.

    For turtles in captivity, you want to maintain a day and night cycle for your turtle.

    This means that the lights need to be in your tank for 10 to 12 hours every day and off for the same amount of time. This then follows a natural cycle of day and night that must be followed 24/7.

    Alongside that, you must make sure that the water conditions are right for your turtle for when they need to sleep.

    In this article, we will be discussing everything you need to know about a sleeping turtle. It is important that a turtle sleeps well, otherwise they can become stressed and that can affect their health and appetite.

    How Does Your Turtle Sleep?

    Not all turtles will sleep underwater, some pet turtles will sleep in a place that they find most comfortable.

    You will notice that certain turtles like to sleep on the surface of the water, while others will sleep in their basking spot. Compared with other species of turtles that are known to sleep at the bottom of their tank.

    Also, some like to float between the bottom of the tank and the surface of the water. There are lots of options for how your turtle may like to sleep. Although, it does depend on the species, as particular species like to sleep a more certain way than others.

    However, it doesn’t matter where in their enclosure or in their tank, your turtle decides to sleep. If they are in the water, then occasionally they will need to come to the surface for a breath of air.

    Certain species of turtles like the painted turtle and the red-eared slider can actually go for up to 5 hours without needing to come up to the surface for a breath of air. Therefore, turtles can go to sleep under the water.

    Turtle species like the sliders, musk turtles, painted turtles, map turtles and mud turtles are all known to sleep under the water.

    While species like the box turtles don’t sleep in the water at all. This type of turtle doesn’t like water at all and stays on land, as a result they need a dry and land based enclosure. Therefore, they also sleep on the land as well.

    Obviously, sea turtles sleep under the water. Aquatic turtles will have a very different sleeping pattern to land turtles and other types of pets you may have.

    A land or pet turtle will usually follow the same routine that you have, so they will sleep and wake up when you do.

    Compared with an aquatic species of turtle, it will often sleep under the water for around 4 to 7 hours. They then need to come up to the surface so that they have refilled their air supply. Then they can go back to sleep.

    Freshwater turtles in the wild like the map turtle are known to burrow themselves in moss or marshy grass to help them sleep.

    Some turtles also like to burrow under the ground when they sleep, as this offers them protection from any predators that may be lurking around at night while they sleep.

    Alongside this, the North American painted and musk turtle and the Japanese pond turtle have the special ability to be able to breathe under the water. This means that they don’t need to come up for air every few hours for more oxygen.

    They can stay completely under the water still as they sleep. This is because they can breathe under the water by using cloacal respiration, by using the muscles near the rear of their body.

    However, muck turtles use these muscles, which are located under their neck instead. However, when turtles are brumating, a lot of aquatic species of turtles use these techniques to allow them to survive the winter months with little food and little energy.

    As oxygen is so important for turtles, you need to make sure that the oxygen levels in your tank are very high. Otherwise, your turtles are going to struggle to be able to receive enough oxygen that they need while they sleep.

    If your tank is big enough, then you may want to consider installing a water pump or filter. Then you are assured that there will be enough oxygen in your turtle’s tank while they are asleep.

    Do Turtles Always Sleep In The Same Spot?

    While some species of turtles do tend to sleep in one spot, it’s not always the case. For example, the box turtle tends to sleep in a nest made out of leaves and twigs.

    However, if you keep your box turtle in a large enclosure, it will most likely end up sleeping in many different locations.

    However, sometimes a turtle will find a spot that will deem to be the most comfortable, and they may use that as their permanent sleeping area. Therefore, you will then notice your turtle always sleeping in the same spot every night.

    As a result, sometimes a turtle will sleep in the same spot, while others may change their mind every night. This differs from turtle to turtle, and it is difficult to give a definitive answer.

    Do All Turtles Sleep In Water?

    Not all turtles sleep in water. Many species of turtles prefer to sleep on land. As such, they will usually sleep on a bed of sand or soil. However, some species of turtles will actually sleep in the water.

    These include the mud turtle, the soft shell turtle and the leatherback sea turtle.

    The mud turtle sleeps in the water because it needs to get rid of its waste products. It does this by excreting through its mouth into the water.

    The soft shell turtle has a similar reason for sleeping in the water. It uses the water to cool itself down. It does this by having a layer of fat between its skin and the water. This allows the water to pass right through the turtle without affecting it.

    Finally, the leatherback sea turtle also sleeps in the water. Unlike the other two species of turtles mentioned above, it doesn’t need to get rid of any waste products. Instead, it just wants to stay cool.

    To achieve this, it keeps its body temperature at around 32 degrees Celsius.

    When Do Turtles Go To Sleep?

    The majority of turtles are diurnal, as we have mentioned above. Therefore, they are active during the day and will sleep at night. Although there are a couple of species that are believed to be nocturnal, this includes the common snapping turtle.

    For the nocturnal turtles, they will do the opposite and sleep all day and then are much more active in the evenings. However, the majority of pet turtles and turtles in captivity are diurnal.

    The reason that the majority of turtles are diurnal is that they need to bask in UVB light. The only time that they can absorb this light is during the day when the sun is out.

    However, even when turtles are basking, you may notice them taking a nap during this time as well as they absorb all the important nutrients from the UVB light rays.

    How Long Do Turtles Sleep For?

    Turtles sleep for different lengths of time. Some species of turtles will go to sleep within minutes of being put in a dark place.

    Others will take hours to fall asleep. However, it is known that turtles don’t actually fall into a deep sleep like humans. Instead, for turtles, the process of going to sleep is just a long rest.

    For aquatic turtles, they will have to come up for air several times in a night. However, some can stay underwater for around 4 to 7 hours, and they will just bob their head above the water to be able to breathe for those long periods of time.

    Some turtles can stay under for such long times, as the temperature is quite low. It should be around 70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

    These lower temperatures then affect the turtle’s metabolism and slow it down. Then with a slower metabolism they need less oxygen so they can sleep for longer without having to come up for air as often.

    On the other hand, tortoises can sleep for much longer than a turtle, and especially an aquatic turtle.

    Some land turtles like the Galápagos Turtle are known to sleep for around 16 to 18 hours a day. Therefore, they are asleep much more than they are awake. They are only really awake when they need to eat.

    Is It Possible For A Sleeping Turtle To Drown?

    This is not a corner, as a sleeping turtle can go for hours underwater without the need of oxygen and to breathe. When a turtle does need oxygen, it will naturally float to the surface.

    The only time a turtle could drown is if it gets trapped while underwater. Therefore, you just have to make sure there are no obstacles that could trap your turtle in the tank.

    For a baby turtle, it is recommended that the water level is only 2.5 times the height of the baby turtle. This way the baby can resurface easily.

    Why Do Turtles Sleep So Much?

    Some turtles will rest for long periods of time even when they aren’t sleeping. Although, if your turtle is suddenly resting too much or not being as active as normal, then the temperature may be too low for them and they are being too brutal.

    If the temperature is too low, then they will naturally sleep and rest a lot more to conserve their energy.

    In the wild, turtles will begin to sleep a lot more as the temperatures begin to drop and winter approaches.

    Water temperatures should always be kept at around 70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit. If the water gets too low, then you may want to consider investing in a water heater that can be regulated with a thermostat.

    If you are still worried after making sure the temperatures are all correct, then check with your vet to make sure that nothing is wrong with your turtle.

    However, it is important to note that the older a turtle gets, the less active they do become. So as your turtles get older, then get less active and much slower, so they want to rest and sleep more.

    Do Turtles Hibernate?

    Turtles are known to brumate, which is a turtle version of hibernation during the colder months. However, brumation will occur when the temperature in the turtle’s environment begins to change and get colder.

    This is because in the wild food is much more difficult to come by, and so with this cold weather and the lack of food, turtles struggle to hunt and search for food.

    Therefore, it is important that they conserve the little energy that they have for when the warmer months come back.

    Hence, a turtle will brumate during winter as they need less food and become much less active, so that they can survive and bounce back once the temperature begins to rise again.

    Both land and aquatic turtles are known to hibernate/brumate during the colder seasons. However, that doesn’t mean all species of turtles do brumate, but the majority do.

    However, turtles in captivity or as pets don’t need to brumate, as they don’t need to preserve any energy as their food is provided to them.

    Also as their owners regulate the temperature of their enclosure or tank, they shouldn’t need to prepare for any colder weather. Making your turtle go through brumation has risk as they can die in some situations.

    Therefore, if you don’t want your turtle to brumate, then you need to keep the temperature constant and high between 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Even during winter you need to keep these temperatures consistent otherwise your turtle will then begin the brumation process.

    Although, if you plan to breed your turtles then you may want to consider putting your turtles through brumation.

    Through research, it is known that brumation increases the chances of a successful breeding season. However, you need to be careful if brumation isn’t done correctly then this can lead to drowning, freezing, or starvation.

    Tips For Brumation

    Not all species of turtle can brumate, it is known that freshwater tropical turtles cannot brumate, so do your research. Ask your vet to look over your turtle before brumation to make sure they think they can survive it, and do your research.

    As certain species of turtles can breathe for different periods of time. Some are known to brumate for 6 months, while others only brumate for 2.

    Make sure that you prepare a space for your turtle to brumate. Some will brumate in water or in a box.

    It is known that some keepers will place their brumation turtles in the refrigerator as they need to stay around 45 degrees Fahrenheit, but they shouldn’t be frozen. Check on them at least once a day.

    Also, by opening the fridge door you are letting fresh air into the fire which means that your turtle will still be receiving enough oxygen so that they can survive.

    If you do place your brumation turtle in a box, make sure the box has holes so that the turtle has access to oxygen. Also check on the turtle every day, doing your best not to disturb them.

    If it is your first time brumating your turtle, then only brumate them for around 3 weeks no matter their age, to make sure they can cope.

    For any aquatic turtles, you need to make sure that there are high oxygen levels in the water as they brumate. You can do various things to improve the oxygen levels in the water by using waterfalls or fountains, air stones or filters in a pond.

    In a tank, you can use a filtration pump or system that will pump more oxygen into the water. Also, you should be changing the water as often as you can as well.

    Finally, you should feed your turtle well in the time leading up to brumation. You want your turtle as well-fed and nourished as possible.

    However, some studies have said that you should also fast your turtle in the month leading up to brumation. This will then get rid of any undigested food that is still in the turtle. This also decreases the chances of an infection occurring.

    However, you must always make sure that your turtle is well hydrated. Then, once they are ready, you should gradually drop the temperature of their tank or enclosure.

    The worst thing you could do is lower the temperature suddenly. You need to do it gradually by dropping the temperature by 1 degree until you have reached the desired temperature for brumation to occur.

    Always monitor your turtles’ health. If you notice any health issues, or stress, then you may need a vet to look over your turtle. However, make sure the turtle’s environment is clean and well looked after.

    Once your little comes out of brumation then you should immediately put them under a heat and light source so that they can wake up.

    Also, lukewarm baths will help them out of brumation and bring their body temperature back up.

    Final Thoughts

    It is known that land turtles and tortoises will spend the majority of their day sleeping. While aquatic turtles will sleep underwater, however, some are known to sleep on the dry land in their basking spot.

    Some turtles can breathe underwater while they sleep, and it’s natural for them to sleep near the bottom of the tank. They will float to the surface for air when they need to.

    You may notice that your turtle will choose a particular place to sleep and always sleep in that area. Usually a turtle will sleep for around 4 to 7 hours at night, but they are known to sleep in the day while they are basking too.

    If you notice that your turtle is sleeping a lot more than often, then you can assume the temperature of the water or enclosure is too cold, and they are going through brumation.

    If the water is below 50 degrees Fahrenheit, then a turtle will naturally start the brumation process. As a result, it is your job to keep the temperature of their enclosures between 70 and 80 degrees to stop this process from happening.

    Also, the older your turtles get, the more sleep it will want. However, turtles can live for much longer than humans, although once you’ve had a turtle more than 10 years then you can expect them to start sleeping for longer periods of time.

    We hope this article has given you the answer to all your questions about a sleeping turtle. There are many turtle species out there, and they all have their own different sleeping and brumation habits.

    Thus, it is also important to do your best to reach your selected turtle before you try to put them through brumation or if you are worried about their sleeping habits.

    Thank you for reading!

     

     

     

    The post Everything You Need To Know About A Sleeping Turtle appeared first on PetDT.

  • Do Turtles Need A Heat Lamp?
    25 May 2022

    Turtles spend a lot of their time basking in the sun or hiding under logs in the wild and in captivity.

    However, if you’re interested in keeping a pet turtle, you might be wondering: Do turtles need a heat lamp?

    In this article, I will cover some key information on a turtle’s temperature, including whether turtles need a heat lamp.

    Keep reading to find out more.

    Do Turtles Need A Heat Lamp?

    Yes, turtles require an external heat source, which often comes in the form of heat lamps.

    Turtles are cold blooded creatures, and they cannot regulate their body temperature themselves. Therefore, they need some form of external heating source to survive.

    The main purpose of a heat lamp is to provide warmth to the turtle, making them an essential for your turtle’s health.

    Heat lamps are used to warm up the environment inside the tank. This helps the turtles to stay comfortable during winter months.

    Why Do Turtles Need A Heat Lamp?

    The primary reason why turtles need a heat lamp is because they’re cold blooded reptiles. As a result, they can’t regulate their own body temperatures and must rely on external sources to keep them warm.

    Most reptiles live in environments with low ambient temperatures, and the majority of turtles live in tropical regions with tropical climates. Therefore, in captivity, they need some sort of heat source to keep them warm.

    However, in captivity, it’s hard to replicate these conditions without the addition of a heat lamp. As a result, heat lamps help you to meet the specific needs of your species of turtle so that they can live a happy, healthy life.

    Generally speaking the air temperature should be kept somewhere between 85 and 95 degrees Fahrenheit.

    That being said, it’s important for the turtles’ health that they don’t get too hot.

    Bearing this in mind, it’s essential that you get a reliable thermometer for your turtle’s tank to ensure that you can closely monitor the temperature of the tank.

    How Hot Should Your Turtle’s Tank Be?

    This largely depends on the species of turtle that you have! For example, tortoises and terrapins can tolerate higher temperatures than freshwater turtles.

    On average, a turtle needs their environment temperature to fall in the range of 85 to 95 degrees F to maintain their body temperature.

    However, there are exceptions to this rule. Some turtles are able to withstand much lower temperatures. For example, many saltwater turtles can survive temperatures as low as 50 degrees F.

    The water in your pet turtle’s tank should generally fall between 75 and 85 degrees F, and you can get water heaters to achieve this.

    At night, it is recommended that you allow the temperature in your turtle’s tank to drop about 5 to 10 degrees.

    How To Use A Heat Lamp

    To use a heat lamp, place it near to the bottom of the tank, preferably above a rock for your turtle to comfortably bask.

    You will need to make sure that the lamp doesn’t directly touch any water surface. There are many different brands of heat lamps available today. Some of these include:

    • Aquaclear® Heat Lamps
    • ReptiLux™ Heat Lamps
    • Zoo Med® Heat Lamps

    When choosing a heat lamp, it is important to choose one that has an adjustable thermostat. This allows you to control the temperature of your turtle’s tank with ease.

    Once you have chosen your heat lamp, you need to ensure that it’s directed toward the basking area at a perfect distance. This will prevent your turtle from becoming too hot.

    The lamp needs to be positioned so that the basking area temperature is a minimum of 12 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the tank’s water temperature.

    The hottest part of your turtle’s basking area can be at the higher end of the temperature range.

    For instance, if the hottest part of your turtle’s basking area is 85 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit, then the water can be 12 to 15 degrees Fahrenheit lower.

    This way, your turtle will be able to easily regulate their temperature by moving to different parts of their tank.

    The Benefits Of Using A Heat Lamp

    Heat lamps provide several benefits to your turtle. These benefits include but are not limited to:

    Keep Your Turtle Active

    When your turtle becomes too cold, their activity reduces significantly and they can even go into a state of brumation.

    Having a heat lamp in their tank can help your turtle to stay active during the day, which means that they won’t become lethargic or sluggish.

    Helps Combat Seasonal Changes

    In their natural habitats in the wild, turtles are at the mercy of the changing seasons around them. However, luckily for your pet turtle, this isn’t the case in captivity!

    Controlling their environment using a heat lamp can help your turtle to cope with seasonal changes.

    The heat lamp provides warmth when the weather gets cold, helping to prevent your turtle from brumating unnecessarily for months at a time.

    Reduces Stress Levels

    Turtles naturally experience stress levels throughout the year as the weather changes. Unfortunately, some of these stresses may cause your turtle to develop health problems.

    A heat lamp helps to reduce stress levels in your turtle because it keeps them warm all year round.

    How Long Can Turtles Live Without A Heat Lamp?

    There’s no getting away from the fact that a heat lamp is essential for keeping your turtle’s tank at an ample temperature.

    For a pet turtle, generally speaking they shouldn’t go for longer than a week without a heat lamp.

    However, this can vary hugely depending on the season, so it’s not worth the risk.

    It’s also important to mention that turtles don’t deal well with sudden environmental changes. Therefore, it’s best to replace their heat lamp as soon as possible if it breaks.

    A heat lamp, or an external heat source is essential to your turtle’s health. Without one, the absence of a heat lamp would welcome a wealth of health issues for your turtle.

    What Kind Of Light Does A Turtle Require In Captivity?

    Your pet turtle requires UV light to closely mimic the quality of light it would get from the sunlight that they would receive in the wild.

    You will need to purchase a UV lamp that is specifically designed for reptiles. This light will need to provide your pet turtle with UVA and UVB rays.

    These rays are essential for keeping your turtle as healthy as possible, and affect everything from their metabolism to their body temperature.

    If your turtle doesn’t get enough light from their heat lamp they’ll find themselves unable to produce sufficient amounts of vitamin D and they might develop a vitamin D deficiency.

    Without adequate vitamin D, your turtle will have difficulty absorbing calcium. As a result, they’ll struggle to build strong bones and teeth.

    UVA and UVB rays also help to support your turtle’s immune system. Without them, your turtle will quickly become very sick.

    For instance, UVB light is crucial to allow your turtle to digest their food properly.

    Without the addition of UVB light in their tank, your turtle will likely become malnourished and become very unwell. This could even be fatal if you’re not careful.

    What Happens If You Forget To Turn Your Heat Lamp On?

    If you forget to turn your heat lamp on for a day or two your turtle will be absolutely fine.

    However, if your heat lamp is broken, you will need to make sure that you find a suitable alternative to replace their heat lamp as soon as possible.

    As I’ve already discussed, without a heat lamp, your turtle won’t be able to regulate their temperature and their health will begin to deteriorate.

    Do Turtles Need A Heat Lamp On At Night?

    No, generally speaking you should switch your turtle’s heat lamp off at night.

    This comes down to the fact that it is a good idea to promote a natural sleep cycle whilst your turtle is in captivity, providing light during the day and dark during the night.

    That being said, there are obviously exceptions to this.

    For instance, if you live in a particularly cold climate, you might require another method of keeping your turtle’s tank at the appropriate temperature throughout the night.

    This could include a heater instead of their heat lamp, as it will provide them with the necessary darkness to be able to rest and sleep properly.

    Turtles are diurnal creatures, meaning that they are awake and the most active during the day. That being said, it’s not uncommon for them to be active occasionally throughout the night, too.

    How Long Should You Keep The Heat Lamp On The Turtle?

    The primary purpose of investing in a heat lamp is to mimic the natural day and night cycle that is crucial for a turtle’s wellbeing.

    As a result, you can keep the lights on for around 10 to 12 hours. Another option that many people choose is to mimic the sunrise and sunset’s time if you have the means to do so.

    This often helps to ensure that your turtle has a good night’s sleep.

    Which Turtle Needs A Heat Lamp?

    All turtles require an external heat source to remain healthy. Ones that require a heat lamp include but are not limited to:

    • Red-Eared Sliders
    • Yellow-Bellied Sliders
    Conclusion

    Turtle’s require a heat source to keep them healthy as they aren’t able to regulate their temperature by themselves.

    Hopefully after reading this article you have a better understanding of turtle heat lamps and why they’re important for your turtle’s health and wellbeing.

    Good luck taking care of your pet turtle!

     

     

    The post Do Turtles Need A Heat Lamp? appeared first on PetDT.

  • What Is a Kidney Stone, Anyway?
    25 May 2022
    The first thing you probably think of when we say “kidney stone” is “pain.” Kidney stones can certainly be painful for some dogs, but did you know that other dogs may not have any symptoms? There’s some interesting science behind kidney stones and how they’re formed — let’s learn more. They Start as Crystals Urine […]
  • Robots run cricket farm for low-CO2 pet food ingredients
    25 May 2022

    In one insect-based pet food ingredient rearing facility, very few humans will be needed to care for the six-legged livestock.

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26 May 2022

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  • How to keep you dog safe this summer
    26 May 2022
    Dog days of Summer 

    Sum Sum Summertime is finally here! Everyone is ready to stretch their legs, be it 2 or 4, and run outside! Summer can be an super fun time for you to spend time outdoors with your dog running, lying around, going to the beach, swimming and all the other fun activities that come along with summer. Here are some tips to have a care-free summer with your dog. 

    Can Your Dog Get Allergies?

    Yes! Allergies are very common in dogs. 

    The 3 most common dog allergies are: 

    1. Food
    2. Fleas
    3. Environment

    1. FOOD

    Food allergies can obviously occur all year round but we want to include it so you don't mistake a tick bite for an intolerance to gluten.

    Indications of a food allergy in your dog:

    Itchy skin. If you notice your pup scratching and/or licking his skin excessively, he MAY be suffering from an allergic reaction to his food. Dogs can be allergic to something as basic as chicken. Call your vet to see if she has suggestions. There are a lot of all-natural dog food companies out there that you may want to try.

    We like Clean Bowl Club where you can choose between chicken, meat, turkey, and dry or fresh food.

    Cocker Spaniel scratching himself in the shade. 

    2. FLEAS

    A flea allergy is a severe reaction to a flea bite. It can cause severe itching. The intense scratching can cause skin wounds. Some dogs are allergic to the Flea saliva.

    Your dog should be on Flea prevention all year round. We like Simparica or Nexgard but you can always ask your Vet for a suggestion.

    All flea and tick prevention comes specific for your dog’s size so be sure to make sure you get the correct dosage. 

    If you think your dog is having an allergic reaction to fleas, call your Vet immediately. They may recommend oral, topical or injected medication in addition to prescribing a topical ointment.

    Cute Corgi enjoy a romp through the grass

    3. ENVIRONMENT

    Environmental allergens are most often seasonal so you may notice a change in you dog’s behavior in the warmer months when she is spending more time outside, rolling in the grass and sniffing the great outdoors. Pollen, grass, mold and  dust, can cause an allergic reaction in your dog. The most common areas affected by such allergens are itchy skin, paws, and ears but can also be seen around the eyes and snout. If you notice your dog licking or scratching these areas excessively, call your vet. 

    Not as common but also can be signs of an allergic reaction is diarrhea and vomiting. 

    All skin allergies pose the risk of secondary infection. As your dog scratches, bites, and licks at his skin, he risks opening up his skin to yeast and bacterial infections that may require treatment.

    What to do if you want to treat your lawn with pesticides 

    Just like humans, dogs can have an allergic reaction to pesticides. If you ever let your roam free in a yard or park you will notice that he rarely simply walks around the part the way we humans might. Dog go full-on, rolling, lying, digging and shoving their snout into any nook and cranny. Even if you are one of the lucky ones who’s dog simply strolls and sniffs, their close proximity to the ground can cause them to inhale more fumes than us. 

    You never want to let your pooch free on a lawn that has been treated with pesticides. Even in the best of controlled circumstances i.e: organic product or you know exactly what has been applied to the grass, your dog can have an allergic reaction. 

    What are Allergic reactions from pesticides:

    1. Skin rash
    2. Nausea and vomiting
    3. Eye irritations
    4. Respiratory problems

    Call your vet immediately if you notice any of the above symptoms. 

    Recommendations for how long you should keep your dog off treated grass ranges from 3-6-48 hours. Ask your trusted Vet. 

     

    Tall summer grass can hide hidden dangers for you dog

    How do you protect your dog from Ticks 

    Unfortunately, warmer months also mean ticks are out in full force. Ticks are parasites and attach themselves to dogs and cats. No dog owner wants their dog to be bitten by a tick. 

    There are many tick-born diseases including Lyme disease, Bartonella and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    LYME DISEASE

    Lyme Disease comes from what we call a Deer Tick but also knows as the Black-Legged Tick. The good news is that the tick has to be attached to his host for about 36-48 hours in order to transmit the disease. That said, signs of illness can take 2-5 months to show. 

    The most common cases of Lym disease are reported in the United States in the Northeast, Upper Midwest and Northwestern states. That said, Lyme disease is found in almost every U.S State, Europe and Asia.

    Signs of Lyme Disease can be fever, lethargy, limpness and/or swelling of lymph nodes. If your dog seems “off” then take him to the Vet. A blood test can determine Lyme Disease. 

    In addition to many Tick preventatives out there such as Nexgard, Simparica, Frontline, there is also a Vaccine. Ask your vet if your dog is a good candidate. 

    BARTONELLA

    Bartonella is a bacterial infection that can affect dogs and cats in their bloodstream. It is carried by fleas, ticks, lice, and sand flies. It can cause fever, vomiting, diarhea and organ inflammation. It is most prevalent in in the South. Diagnosis comes from a blood test. If your dog has Bartonella he will most likely be treated with antibiotics. Just like Lyme Disease, there is a vaccine for Bartonella. 

    ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER

    RMSF is transmitted by the American Dog Tick and the Rocky Mountain Wood Tick (thus its name) and the Brown Deer Tick. Symptoms include fever, loss of appetite, swollen lymph nodes and joint pain. it is most prevalent in North, South and Central America.


    This dog comes running back when playtime is over.

    Is the beach safe for your dog?

    Just like the joy your dog experiences when she sticks her head out of the car window, taking your dog to the beach can be equally exciting for her! Freedom… new sights and smells…water…sand…endless digging…fellow dogs to play with… the list goes on. Mixed in with all this goodness are some doggie dangers. 

    Can you let your dog off leash on the beach?

    While many beaches do not allow dogs, most allow them to romp before 9am and after 6pm and some require them to be on a leash at all times. Do your research before you head for a day at the beach with your dog. 

    If the beach allows your dog to be off leash, make sure you do not have a dog who will simply take off running and never come back. There is nothing my dog Pepper likes more than a run on the beach. It’s her own party and she would run all day if I let her She runs back and forth and back and forth along the coast line. If I call her to come back she will not listen. BUT if I start to walk off the beach somehow she has some 6th sense and will come running. 

    If you do not have a reliable recall for your dog we do not recommend you letting him off leash on the beach. 

    Sometimes dogs like to dig a whole to get to the cooler sand beneath.

    What happens if your dog eats sand?

    Eating sand is very dangerous for dogs if they eat too much. A little bit will simply come out in their poop but if they eat too much, it can block their intestines causing blockage and a trip to the vet may be necessary. 

    Does my Dog need Sunblock

    Yes and no. If your dog has a healthy coat long enough to cover their body, head ears and tail then sunscreen may not be necessary. For dogs with sparse fur we recommend a pet safe sunblock such as Epi-Pet

    Should I give my dog a “Summer Cut”

    We are not sure when, why or how the summer cut started but the answer from all vets and professionals is a resounding NO! The coat and fur of dogs is designed to keep them warm in winter and cool/protected in summer. A trim is fine but do not expose skin. If you do, make sure you have lots of pet-safe sunscreen on hand. 

    This dude likes the game of catching the water from the hose. 

    Water water and more water!

    Dogs can sugar from dehydration and heatstroke. Make sure you have plenty of water on hand and if possible, a shady place for your dog to rest. We love the chic, convenient and well-designed Swell water bottle.

    Should You Protect Dog Paws in Summer

    Just like salt, snow and frozen ground can hurt your little ones paws in winter the opposite is true in summer. Hot pavement, and sand can burn a dog’s paws. If the sand is too hot for your feet, chances are it’s too hot for your dog as well. 

    Moisturizing your dog’s paws with a balm can help prevent cuts and cracking. There are many brands out there but the origin, tried and true is Musher’s. If you put booties on your dog during the winter months then go ahead and do it on those super hot days where you can feel the heat coming up off the pavement. 

    We hope you enjoyed reading. Now shut down your computer, put down your phone and get outside! 
  • Reasons Why Your Pet’s Dental Health Is Important
    26 May 2022

    When it comes to pet health, you need to concentrate on several areas. With more immature pets, a common concern is whether they eat sufficiently or too much. Worrying about their joints and bones is a common issue when they get older. Many people care about their pet’s dental health, even though it is arguably as important as the other areas.

    • Keeping your pet’s dental health is crucial. Here are five reasons why, so continue reading to know more about your dog’s dental health.
    Pain in the mouth

    While this cause for maintaining your pet’s dental health is not necessarily a life-or-death matter, it can hardly impact your dog’s quality of life. There are many disorders that dogs, cats, and other pets can get in their mouths that will cause them extreme pain. The absence of dental care can cause several diseases.

    • It can be hard to witness if your pet experiences oral pain, but watch for whether your dog has a problem eating. That can be an effective sign of dental health problems.
    Bad breath

    Like jaws pain, bad breath can be more than an irritation. Both can potentially cause long-term pain or damage. Healthy dogs shouldn’t have bad breath. Work with your vet if brushing your dog’s teeth or using dental chews doesn’t fix the issue.

    • Pulling plaque from your pet’s teeth is essential. Doing so can decrease the risk of tartar buildup. Tartar is much more intense, as no one but a skilled can easily remove it.
    Serious medical problems

    While your pet’s dental maintenance may seem like an afterthought, keeping your pet’s mouth clean can control serious medical issues that could leave your pet hurt or even dead. When plaque buildup becomes bad enough, there is a chance that specific bacterial diseases can cause more severe health problems.

    • Bacterial diseases can spread throughout your furry dog’s body. If the bacterial disease grows and repopulates unchecked by antibiotics or proper dental care, your pet could get in serious trouble. The disease could potentially provoke organ failure or death.
    Losing teeth

    While your pet may not start losing teeth immediately, failing to provide proper attention can cause long-term harm. Tooth loss leads to more intense problems since your dog depends on its teeth to eat, play and enjoy everyday life. Tooth loss can potentially be painful for dogs. Losing teeth might not be the end of the world, but it can make your pet’s life more challenging.

    Poor dental health can be an expression of other problems

    One significant reason to keep your pet’s dental health in check is that it will be easier to watch for other issues they are experiencing. If a pet’s dental health is top-notch, their mouth will not have any issues, and they will be capable to perform every function with no pain or difficulties.

    • Consider your pet begins having a different type of problem that could finally show signs in their mouth. In that case, you will know instantly that your pet is having another problem and not one that is occurring due to a lack of oral care. This can help you better observe your pet’s overall health.

    The post Reasons Why Your Pet’s Dental Health Is Important appeared first on HankPets.

  • 15 Dog Car Seat That Are Useful For Long Car Rides With Your Dog
    25 May 2022
    This article lists the 15 best dog car seat that is useful for long car rides with your dog. Do you own a dog as a pet? If so, Do you take your dog on a car ride? If yes, then you must need a dog car seat UK. The Dog car booster seat can […]
  • Dangerous Dog Virus Outbreak in Florida
    24 May 2022
    Veterinarians have issued another urgent warning to dog owners about the troubling spread of a rare but fatal bacterial illness that has been discovered in at least two states. A wave of leptospirosis infections has been detected in Sydney and the NSW Lake Macquarie region in recent months, killing at least two dogs and leaving …

    Dangerous Dog Virus Outbreak in Florida Read More »

  • Preparing for Dog Grooming Certification Programs
    20 May 2022
    Certification Tips Video Roundup
    Becoming a National Certified Master Groomer can help grow yourself and your business exponentially! Below are videos, podcasts and resources for your pathway to Certification Success!

    I Want To Compete with guest Victor Rosado

    All About GroomTeam USA with guest Kathy Rose

    Where Can I Certify?

    National Dog Groomers Association of America (NDGAA)
    International Professional Groomers (IPG)
    International Society of Canine Cosmetologists (ISCC)

    The post Preparing for Dog Grooming Certification Programs appeared first on Learn2GroomDogs.

  • How To Potty Train Your Dog
    20 May 2022

    Once you have your lovely new furry puppy safely at home, it’s time to start executing a training plan. One of the most important areas to cover is that of toilet training, in an attempt to get your new family member used to go outside as soon as possible. 

    House training a canine will take tolerance and consistency on your part, with the process taking about 4 to 6 months. This can vary depending on the dog, particularly if they have come from a neglectful home in their early weeks, where they may have become used to being indoors all of the time.

    Develop a Toilet Training Routine

    It is important to maintain a way that your puppy will soon get used to. If you start to adjust the routine too often, they will only become confused and the process will need to start again.

    • There are certain times when you should always let your puppy outside for the opportunity to go to the toilet. This should be; first thing in the morning, after meals, following a nap, before they are left alone in the house, and the last thing at night. For the first few months, while their bladder is weaker, you should try to let them out once during the night. Puppy train pads are good to have for overnights during the process.
    • Take your furry puppy to the same spot in the garden each time. They will remember the smell as their toilet area and should continue to return to this following train. If your puppy has an accident indoors, you should clean it as soon as possible, otherwise, they may remember this smell as their toileting place instead.
    • Try to attach a word to the toilet process so that they eventually associate it with going outside. Wee and poo are oldies, but goodies!
    • Remember that your puppy will need plenty of encouragement during these early stages. Shouting and punishing are not recommended, as this will only frighten your new dog and could encourage further accidents. 
    • ACAwarding with a treat is often a good way of telling your puppy it has done the right thing. Try not to overdo it though, as they will expect this every time they go to the toilet!
    What not to do in Toilet Training
    • Do not overfeed your puppy, as this can disrupt their digestive system and mean that they do not develop a regular routine.
    • Similarly, do not give them a diet that is unsuitable for their breed or size. This can again make their tummy react in a weird way. 
    • Never punish them for accidents. If they start to go to the toilet indoors where you can see, calmly lift them up and carry them outside to the appropriate place. 
    • Don’t leave the door open for them to go to the toilet when they like. Although this may seem like a good idea, it doesn’t teach them that they need to ask to go outside, it simply offers the garden as an extension of their indoor living space. 
    • Don’t forget that your puppy will need toilet training on walks too, in order to learn the appropriate places to go. Try to get up before them in the morning and take them to the walking area in time for their first toileting of the day. Be ready for a walk with Hank dog leash and some poop bags!
    • Don’t play games whilst they are outside waiting for the toilet, this will only be distracting and confuse them as to what they should be doing.

    Look for signals that your puppy needs to go out and try to act before they have an accident. Sniffing the floor, spinning around on the spot, becoming agitated, and disappearing into a room that they have previously toileted in are good indicators. With some time and patience, your furry puppy will be house-train in no time!

    The post How To Potty Train Your Dog appeared first on HankPets.

  • 12 Best Quality Dog Christmas Hat on Amazon
    19 May 2022
    Christmas is always incomplete without wearing the red Christmas hat. But how to get a festive hat for your puppy? No worries, today we have shortlisted the 12 best dog Christmas hat for your puppy. The way birthdays are incomplete without a birthday cake, Christmas is without Christmas hats and Santa. And now it is […]
  • 16 Dog Christmas Jumper You Can Gift To Your Loving Pet
    19 May 2022
    The dog is a member of our family. When we’re together, all of our worries and pressures fade away. Here, we list the 16 dog Christmas jumper which we can gift to our favorite pets. Dogs can calm us down and teach us to appreciate and love one another. Nothing can compare to their unconditional […]
  • How To Phase Out Treats When Dog Training – Best Guide
    19 May 2022
    One of the eventual goals in training your dog is being adequate to trust that they will do as asked without needing a food treat bonus time. Dog medicines are very important and useful when first introducing a new behavior to your dog, and are an essential part of good brace training. We would not …

    How To Phase Out Treats When Dog Training – Best Guide Read More »

  • The Complete Guide to Dog Kidney Disease Symptoms and Diagnosis
    19 May 2022
    Dog kidney disease is a very common disease in the world. It is caused by a genetic disorder that affects dogs’ kidneys. For a long time, there was no treatment for this disease. But now its nearly possible to cure this infection or disease when facing Dog Kidney Disease Symptoms Dog Kidney Disease Symptoms have …

    The Complete Guide to Dog Kidney Disease Symptoms and Diagnosis Read More »

Australian Dog blogs

Australian Dog Blogs

26 May 2022

Australian Dog Blogs Australian Dog Blogs
  • Common behaviour problems in pet birds
    25 May 2022
    More often than not, domestic birds will lead healthy lives. However, you may experience a time when some of your bird's behaviours will change & there is often an easily explained reason for this.  It is important to remember that your pet birds behaviour is a biological response to their environment  & is influenced by their emotions. Their behaviours may  also change due to associated growth, development & the onset of sexual maturity.  The most common behaviour problems that occur in birds are:
    1. Biting
    2. Feather plucking or picking 
    3. Screeching
    4. Destructive behaviour

    Fortunately, these behaviours are easy to resolve. Some behaviours are instinctive, some are learned such as feeding and others will be in response. It is a good idea to observe your birds behaviour to identify this. By switching on the bird's natural behaviours, you can often overcome the response behaviours.  Follow our top tips for help with these problems before they become worse.

    Biting

    When a bird bites, it is can be to grab your attention. Some birds that are

    handled frequently may start to bite if they have been ignored or not handled as frequently as they once were. Ensure that you handle your bird several times a day, outside of their cage to prevent this. Birds can also bite when their hormonal urge to breed becomes strong. This normally occurs around spring and your bird is just  territorial.  Birds will also bite as a fear response. These birds need time to respond to new stimuli such as a new home or a new person in the household. A good method to help overcome biting and to tame a biting bird is to place a perch in front of them and allow the bird to step up onto this. Reward them with a treat. This 'step up'  technique is useful for getting your bird in and out of the cage.

     

    Feather picking or plucking

    It is useful to rule out any medical causes for this behaviour, such as a skin problem. Respiratory issues and nutritional deficiencies  can be the cause & it's best to have your vet rule these out. 

    Boredom and anxiety are considered to see a response such as plucking or picking. To remedy this situation, you will need to support your bird's diet as well as the environment.  Consider adding a vitamin supplement to their diet  in conjunction with a well-balanced diet that includes seed or pellets, fruit and vegetables.

    Spend more time with your bird and encourage their natural behaviours that may satisfy their response such as adding a birdbath. This may encourage preening instead of plucking. 

    Keep these birds busy, provide plenty of toys that will allow them to turn on their natural behaviours such as foraging. A good foraging toy will occupy a bird both physically and mentally for hours.

    Screeching

    It is important to recognise that all birds will be vocal, however, if your bird is screeching it is normally a response behaviour.  Often a bird will screech or scream to get attention. While this can be frustrating there are many things you can do to remedy this behaviour. Ensure that your bird has regular interactions, time out of their cage is an excellent strategy and it is important to maintain this. Ensure they have plenty to do. Enrichment toys that feature different textures and materials are great. These allow your bird to shred and explore, just as they would in the wild. Foraging toys will also benefit a screeching bird, especially if these toys have some of their favourite food inside! 

    Make sure that your bird's getting plenty of sleep. Screeching birds benefit from having a cover placed over their cage to calm them down.

    Destructive behaviour

    Birds are highly intelligent and have been observed using tools to get food, can

    mimic speech and sounds, and, can problem solve. Regular interaction outside of the cage can help break up the day for your bird. Boredom is normally responsible for destructive behaviour, however, birds will hollow out a tree and shred materials in their natural environment too. Ensure your bird has the opportunity to do the same. Shredding and foraging toys are great, sandpaper and natural perches will also provide a more natural material for your bird to explore. If you address these issues, the destructive behaviour should improve.

    Remember, any course of action taken to overcome some negative behaviours in your bird will take plenty of time, persistence, patience, and care. The rewards in return will further strengthen the bond you have with your bird.

     

    For further information, call in & see us in the store, or email us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
    4/72-76 Station St Bowral NSW 2576
    PH: 024862 1175
    © weknowpets 2022

     

  • Pets of the Homeless Corporate Volunteer Day - May 27
    25 May 2022


    Pets of the Homeless’ mission supporting pet owners facing rising costs of living

    With the increased rate of pet ownership in Australia [1] and as the cost of living continues to rise across Victoria, Melbourne-based and volunteer-powered organisation, Pets of the Homeless (POTH), is furthering its mission to support vulnerable pet owners by providing them with essential supplies.

    In an effort to raise awareness of the increasing crisis, POTH is hosting a Corporate Volunteer Day on Friday 27th May where members from the Petspiration Group will lend multiple hands to help pack essential supplies for Victorian pet owners struggling to make ends meet.

    Items packed and distributed will include nutritious pet food and treats, and the Petspiration Foundation (formally PETstock Assist) has also donated winter dog coats to keep our four-legged friends safe, warm and comfortable as the temperature drops.

    Pets of the Homeless’ Founder and CEO, Yvonne Hong, says that the organisation’s corporate volunteer days are a great way for businesses to get involved and make a difference to the people and pets within their communities.

    “The rising cost of living in Victoria is placing pressure on pet owners and we’re seeing a number of them struggle to make ends meet, impacting their ability to provide basic care and essential resources that their beloved pets require,” says Yvonne.

    “With the help of other volunteers and businesses, we can maximise our impact and continue our mission to help keep vulnerable people and their pets together by alleviating the burden of providing essential pet care during times of hardship.”


    “Since our inception in 2015, we have distributed over 800,000 meals through our pet food relief program and extended our services to provide veterinary care as well as a safe shelter for pets via our emergency boarding and foster care program.”

    The Petspiration Group’s Managing Director, David Young, says that the volunteer day is an opportunity to support a like-minded organisation and help ease the burden on Victorian pets and their owners.



    “We’re proud to partner with Pets of the Homeless and support the incredible work that they carry out to help relieve the financial burden on pet owners across the state,” says David.
    “Pets are such an important part of our lives and struggling to provide them with essential care can be extremely stressful for owners.

    “Through this volunteer day, we hope to play a part in Pets of the Homeless’ journey towards making a change to the lives of hundreds of pets across the state.”

    Animal Medicines Australia: Pets and the Pandemic 2021


    About Pets of the Homeless

    Pets of the Homeless was founded in 2015 by Yvonne Hong to help keep vulnerable people and their pets together by alleviating the burden of providing essential pet care in times of hardship.

    Since inception, the volunteer run organisation has donated 800,000 meals to pets in need and has seen exponential growth over recent years. The organisation services metropolitan areas in Victoria and is now distributing to regional areas including Geelong, Rosebud, Ballarat, Gisborne and Kyneton.

    For more information, please visit petsofthehomeless.org.au

    You can follow POTH on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pothaustralia and on Instagram at www.instagram.com/pothaustralia/

    About the Petspiration Group

    The Petspiration Group is a leading network of pet care brands with a diverse portfolio of retailers, products and services in Australia, New Zealand and beyond. The Petspiration Group was founded by the Young family in regional Victoria in 1991 as Ballarat Product, and in 2002 became PETstock. Today the Group is led by brothers Shane and David Young.

    Since starting in Ballarat, the Petspiration Group has grown to include more than 200 stores, 3000 employees, 1.5m active customers and 20 brands in the pet, hobby farm, veterinary and specialty sectors. The Petspiration Group is committed to growing the business by leading with its core purpose of ‘coming together for the pets that inspire us.’

    MEDIA RELEASE, 25th May 2022
  • Boom in crossbreed dogs posing risk to animal welfare in UK
    25 May 2022


    Peke-a-poo: Boom in designer dogs creates the perfect storm for animal welfare issues

    A new study, led by the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), has revealed a huge demand for designer crossbreed dogs in the UK between 2019 and 2020 and has identified the main factors behind the increasing demand – including beliefs that they are more hypoallergenic, generally healthy, easy to train and good with children, which could be misconceptions based on current evidence. 

    The new study also suggests that this increased demand poses a significant risk to the health and welfare of these designer dogs due to high demand leading to poor breeding and to buyers unintentionally supporting puppy farming and illegal importation of underage puppies.

    Designer crossbreeding describes the planned mating between distinct pure breeds to create new designer dogs with catchy names. For example, a cross between a Pekingese and a Miniature Poodle would create a Peke-a-poo that could sell for much more than either of the parent breeds. 

    The findings of this study are vital to improving understanding on why the popularity of designer crossbreeds is increasing across the UK and subsequently for improving advice to the public on responsible puppy purchasing that prioritises canine welfare and supports safe and responsible breeding.

    The team comprised of researchers from the RVC, the University of Nottingham and an independent consultant. They used the online Pandemic Puppies survey to canvas nearly 6,300 owners across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, who acquired a puppy between 2019 and 2020, including 1,575 owners of designer crossbreeds. 

    The five most common designer crossbreeds in the study were the Cockapoo, Labradoodle, Cavapoo, Sprocker, and Goldendoodle.

    The team previously documented a significant increase in designer crossbreed ownership during the pandemic, from fewer than 1 in 5 puppies in 2019 being a designer crossbreed (18.8%), to more than 1 in 4 puppies in 2020 (26.1%). 

    This highlights a dramatic shift in demand towards designer crossbreeds in the UK population and suggests that designer dogs are now the latest ‘fad breed’ for puppy buyers.


    Importantly, the study found that the main drivers of acquiring a designer crossbreed puppy compared with a purebred puppy were perceptions that designer crossbreeds offered a size suited to their owner’s lifestyle (74.8% vs 59.1% for purebred); were generally healthy (62.1% vs 42.3% for purebred); good with children (56.0% vs 42.5% for purebred); easy to train (54.3% vs 36.4% for purebred); and hypoallergenic (47.1% vs. 7.9% for purebred).

    Additional findings include that owners of designer crossbreeds:

    ✔️  Prioritise convenient purchasing of their dog over welfare factors – being less likely to seek a breeder that was trustworthy or provided relevant health tests in favour of a breeder that lived within a suitable distance or had available puppies at the desired time.

    ✔️  Were less likely to be provided with DNA and veterinary screening tests for their puppies’ parents by their breeder - in part a result of fewer crossbreed owners asking to see any results or believing that there were no relevant tests for their crossbreed.

    ✔️  Were more likely to source their puppy online, via a general selling website or an animal-specific selling website.
    Designer crossbreed buyers also overlooked more ‘red flags’ during the purchasing process that put them at increased risk of being deceived and purchasing their puppy from unscrupulous sources. 

    This included placing a deposit on their puppy before they had seen it in-person, being less likely to see their puppy in person before purchase and being less likely to see their puppy with its littermates or mother when collected, despite the strong ‘Where’s Mum?’ campaign against puppy farming in the UK since 2015. Ignoring these important ‘red flags’ risks unintentionally supporting puppy farming and illegal imports of puppies, inflicting major early-life stresses on puppies that could have lifelong behaviour and welfare consequences.

    This booming designer crossbreed trade is also posing a serious risk to the overall welfare of these animals. This includes health risks caused by breeding without due regard to health, increasing the risk of inherited disorders




    For example, a reduced emphasis on pre-breeding health screening of the parents of many designer crossbreeds could lead to increased levels of debilitating conditions such as hip dysplasia in the Labradoodle (Labrador x Poodle) in the future.

    Other issues include a potentially increased rate of relinquishment of designer crossbreeds in the future, as owners realise the reality of their misconceptions. For example, designer crossbreeds are thought to be hypoallergenic (a trait sought after by almost half of this owner group), yet there is no strong evidence of this trait in studies of designer crossbreeds, and allergies have been cited as one of the top three reasons for dog relinquishment, often within one year of ownership. 

    Additionally, behavioural risks are increased as, in some cases, behaviour in designer crossbreed offspring is less desirable than the behaviour of the parent breeds, including increased levels of aggression in the Goldendoodle (Golden Retriever x Poodle).



    It is hoped that this study will help to build an understanding of factors driving the designer crossbreed puppy demand and help vets, sellers and the wider pet industry to educate owners on the importance of safe puppy purchasing and the risks to canine health and welfare if not adhered to.

    Dr Rowena Packer, Lecturer in Companion Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science at the RVC said:

    “The UK public are flocking towards designer crossbreeds based on perceptions that they are ‘off the shelf’ easy family dogs; trainable, healthy, and hypoallergenic dogs that fit into their owners’ existing lifestyles. Unfortunately, it is unlikely that reality will meet all of these high expectations, with little evidence to support these claims.
    “These misconceptions risk poor outcomes for both dogs and their owners in the future, including rehoming, unexpected health problems and bite risks.”
    “Would-be owners should avoid being enticed by designer labels and rose-tinted expectations, and instead conduct thorough research to help decide if these are really the dogs for them.”

    Dr Dan O’Neill, Associate Professor in Companion Animal Epidemiology at the RVC said:

    “Sadly, designer dogs often do not come from ‘designer’ breeding programmes but are farmed indiscriminately to meet the current craze for breed-crosses with catchy names such as Frug and Jackalier. 
    “Check out the seller before buying, visit your puppy several times before you bring them home, and always make sure you see the puppy with its mum.”

    This study was funded by the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW), with the original study that generated the dataset was funded by the Animal Welfare Foundation (AWF).

    References:

    Burnett, E., Brand, C.L., O’Neill, D.G. et al. How much is that doodle in the window? Exploring motivations and behaviours of UK owners acquiring designer crossbreed dogs (2019-2020). Canine Med Genet 9, 8 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40575-022-00120-x

    The full paper is available from Canine Genetics and Medicine and can be accessed here: https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40575-022-00120-x

    About the Royal Veterinary College

    The Royal Veterinary College (RVC) is the UK's largest and longest established independent veterinary school and is a Member Institution of the University of London.
    It is one of the few veterinary schools in the world that hold accreditations from the RCVS in the UK (with reciprocal recognition from the AVBC for Australasia, the VCI for Ireland and the SAVC for South Africa), the EAEVE in the EU, and the AVMA in the USA and Canada.
    The RVC is ranked as the top veterinary school in the world in line QS World University Rankings by subject, 2022.
    • The RVC offers undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in veterinary medicine, veterinary nursing and biological sciences.
    • A research led institution with 88% of its research rated as internationally excellent or world class in the Research Excellence Framework 2021.
    • The RVC provides animal owners and the veterinary profession with access to expert veterinary care and advice through its teaching hospitals and first opinion practices in London and Hertfordshire.
    For more information, please visit http://www.rvc.ac.uk

    About the Animal Welfare Foundation

    More information can be found at www.animalwelfarefoundation.org.uk

    About the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare

    The Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) is an international independent scientific and educational animal welfare charity. UFAW’s vision is a world where the welfare of all animals affected by humans is maximised through a scientific understanding of their needs and how to meet them. UFAW promotes an evidence-based approach to animal welfare by funding scientific research, supporting the careers of animal welfare scientists and by disseminating animal welfare science knowledge both to experts and the wider public.

    UFAW’s work relies on the support of members, subscribers, and donors. To learn more about our work, to become a member of UFAW, or to donate, please visit www.ufaw.org.uk

    MEDIA RELEASE, 25th May 2022
  • Pets of the Homeless Corporate Volunteer Day - May 27
    25 May 2022


    Pets of the Homeless’ mission supporting pet owners facing rising costs of living

    With the increased rate of pet ownership in Australia [1] and as the cost of living continues to rise across Victoria, Melbourne-based and volunteer-powered organisation, Pets of the Homeless (POTH), is furthering its mission to support vulnerable pet owners by providing them with essential supplies.

    In an effort to raise awareness of the increasing crisis, POTH is hosting a Corporate Volunteer Day on Friday 27th May where members from the Petspiration Group will lend multiple hands to help pack essential supplies for Victorian pet owners struggling to make ends meet.

    Items packed and distributed will include nutritious pet food and treats, and the Petspiration Foundation (formally PETstock Assist) has also donated winter dog coats to keep our four-legged friends safe, warm and comfortable as the temperature drops.

    Pets of the Homeless’ Founder and CEO, Yvonne Hong, says that the organisation’s corporate volunteer days are a great way for businesses to get involved and make a difference to the people and pets within their communities.

    “The rising cost of living in Victoria is placing pressure on pet owners and we’re seeing a number of them struggle to make ends meet, impacting their ability to provide basic care and essential resources that their beloved pets require,” says Yvonne.

    “With the help of other volunteers and businesses, we can maximise our impact and continue our mission to help keep vulnerable people and their pets together by alleviating the burden of providing essential pet care during times of hardship.”


    “Since our inception in 2015, we have distributed over 800,000 meals through our pet food relief program and extended our services to provide veterinary care as well as a safe shelter for pets via our emergency boarding and foster care program.”

    The Petspiration Group’s Managing Director, David Young, says that the volunteer day is an opportunity to support a like-minded organisation and help ease the burden on Victorian pets and their owners.



    “We’re proud to partner with Pets of the Homeless and support the incredible work that they carry out to help relieve the financial burden on pet owners across the state,” says David.
    “Pets are such an important part of our lives and struggling to provide them with essential care can be extremely stressful for owners.

    “Through this volunteer day, we hope to play a part in Pets of the Homeless’ journey towards making a change to the lives of hundreds of pets across the state.”

    Animal Medicines Australia: Pets and the Pandemic 2021


    About Pets of the Homeless

    Pets of the Homeless was founded in 2015 by Yvonne Hong to help keep vulnerable people and their pets together by alleviating the burden of providing essential pet care in times of hardship.

    Since inception, the volunteer run organisation has donated 800,000 meals to pets in need and has seen exponential growth over recent years. The organisation services metropolitan areas in Victoria and is now distributing to regional areas including Geelong, Rosebud, Ballarat, Gisborne and Kyneton.

    For more information, please visit petsofthehomeless.org.au

    You can follow POTH on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pothaustralia and on Instagram at www.instagram.com/pothaustralia/

    About the Petspiration Group

    The Petspiration Group is a leading network of pet care brands with a diverse portfolio of retailers, products and services in Australia, New Zealand and beyond. The Petspiration Group was founded by the Young family in regional Victoria in 1991 as Ballarat Product, and in 2002 became PETstock. Today the Group is led by brothers Shane and David Young.

    Since starting in Ballarat, the Petspiration Group has grown to include more than 200 stores, 3000 employees, 1.5m active customers and 20 brands in the pet, hobby farm, veterinary and specialty sectors. The Petspiration Group is committed to growing the business by leading with its core purpose of ‘coming together for the pets that inspire us.’

    MEDIA RELEASE, 25th May 2022
  • Boom in crossbreed dogs posing risk to animal welfare in UK
    25 May 2022


    Peke-a-poo: Boom in designer dogs creates the perfect storm for animal welfare issues

    A new study, led by the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), has revealed a huge demand for designer crossbreed dogs in the UK between 2019 and 2020 and has identified the main factors behind the increasing demand – including beliefs that they are more hypoallergenic, generally healthy, easy to train and good with children, which could be misconceptions based on current evidence. 

    The new study also suggests that this increased demand poses a significant risk to the health and welfare of these designer dogs due to high demand leading to poor breeding and to buyers unintentionally supporting puppy farming and illegal importation of underage puppies.

    Designer crossbreeding describes the planned mating between distinct pure breeds to create new designer dogs with catchy names. For example, a cross between a Pekingese and a Miniature Poodle would create a Peke-a-poo that could sell for much more than either of the parent breeds. 

    The findings of this study are vital to improving understanding on why the popularity of designer crossbreeds is increasing across the UK and subsequently for improving advice to the public on responsible puppy purchasing that prioritises canine welfare and supports safe and responsible breeding.

    The team comprised of researchers from the RVC, the University of Nottingham and an independent consultant. They used the online Pandemic Puppies survey to canvas nearly 6,300 owners across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, who acquired a puppy between 2019 and 2020, including 1,575 owners of designer crossbreeds. 

    The five most common designer crossbreeds in the study were the Cockapoo, Labradoodle, Cavapoo, Sprocker, and Goldendoodle.

    The team previously documented a significant increase in designer crossbreed ownership during the pandemic, from fewer than 1 in 5 puppies in 2019 being a designer crossbreed (18.8%), to more than 1 in 4 puppies in 2020 (26.1%). 

    This highlights a dramatic shift in demand towards designer crossbreeds in the UK population and suggests that designer dogs are now the latest ‘fad breed’ for puppy buyers.


    Importantly, the study found that the main drivers of acquiring a designer crossbreed puppy compared with a purebred puppy were perceptions that designer crossbreeds offered a size suited to their owner’s lifestyle (74.8% vs 59.1% for purebred); were generally healthy (62.1% vs 42.3% for purebred); good with children (56.0% vs 42.5% for purebred); easy to train (54.3% vs 36.4% for purebred); and hypoallergenic (47.1% vs. 7.9% for purebred).

    Additional findings include that owners of designer crossbreeds:

    ✔️  Prioritise convenient purchasing of their dog over welfare factors – being less likely to seek a breeder that was trustworthy or provided relevant health tests in favour of a breeder that lived within a suitable distance or had available puppies at the desired time.

    ✔️  Were less likely to be provided with DNA and veterinary screening tests for their puppies’ parents by their breeder - in part a result of fewer crossbreed owners asking to see any results or believing that there were no relevant tests for their crossbreed.

    ✔️  Were more likely to source their puppy online, via a general selling website or an animal-specific selling website.
    Designer crossbreed buyers also overlooked more ‘red flags’ during the purchasing process that put them at increased risk of being deceived and purchasing their puppy from unscrupulous sources. 

    This included placing a deposit on their puppy before they had seen it in-person, being less likely to see their puppy in person before purchase and being less likely to see their puppy with its littermates or mother when collected, despite the strong ‘Where’s Mum?’ campaign against puppy farming in the UK since 2015. Ignoring these important ‘red flags’ risks unintentionally supporting puppy farming and illegal imports of puppies, inflicting major early-life stresses on puppies that could have lifelong behaviour and welfare consequences.

    This booming designer crossbreed trade is also posing a serious risk to the overall welfare of these animals. This includes health risks caused by breeding without due regard to health, increasing the risk of inherited disorders




    For example, a reduced emphasis on pre-breeding health screening of the parents of many designer crossbreeds could lead to increased levels of debilitating conditions such as hip dysplasia in the Labradoodle (Labrador x Poodle) in the future.

    Other issues include a potentially increased rate of relinquishment of designer crossbreeds in the future, as owners realise the reality of their misconceptions. For example, designer crossbreeds are thought to be hypoallergenic (a trait sought after by almost half of this owner group), yet there is no strong evidence of this trait in studies of designer crossbreeds, and allergies have been cited as one of the top three reasons for dog relinquishment, often within one year of ownership. 

    Additionally, behavioural risks are increased as, in some cases, behaviour in designer crossbreed offspring is less desirable than the behaviour of the parent breeds, including increased levels of aggression in the Goldendoodle (Golden Retriever x Poodle).



    It is hoped that this study will help to build an understanding of factors driving the designer crossbreed puppy demand and help vets, sellers and the wider pet industry to educate owners on the importance of safe puppy purchasing and the risks to canine health and welfare if not adhered to.

    Dr Rowena Packer, Lecturer in Companion Animal Behaviour and Welfare Science at the RVC said:

    “The UK public are flocking towards designer crossbreeds based on perceptions that they are ‘off the shelf’ easy family dogs; trainable, healthy, and hypoallergenic dogs that fit into their owners’ existing lifestyles. Unfortunately, it is unlikely that reality will meet all of these high expectations, with little evidence to support these claims.
    “These misconceptions risk poor outcomes for both dogs and their owners in the future, including rehoming, unexpected health problems and bite risks.”
    “Would-be owners should avoid being enticed by designer labels and rose-tinted expectations, and instead conduct thorough research to help decide if these are really the dogs for them.”

    Dr Dan O’Neill, Associate Professor in Companion Animal Epidemiology at the RVC said:

    “Sadly, designer dogs often do not come from ‘designer’ breeding programmes but are farmed indiscriminately to meet the current craze for breed-crosses with catchy names such as Frug and Jackalier. 
    “Check out the seller before buying, visit your puppy several times before you bring them home, and always make sure you see the puppy with its mum.”

    This study was funded by the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW), with the original study that generated the dataset was funded by the Animal Welfare Foundation (AWF).

    References:

    Burnett, E., Brand, C.L., O’Neill, D.G. et al. How much is that doodle in the window? Exploring motivations and behaviours of UK owners acquiring designer crossbreed dogs (2019-2020). Canine Med Genet 9, 8 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40575-022-00120-x

    The full paper is available from Canine Genetics and Medicine and can be accessed here: https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40575-022-00120-x

    About the Royal Veterinary College

    The Royal Veterinary College (RVC) is the UK's largest and longest established independent veterinary school and is a Member Institution of the University of London.
    It is one of the few veterinary schools in the world that hold accreditations from the RCVS in the UK (with reciprocal recognition from the AVBC for Australasia, the VCI for Ireland and the SAVC for South Africa), the EAEVE in the EU, and the AVMA in the USA and Canada.
    The RVC is ranked as the top veterinary school in the world in line QS World University Rankings by subject, 2022.
    • The RVC offers undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in veterinary medicine, veterinary nursing and biological sciences.
    • A research led institution with 88% of its research rated as internationally excellent or world class in the Research Excellence Framework 2021.
    • The RVC provides animal owners and the veterinary profession with access to expert veterinary care and advice through its teaching hospitals and first opinion practices in London and Hertfordshire.
    For more information, please visit http://www.rvc.ac.uk

    About the Animal Welfare Foundation

    More information can be found at www.animalwelfarefoundation.org.uk

    About the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare

    The Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) is an international independent scientific and educational animal welfare charity. UFAW’s vision is a world where the welfare of all animals affected by humans is maximised through a scientific understanding of their needs and how to meet them. UFAW promotes an evidence-based approach to animal welfare by funding scientific research, supporting the careers of animal welfare scientists and by disseminating animal welfare science knowledge both to experts and the wider public.

    UFAW’s work relies on the support of members, subscribers, and donors. To learn more about our work, to become a member of UFAW, or to donate, please visit www.ufaw.org.uk

    MEDIA RELEASE, 25th May 2022
  • Park your old dog food with ilume - May 28
    24 May 2022


    Upcycle your dog's kibble with ilume 'Park your dog food' event

    Give your dog’s park a new life by turning your old dog food into park fertiliser – and get a week’s worth of ilume™ fresh meals in return.

    The dogs of Melbourne are in for a treat because pet health company ilume is hosting a ‘Park Your Old Dog Food’ event at Alma Park, St Kilda on Saturday 28th May, where dog owners can swap their dog’s kibble for a week’s worth of ilume dog food.

    After discovering that a whopping 70% of Aussie dog owners don’t know what is in their dog’s kibble [1], ilume is setting out to educate dog owners about the cons of kibble and the pros of feeding dogs freshly prepared meals.



    At the event, dog owners will drop off their dog’s kibble and pick up a fresh box of chef-prepared ilume meals. All donated dog food from the event will be repurposed into gardening fertiliser to give local parks and gardens a new life. 

    Humans will also score free coffee and ilume’s canine behaviour expert Laura V and ilume vet Dr Jana will be on-site at the event, sharing tips and tricks as well as conducting complimentary dog health checks.

    Registrations are essential. To learn more and register your dog, please visit the Park Your Old Dog Food event's page.

    Ilume dog food truck details:

    ✔️ Chat with ilume doggy behaviour expert Laura V
    ✔️ Free health check with ilume vet Dr Jana
    ✔️ Free coffee & ilume samples
    ✔️ Entertainment and giveaways

    How to redeem ilume food:

    ✔️ Be one of the first to register here
    ✔️ Drop of your old dog food at Alma Park, St Kilda on 28th May (8AM - 1PM)
    ✔️ ilume will turn it into park fertiliser
    ✔️ Take home a fresh box of ilume (14 meals)

    When: Saturday 28th May 2022, from 8:00am - 1:00pm

    Where: Alma Park, St Kilda (119A Alma Rd, St Kilda East VIC 3183)

    [1] Ilume’s Australia dog owner Market Research, conducted by Pure Profile.




    About ilume:

    Dogs deserve to eat as well as we do, so they can live healthy lives - and stay longer with us. ilume’s meals that work in unison with an ilume activity tracker and companion app can make that happen.

    For more information, please visit www.weareilume.com

    MEDIA RELEASE, 24th May 2022

    Related Topics:

    ilume launches chef-prepared meals for dogs
  • Park your old dog food with ilume - May 28
    24 May 2022


    Upcycle your dog's kibble with ilume 'Park your dog food' event

    Give your dog’s park a new life by turning your old dog food into park fertiliser – and get a week’s worth of ilume™ fresh meals in return.

    The dogs of Melbourne are in for a treat because pet health company ilume is hosting a ‘Park Your Old Dog Food’ event at Alma Park, St Kilda on Saturday 28th May, where dog owners can swap their dog’s kibble for a week’s worth of ilume dog food.

    After discovering that a whopping 70% of Aussie dog owners don’t know what is in their dog’s kibble [1], ilume is setting out to educate dog owners about the cons of kibble and the pros of feeding dogs freshly prepared meals.



    At the event, dog owners will drop off their dog’s kibble and pick up a fresh box of chef-prepared ilume meals. All donated dog food from the event will be repurposed into gardening fertiliser to give local parks and gardens a new life. 

    Humans will also score free coffee and ilume’s canine behaviour expert Laura V and ilume vet Dr Jana will be on-site at the event, sharing tips and tricks as well as conducting complimentary dog health checks.

    Registrations are essential. To learn more and register your dog, please visit the Park Your Old Dog Food event's page.

    Ilume dog food truck details:

    ✔️ Chat with ilume doggy behaviour expert Laura V
    ✔️ Free health check with ilume vet Dr Jana
    ✔️ Free coffee & ilume samples
    ✔️ Entertainment and giveaways

    How to redeem ilume food:

    ✔️ Be one of the first to register here
    ✔️ Drop of your old dog food at Alma Park, St Kilda on 28th May (8AM - 1PM)
    ✔️ ilume will turn it into park fertiliser
    ✔️ Take home a fresh box of ilume (14 meals)

    When: Saturday 28th May 2022, from 8:00am - 1:00pm

    Where: Alma Park, St Kilda (119A Alma Rd, St Kilda East VIC 3183)

    [1] Ilume’s Australia dog owner Market Research, conducted by Pure Profile.




    About ilume:

    Dogs deserve to eat as well as we do, so they can live healthy lives - and stay longer with us. ilume’s meals that work in unison with an ilume activity tracker and companion app can make that happen.

    For more information, please visit www.weareilume.com

    MEDIA RELEASE, 24th May 2022

    Related Topics:

    ilume launches chef-prepared meals for dogs
  • Hector and the Time Machine Book Release - May 2022
    24 May 2022


    The continuation of the bestseller story for kids about Hector the dog!

    Hector is wise, curious, adored by people, he loves travelling and adventures - who better than the dog Hector could be a child's closest friend and life guide? 

    His fans can now read the eagerly awaited sequel of his adventures. The release of this second book by author Renata Kaminska titled "Hector and the Time Machine", an adventurous trip to 2020, coincided with the World Day of Cultural Diversity on May 21

    This second book is a fast-paced, story about Hector the dog's adventurous journey, sensitive to the diversity of cultures, contemporary problems and threats. Attention parents, get ready for serious conversations and a series of questions about very important matters!

    This time, dog Hector travels back to 2020 on a time machine. In his journey around the world, he is an observer of important events and phenomena, including pandemics, climate change, Brexit, the BLM movement, multiculturalism and much more. 

    Just like a child, he asks questions and looks for answers to understand the complexity of the modern world. The book helps parents engage in conversations with their children on difficult topics based on their own values system ​​and knowledge. It is recommended for children aged from 6 to 13 years old.

    Beautiful descriptions allow you to move to the colourful and full of aromas of India, drink the traditional five o'clock tea at Primary Minsker’s’ house and finally take part in the Golden Globe Awards. Travelling to Australia during the great fire, because of human activity, motivates the reader to investigate the causes of climate change and introduces habits that save our planet. Children will fall in love with Hector, who will be happy to come back to common adventures and plan new ones.

    The book has received numerous reviews and the patronage of various organisations and institutions, including Westminster Children's University in London, Granice.pl - all about literature, A Child in Warsaw, City of Children, Children's Magazine, European Women's Club, Cooltura24 etc.

    For her crowdfunding project, Renata was also among the 5 finalists of the BOLD Awards III competition in the crowdfunding projects category. 

    The first educational book Renata Kaminska published called "Hector, A Dog's Story" in 2020 was published in Polish and English. 

    It is now also in Ukrainian thanks to a crowdfunding project called “Hector & Friends for Ukraine”. The book breaks the taboo of difficult topics in children's literature, such as war, death, attitude to God, discrimination, abandonment and much more. 


    The book was featured in Indian Robin Age, Australian Dog Lover, UK Your Dog Magazine and others. The book has been read in over 16 countries on 5 continents. It was also included in the mentoring program on dogs for children under the patronage of Westminster Children's University in London. As part of it, Renata conducts workshops on empathy development held in schools.





    You can take advantage of a 15% discount by entering the code HECTOR at www.hectorandfriends.com 
  • Hector and the Time Machine Book Release - May 2022
    24 May 2022


    Premiere! The continuation of the bestseller story for kids about the dog Hector

    Hector is wise, curious, adored by people, loves travelling and adventures - who more than the dog Hector could be a child's closest friend and life guided? 

    His fans finally can now read the continuation of his adventures they wanted. The premiere of the second book by Renata Kaminska entitled "Hector and the Time Machine", an adventurous trip to 2020, coincided with  the World Day of Cultural Diversity on May 21

    The new book is a fast-paced, adventurous story about the journey dog Hector, sensitive to the diversity of cultures, contemporary problems, and threats. Attention parents, get ready for serious conversations and a series of questions about very important matters!

    This time, dog Hector travels back to 2020 on a time machine. In his journey around the world, he is an observer of important events and phenomena, including pandemics, climate change, Brexit, the BLM movement, multiculturalism and much more. 

    Just like a child, he asks questions and looks for answers to understand the complexity of the modern world. The book helps parents engage in conversations with their children on difficult topics based on their own values system ​​and knowledge. 

    Beautiful descriptions allow you to move to the colourful and full of aromas of India, drink the traditional five o'clock tea at Primary Minsker’s’ house and finally take part in the Golden Globe Awards. Travelling to Australia during the great fire, because of human activity, motivates the reader to investigate the causes of climate change and introduces habits that save our planet. Children will fall in love with Hector, who will be happy to come back to common adventures and plan new ones.

    The book has received numerous reviews and the patronage of various organisations and institutions, including Westminster Children's University in London, Granice.pl - all about literature, A Child in Warsaw, City of Children, Children's Magazine, European Women's Club, Cooltura24 etc.

    For her crowdfunding project, Renata was also among the 5 finalists of the BOLD Awards III competition in the crowdfunding projects category. 

    The first educational book Renata Kaminska published called "Hector, A Dog Story" in 2020 was published in Polish and English. 

    It is now also in Ukrainian thanks to a crowdfunding project called “Hector & Friends for Ukraine”. The book breaks the taboo of difficult topics in children's literature, such as war, death, attitude to God, discrimination, abandonment and much more. 

    The book was featured in Indian Robin Age, Australian Dog Lover, UK Your Dog Magazine and others. The book has been read in over 16 countries on 5 continents. It was also included in the mentoring program on dogs for children under the patronage of Westminster Children's University in London. As part of it, Renata conducts workshops on empathy development held in schools.





    You can take advantage of a 15% discount by entering the code HECTOR code at www.hectorandfriends.com 
  • Anaphylaxis in Dogs: Symptoms, Causes & Treatment
    23 May 2022

    An anaphylactic reaction otherwise known as anaphylaxis is an immediate severe allergic reaction caused by an exposure to a foreign substance.

    We have teamed up with Dr Lisa Smart from the Small Animal Specialist Hospital (SASH) to learn more about anaphylaxis in dogs – its symptoms, causes and what treatments are available.

    Dr Smart has completed a PhD in Emergency Medicine. Her current research interests include shock, coagulation, fluid therapy and anaphylaxis. She is a specialist in emergency medicine and critical care - i.e. a vet who specialises in treating the most unstable and time sensitive patients - at SASH Central Coast.

    What is anaphylaxis?

    Anaphylaxis is a very serious and sudden reaction, in which the body becomes oversensitive to a foreign substance. In dogs, the syndrome may present in a variety of forms. 

    This may affect the cardiovascular system in the form of low blood pressure or have gastrointestinal effects causing vomiting and/or diarrhoea. Other recognised symptoms include the dermatological signs that present in the form of welts and/or itchy skin, or difficulties breathing.

    What causes anaphylaxis in dogs?

    There are a number of allergies that can cause an anaphylactic reaction in dogs. 

    From a study that was conducted in Perth, almost 50% of cases presented were caused by insect stings, 4% due to an adverse reaction to medication and the remaining from unknown causes. 

    Bees, wasps, and ants are among the insects whose venom can contain a variety of chemicals, including toxins and allergenic substances that when exposed to dogs can cause sensitivity. 

    Due to the allergy of the foreign substance, the anaphylactic reaction is the immune system reacting in defence of the sting, medicine, or other unknown cause. There also may be additional chemicals in the venom of insects that activates the immune system or cause tissue damage.

    In this particular study, the median age of the dogs was 1.2 years, however, dogs of any age can be affected. 

    Dogs may develop the syndrome later in life and anecdotally, it has been noted that subsequent reactions may increase in severity if affected again

    Yet, some pets have an anaphylactic reaction once and then may never again experience the condition. It may be thought that puppies are more susceptible to the syndrome, however, this is not the case. 

    Puppies, with their playful natures and curiosity, place themselves more often in the proximity of insects. However, one breed that does stand out is the Dachshund breed; there is some evidence that they seem particularly susceptible to insect sting anaphylaxis

    Over the length of the study conducted from 2006 – 2018, the prevalence of anaphylaxis in dogs remained at a steady rate.

    What are the symptoms of anaphylactic reaction?

    Recent studies have defined the syndrome involving at least two organ systems ranging from dermatological, respiratory, cardiovascular, or gastrointestinal signs. For pet owners and treating veterinarians, the well-known symptom - changes to skin when a dog is experiencing anaphylaxis - is more easily identified than internal symptoms.

    Here are the main signs to look out for if you suspect your dog is experiencing anaphylaxis:

    ✔️ Vomiting
    ✔️ Intense bowel movements
    ✔️ Unsteady movement or wobbling as they are walking
    ✔️ Shaking or convulsion of the body
    ✔️ Facial swelling
    ✔️ Rashes developing on skin
    ✔️ Welts breaking out on the body

    Approximately 75% of dogs with anaphylaxis have changes to the skin, 76% have gastrointestinal symptoms and 69% have changes to their blood circulation (or shock). 

    Anecdotally, when vets across Australia have discussed these types of cases, there appears to be variation in number of cases seen and the severity of reactions. It is thought that the bees in the Perth region, where this large study was based, are particularly vicious, based on the cases seen in this region. 

    Variation of signs means that anaphylaxis may be confused with other problems. Moreover, if a dog has a thicker coat, the dermatological symptoms may be more difficult to spot. My future research, in collaboration with Murdoch University, seeks to identify potential blood tests that can assist in diagnosing this problem in the emergency department.

    What to do if your dog has an anaphylactic reaction

    Symptoms can occur very rapidly and so it is important to seek veterinary advice immediately. Take your pet straight to the vet if you suspect your dog is experiencing anaphylactic shock. 

    If your dog has been stung by an insect, remove the stinger – you can do this gently with some tweezers. Put the stinger into a container and bring with you to the vet so that they can confirm that it appears to be from a bee. It’s very important that owners don’t self-medicate as this may cause even more stress on the body or delay the trip to the vet. 



    If your dog has a flat face, such as the Bulldog breed, it is important to keep them calm and cool while travelling to the vet (air conditioning or fan), as they are at increased risk of trouble breathing and over-heating when stressed.

    Anaphylaxis in dogs presents differently than other animals and often shows more symptoms. For instance, in cats an anaphylactic reaction may show in the form of trouble breathing, like an asthma attack. Whereas in dogs, it may also affect the liver, the gut and cause abnormal blood flow. In some cases, internal bleeding may occur, and the dog may need a blood transfusion.

    One of the areas of the discussion between vets are the use of epi-pens by owners if an anaphylactic reaction occurs at home. However, there has not been enough research conducted to form a substantial conclusion and provide comprehensive recommendations.

    What treatments are available?


    Anaphylaxis is an emergency and requires immediate medical intervention. Once a dog is presented at a veterinary clinic, they may receive a range of treatments depending on the severity of the reaction and the cause. The goals of these treatments are to assist with breathing and to administer drugs which will stabilise the pet to minimise additional shock.

    An antihistamine injection may be administered and if more acute, the dog may be placed on a drip and given intravenous fluid or adrenaline. The good news is that 58% of dogs go home soon after assessment by a vet and if admitted to hospital, 88% of dogs go home within 12 hours.

    Anaphylaxis usually has a great outcome, with very low mortality rate – under 0.5%. Death is usually due to euthanasia if a dog is experiencing severe complications and requires high level costly treatment. This highlights the importance of pet insurance to cover therapies for conditions that are easily treatable.

    What is the recovery like for anaphylaxis?

    Once dogs have received their initial treatment, they may make a full recovery with the help of treating veterinarians. 

    Depending on the severity of the case, dogs may have ongoing appointments with the dermatologist and receive immunotherapy to reduce the severity of the symptoms. This may be in the form of vaccines, or immunotherapy, and additional medications to help reduce the reaction from how the body responds if exposed to the allergen again.

    Although there are not many options for prevention, pet owners can clear their backyards from insect drawing plants to help minimise the chances of an insect sting.

    Frodo's Story

    I found Frodo, my 4-month-old Gordon Setter puppy, collapsed in my backyard surrounded by flowers with bees on them.

    There were multiple piles of vomit around him. He was pale in the gums and having trouble standing. As his owner, I took him to my workplace, a 24-hour specialist hospital. 

    Frodo being treated for anaphylaxis. Note the puffy eyelids
     and lips. He is getting fluid through a catheter
     in one leg and his blood pressure monitored
    via the cuff on the other leg.
    There he was found to have a slow heart rate and no readable blood pressure on the monitor. 

    An emergency ultrasound was performed, and he had swelling of his gall bladder in his liver, which is a typical finding in anaphylaxis. 
    He was given an injection of antihistamine. He then developed a puffy face, and it was clear that he had been stung by a bee. 

    An intravenous catheter (or cannula) was placed in his leg, and he was given rapid intravenous fluids, also known as a drip, to increase his blood pressure.

    After each dose of fluid was given, his blood pressure slowly came up. After three doses, his blood pressure was adequate, therefore an injection of adrenaline was not needed.

    Frodo made a fast recovery from that point and went home. He returned to the hospital in a month’s time to see the specialist Dermatology service. They tested him for bee and wasp allergy by injecting small amounts of venom under the skin and seeing if his skin reacted. He reacted strongly to both venoms. 

    He then commenced immunotherapy to get his body used to the venom and not have such a dramatic reaction in the future. This involved weekly injections of venom, slowly increasing the amount of venom, and monitoring him closely. He did very well with this treatment. About 6 months after starting immunotherapy, he was found trying to eat a bee on the ground and developed a puffy lip and swollen eyelids. However, he did not develop anaphylaxis!

    He is now 9 years old and has never had another anaphylaxis event, despite being an avid bee chaser. His case prompted my research interest in anaphylaxis, leading to several studies on the syndrome.

    written by Dr. Lisa Smart, SASH Vets Central Coast, May 2022 for Australian Dog Lover (all rights reserved).

    About Dr Lisa Smart

    Dr Lisa Smart completed a Bachelor of Veterinary Science at the University of Queensland in 2003 before undertaking a rotating internship at Queensland Veterinary Specialists and Pet ER. 

    She then went on to complete a 3-year residency program in Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care at the University of California, Davis, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, and achieved board certification with the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care in 2008. 

    This was followed by a move to Perth and almost 13 years spent as Senior Lecturer in Emergency and Critical Care at Murdoch University.

    Dr Smart has also recently completed a PhD in Emergency Medicine. Her current research interests include shock, coagulation, fluid therapy and anaphylaxis. She is also currently a teleconsultant for VetCT, providing phone advice to veterinarians treating critically ill patients.

    In 2022, Dr Smart joined the team at SASH Vets Central Coast. She is one of the only Criticalists in the region and loves working with the team and referring vets to provide additional high-level care for the pets.

    You can follow SASH Vets on Facebook at www.facebook.com/sashvets

    Related Topics:


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