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Cat blogs

Cat Blogs

20 June 2021

Cat Blogs Cat Blogs
  • Relax With A New Zealand Vineyard Tour
    20 June 2021

    This is New Zealand at Christmas time. The sun is shining and, if you are lucky Christmas day temperatures can be around C256 (F79) and you can enjoy your wine in the shade on the deck at home. Our selfie is of a visiting friend who is seen tasting wines on a Haythornthwaite‘s New Zealand […]

    The post Relax With A New Zealand Vineyard Tour appeared first on Dash Kitten.

  • Happy Father’s Day
    20 June 2021

    Whether your kids are human or furry, enjoy your special day!

    Father’s Day can be bittersweet for those of us whose fathers are no longer with us. My dad passed away 17 years ago, but I still get a little sad each year when Father’s Day comes around.

    The photo above is one of my favorite photos of my dad. Can’t you just feel the love? I think it’s safe to say that nobody else in my life ever has or ever will love me as much as he did.

    Image at top Pexels stockphoto

    Father’s Day Sale on 1TDC, today through Monday
    Get 15% off with code PAPA15

    The post Happy Father’s Day is copyrighted by The Conscious Cat. Republishing this content is prohibited under the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA.) Violators will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

  • Our First Father's Day!!
    20 June 2021

     


    ROARY: So, I hear that today is a special holiday!

    LEVI: What holiday would that be? National Giant Sheltie Day?

    ROARY: No "All looks and no brains", today is a day where everyone is supposed to honor their Fathers or the Father figures in their lives. It is a day to be grateful for all that Fathers/Father figures do and for their love and guidance.

    LEVI: but my Father lives in Ohio. His name is Rambo. That's a really cool name isn't it?

    ROARY: that's your BIRTH Father you furry fluff head, and no one cares who your birth father is! Definitely not ME!  You have your other Father that you LIVE with! Who do you think feeds you and picks up your poop and puts up with your bulldozer, manic and foolish actions? Certainly NOT Mom and I. Since I'm older than you, I will go first. Mom ordered me this mustache from Maisonwares that she saw on the Hauspanther blog. Mom knew that I want to look like Dad! 



    I have a black one and a gray one! Now I look just like Dad!

    LEVI: Where's your glasses?

    ROARY: Oh what do you know? Dad doesn't wear glasses all day long. Anyway, it's not your turn.

    Now I must write Dad a Father's Day greeting.

    "Dear Dad, I thank you for coming  to meet me at Petsmart two days before I was adopted, if it wasn't for you I wouldn't be living with you, Mom and Levi. (Wait, the more I think about that, maybe I shouldn't be thanking you, living with Levi isn't the best you know). Also, you have to learn to give ME more attention. I'm older, better behaved and less aggravating, if I do say so myself! Whether you have let me fall through the cracks or not, (upon the arrival of Levi), I still love you Dad, never forget that! Just please get your act together, ok? Love, Roary"

    LEVI: that was a ridiculous greeting, but whatever. Want to see what Mom got Dad for Father's Day? Here, I'll show you anyway!



    LEVI: I don't know what an "asshole" is but I am CERTAIN that it means that I am extremely handsome and well-behaved. I think this is a most wonderful gift for Dad, don't you agree Roary?


    ROARY: I'm trying to be gentle here, oh intellectually challenged one, the fact that Mom got Dad a shirt saying that sometimes you are an "asshole" is NOT a good thing! Mom would NEVER get Dad a shirt that says something like that in reference to ME. I don't take my toys and DROP THEM off the couch or onto the floor, trying to make as much noise as I can. I don't go around BARKING at the remote control and Dad's iPad as if they were my mortal enemies!! (Your fascination with barking at inanimate objects would keep a therapist busy for HOURS!!! ). I don't go ballistic at the drop of a hat. I don't act manic and out-of-control. To me, your actions define the word "asshole" perfectly.

    LEVI: you think what you want, (oh wait! I heard someone in the hallway, it's time to go out of my mind!), and I will think what I want, and I say that being an "asshole" is a GOOD THING!

    ROARY:Observe "oh brilliant one" in this photo. If that doesn't prove my point, I don't know WHAT DOES!!!







    MOM: This photo was added at the last second. I know you are NEVER supposed to take a photo shooting directly into a window but the shot was too good not to! Yes, the exposure is off, but oh well!


    LEVI: Enough about your bad photograph Mom. I am now sharing MY Father's Day greeting for Dad:

    "Dear Dad, thanks for allowing me to jump like a kangaroo all over you, thank you for taking me on 5000 walks a day, (most of which I choose to just stand and let the wind blow my luxurious mane). Thank you for tolerating my incredibly deep and loud barking. Thank you for the seemingly never-ending supply of treats that you give me on a regular basis, (for pretty much doing NOTHING but sitting when I'm told to). Thank you for feeding me nearly all of my meals. Thank you for thinking that I am DEFINITELY YOUR FAVORITE! You have good taste! Sending Love, bites, barks and LOTS OF JUMPING, your FAVORITE, Levi."


    ROARY: Well, I may not agree with a word of what you wrote in your greeting, but I think we can BOTH agree that we have the BEST DAD EVER!!! Thanks for all that you do, and all you put up with! Love from BOTH OF US!!

    Roary and Levi


    MOM: Sorry about another funky photo

     because of the window in the background


    Oh and Happy Father's Day to all of

     you great Dads out here!!!!!! 










  • Father’s Day 6/20 Blog Links
    20 June 2021
    Summer Begins   June Calendar     Blog Hops If you’d like to participate in a Blog Hop today, all you need to do is click on the graphic above you’d like to participate in and it will take you…
  • Happy Father's Day #SundaySelfie
    20 June 2021

    Meows from Mudpie! 

    Wishing a Happy Father's Day to all the pawsome cat dads out there...especially my grandpa!

    We're joining our friends at The Cat On My Head for the Sunday Selfies blog hop!




  • FATHER’S DAY 2021 GROUP SELFIES
    20 June 2021
    Sunday Selfies: Week #358

    Today we celebrate our dad, who we think is the World’s Best Cat Dad. He does everything for us, and we love him bunches. To honor him, we made a special card with his selfie and a selfie of each of us.

     

     

    If you are wondering about our disguises, it’s sort of an inside joke. But if you look closely at our dad, we think you’ll figure out who is the brunt of the joke. But, we want to assure you, we are not mocking our dad.  This is to let him know we love him so much that we want to be just like him!

    Hopping Time

    Now it is your turn. If you’d like to honor your dad by sharing his selfie, that would be terrific. And if you’d like to share an usie with the two of you, that would be even better. Whatever you decide to share is okay with us. We just hope to see you here hopping with us. Even if you don’t want to share a selfie and hop, please stop by and check out the selfies of your friends.

    WISHING OUR DAD AND ALL DADS A

     

    HAPPY FATHER’S DAY!

     

    Purrs and paw-pats, Misty May, Giulietta, Astrid, Lisbeth, Calista Jo, Cooper Murphy, Sawyer & Kizmet

     



    The post FATHER’S DAY 2021 GROUP SELFIES appeared first on The Cat On My Head.

  • Sunday Selfies
    20 June 2021

    Hi everyone! We are joining The Cat on My Head’s Sunday Selfie Blog Hop.

        We forgot Garfield Day yesterday so Joanie wanted to pose with him.

    And my kitties want to wish their Cat Daddy a Happy Father’s Day! And Happy Father’s Day to all you Cat Daddies out there!

     

    And there is some man cat out there in my town that is the father to Ethel’s kittens.  I was going to get her and Carol spayed on Wednesday, but was unable to get them into traps. I can pet them, but not pick them up. That worked out for the best because she had kittens Thursday. She had 3, but one did not make it.    I am praying for the other 2, one is black and one is a dark tabby.

     

     

  • Kitten with Incredible Resilience is Determined to Live Full Life with the Help of a Kind Couple
    20 June 2021


    A kitten with incredible resilience is determined to live everyday to the fullest.

    Nugget the kittenCass @kitten.fosters

    A 3-week-old kitten named Nugget was brought to a vet clinic after being found abandoned in some bushes. At such a tender age and being riddled with cat flu, the kitten was in desperate need of rescue.

    A vet nurse at the clinic reached out to a local social media group and pleaded for help. "I responded immediately saying we would take him, as he deserves a fighting chance," Cass, a volunteer of Foster Kittens Of Melbourne, shared with Love Meow.

    The kitten was safely taken into her care after a 2 1/2-hour ride. "He was dropped off at our house rolling around in this hand-made hat that the transporter had him in. His eyes were crusted shut and swollen red, yet he was so beyond happy despite his poor condition."

    He was found in some bushes when he was 3 weeks oldCass @kitten.fosters

    Cass and her partner set up a cozy, warm nest in a playpen and began syringe-feeding the kitten around the clock. Nugget was so thankful for the help that he took his medication and had his eyes cleaned like a champ.

    They watched him roll around in bliss until he fell asleep with a full belly, knowing that he was safe and loved.

    He is always happy and adores human companionshipCass @kitten.fosters

    "We were amazed at how happy and carefree he was despite his painful eyes, and despite whatever cruelty he had experienced prior to being handed to the vet clinic."

    A few days after arrival, the couple noticed something different about this pint-sized wonder.

    Cass @kitten.fosters

    "He didn't respond to auditory stimulus at all, his joints were quite deformed, his energy levels were incredibly low and his growth was stunted and abnormal," Cass shared with Love Meow.

    As it turns out, the kitten has elbow and hip dysplasia in all four of his legs, and mild Swimmers Syndrome in his hind limbs. He is deaf but can communicate remarkably well in his own way.

    Cass @kitten.fosters

    With the support of the rescue and unconditional love from the couple, Nugget is getting the best care to help him thrive. He is always in good spirits, and doesn't let anything stop him from enjoying the small things in life.

    "He can play, run around, explore, get cuddles, and play with other cats. He has no idea he's deaf and has formed his unique way of communicating with us," Cass told Love Meow.

    He loves to play and doesn't let anything stop himCass @kitten.fosters

    "For weeks we've been in awe of how determined he is to be a normal kitten, how he takes every new challenge in stride and refuses to be different from his foster siblings."

    Watch Nugget and his journey in this cute video:

    Nugget the kitten www.youtube.com

    Nugget adores other feline friends and insists on keeping up with the crew. He does't hesitate to crawl up onto his human dad's shoulders and squeezes himself in the crook of his neck for good measure.

    Cass @kitten.fosters

    The little nugget of joy is full of adorable quirks and has so much to give.

    "His favorite things to do are to play tag with his foster siblings, cuddle with us in bed and chew on his feet which he's done since he arrived into care."

    Cass @kitten.fosters

    At 10 weeks old, Nugget is still very small for his age, but what he lacks in size, he makes up for in charm and personality.

    The sweet kitten has crawled his way into the couple's hearts, and he is there to stay forever.

    Nugget at 9 weeks oldCass @kitten.fosters

    "Everyday we watch Nuggie discover something new and embrace everything with happy tail wags and chirps. He has the cheekiest, most loving and carefree personality," Cass shared with Love Meow.

    Nugget hanging out with his human dadCass @kitten.fosters

    "No matter what the future holds for our boy, we will be there with him all the way, hand in paw. There's nothing we wouldn't do for him. He deserves every chance to live a full long happy life."

    Nugget is 10 weeks old and living life to the fullestCass @kitten.fosters

    Share this story with your friends. Follow Nugget and Cass' fosters on Instagram.

    Related story: Wobbly Kitten with Determined Effort Gets Back on His Paws and Walks Again

  • 6 Hairless Cat Breeds You Should Know About
    20 June 2021

    They’re Striking. Alienesque. Eternally Nude. They’re cats without fur, and they’re more diverse than you might assume. If you’re like most people, your hairless cat breed identification strategy involves a... Read more »

    The post 6 Hairless Cat Breeds You Should Know About appeared first on All About Cats.

  • 55 Amazing Names For Cats With Green Eyes
    20 June 2021

    Cat that have green eyes have an exotic and mysterious look to them, and if you are having trouble thinking of a good name for your green-eyed cat, then try... Read more »

    The post 55 Amazing Names For Cats With Green Eyes appeared first on All About Cats.

Cat Food blogs

Cat Food Blogs

20 June 2021

Cat Food Blogs Cat Food Blogs
  • Change Those Eating Habits
    17 June 2021

    The post Change Those Eating Habits by Steve Dale appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    The party line has always been not to feed cats variety, but Athens, Georgia-based veterinary nutritionist Dr. Donna Raditic suggests rethinking this theory. Even for cats, she says, variety is the spice of life.

    Begin Healthy Cat Diets at the Beginning

    If you happen to get your cat as an inquisitive kitten, encouraging diet variety is not likely going to be a challenge. “If you can be proactive, you’re ahead of the game,” she says. “Kittens are generally curious enough to eat pretty much anything you offer. Hopefully, you offer variety before the window closes on trying new things.”

    Numerous studies demonstrate that humans can have a hard time as adults trying new food types they didn’t enjoy as children. While some dogs have similarly entrenched taste buds, most canines will try anything edible at any point in their lives if it smells good and even sometimes to their detriment, devouring items not so edible. Cats are famous for being finicky eaters; however, what really happens is that over time cats become habituated to whatever they are fed, based on the taste, smell and especially the texture of the food.

    “We really don’t know why this is the case; as predators, maybe it’s because ancestors of the domestic cat had to learn from a young age what dinner might be and what is safe to eat,” Dr. Raditic says. “But we know most domestic outdoor cats don’t only eat one thing like indoor cats do. We also know their feeding habits develop early.”

    In cats, those feeding habits become a near addiction, again based on taste, smell and texture. Cats become loyal to food based on these three parameters. Veterinarians have historically suggested choosing a brand you and your cat like and if the cat is doing well, stick to it. It’s what veterinary behaviorist Dr. Meghan Herron calls the “If it’s not broken, then don’t fix it concept.” If the cat is doing well, why mess with success?

    Enter Dr. Raditic the disrupter. She says, “Think about what cats do in the wild. It makes sense (that unless your cat is currently on a special or prescription diet) to offer your cat two or three diets, each with different textures, tastes and smells.”

    Changing an Adult’s Diet

    While kittens may enjoy food variation, adult cats are likely to be hesitant at first. You may have to experiment to determine what works.

    Try these simple tips:

    + Choose different textures, moist and dry. If you are anti-dry, offer periodic dry treats, so at least they become familiar with that unique texture.

    + Offer not only different brands but food from altogether different companies. And while Dr. Raditic is a fan of the big players such as Purina, Mars and Hill’s, spice it up a bit by mixing in food from some smaller companies, even some raw diets.

    Of course, you try to gradually add the new diet into the old — but some cats can’t be fooled. They can either pick out their existing diet without trying the new one or avoid the food dish altogether. Making matters worse, the cat may require a new diet because he or she is ill.

    And, of course, Dr. Raditic says to talk to your veterinarian before choosing any diet.

    Why Should You Be Changing Cat Food?

    So, what’s the advantage of all this variation? “You’re increasing the GI tolerance, so the gut flora is not only accustomed to one food and one set of nutrients,” Dr. Raditic says.

    To be sure, it’s important to go about changing cat food gradually, but if all along the gut flora is accustomed to some variety, it’s less likely that stomach upset will occur. More importantly, the cat won’t become married to only one product.

    Many cats aren’t fans of some prescription diets under the best of circum- stances. Cats may not even consider any new diet, because they’ve become habituated to whatever they’ve been eating. As a result, these cats can go days without a meal. That’s right — they’d rather go hungry than eat. And when this occurs, cats can suffer from potentially fatal.

    Tricks to Changing Cat Food

    Dr. Herron, co-editor of Decoding Your Cat and a veterinary behaviorist at Gigi’s, an animal nonprofit in Columbus, Ohio, says that inappetence may be a cue for tricks of the trade, such as:

    1. Pour chicken bouillon into the food dish, and then pour it out so that the essence of chicken remains.
    2. Get several special or prescription diet choices and create a buffet, hoping that your cat chooses at least one.
    3. Another idea from both Dr. Herron and Dr. Raditic is to make feeding interactive and even fun, if you can. Lots of cats enjoy food puzzles. “Certainly, there is no downside to activating a cat’s prey drive,” Dr. Raditic says. “Cats are born to hunt and are better off for it if we can replicate this indoors.”
    4. Warming food in a microwave can help release the aroma to make it more appetizing.
    5. If the cat prefers moist food, add water to the dry food and crush it to moisten.
    6. Feed your cat out of eyesight from other pets. Dr. Herron points out that cats like to eat alone, and they don’t want to share their food bowl with other cats (except if they are raising kittens) — and certainly shar-ing with the slobbery family dog isn’t ideal. All this only adds to the stress of switching diets. Dr. Herron’s favorite method is to place an activated microchip on the cat who is adjusting to a new special diet, so only that cat can enter a room via an e-baby gate or e-pet gate. However, other cats may simply climb over the gate or you may not have the spare room available. A favorite DIY project is to construct a door that will open using the microchip on a large dog crate. “A large dog crate is enclosed to offer safety and privacy, but the visibility allows a cat to see what’s going on.”

    Changing cat food is inevitable, and Dr. Raditic believes in being proactive to hopefully prevent a struggle, often at a time when the feline is ill.

    Lure them in!

    Adding something irresistible to the food bowl often works to lure cats to eat. (Of course, check with your veterinarian before you do so). The idea is to add tuna, as just one example — enough tuna so that your cat eats even if the new food is only 10% of what’s there. Then over time, gradually add more food as you simultaneously slowly remove tuna or whatever the special item is.

    Here’s a list of some of Dr. Raditic and Dr. Herron’s favorites to lure cats to their new food:

    Nutritional yeast (easy enough to simply sprinkle on the food).

    Tuna, salmon, sardines (or just the tuna, salmon or sardine juice)

    Parmesan cheese

    Bonito flakes

    Freeze-dried liver

    Manufactured treats (countless choices are available, and cats have a wide array of individual preferences)

    Angel food cake

    Bouillon

    Veterinary appetite stimulants: Mirtazapine or Entyce, for example.

    Steve Dale is a certified animal behavior consultant who’s authored several books, including the e-book Good Cat, and has contributed to many, including ‘The Cat: Clinical Medicine and Management’, edited by Dr. Susan Little. He hosts two national radio shows and is heard on WGN Radio, Chicago, and seen on syndicated HouseSmartsTV. 

    The post Change Those Eating Habits by Steve Dale appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

  • How Much Should I Feed My Cat?
    17 June 2021

    The post How Much Should I Feed My Cat? by catedit appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    If you’re a first-time cat owner, “How much should I feed my cat?” is likely to be one of your first questions when you bring your cat home. Even if you’ve owned cats for years, you may sometimes wonder whether your cats are getting too little food or too much. Let’s go through a few factors to consider when answering “How much should I feed my cat”?

    How much should I feed my cat? The basics If you’ve ever wondered “How much should I feed my cat?” We’ve got the answers. Photography ©g215 | Thinkstock.

    The answer to “How much should I feed my cat” is based on many variables, including a cat’s weight and a cat’s age, whether you’re feeding wet cat food or dry cat food, the cat’s activity level, and whether or not she is pregnant or nursing.

    The brand of food you’re feeding also makes a difference when we’re answering the question “How much should I feed my cat.” A dense, high quality dry cat food will contain more nutrients by weight than a low-quality food, and thus require smaller portions to deliver the same amount of nutrition for your cat.

    Many cat owners allow their cats free access to dry food, supplemented by canned food once or twice a day. A dry-food-only diet is not necessarily a bad pet diet if you’re feeding high quality food, but it does require that you encourage your cat to drink a lot more water to compensate for what she’s not getting in canned food.

    When to feed your cat

    When you bring a new cat home, it’s important to continue to feed her the same amount of the same food on the same schedule that’s she’s been accustomed to, then gradually migrate to your own food and schedule. Cats are very sensitive to change, and a new cat will be dealing with a lot of new-environment stress, so keeping the food and schedule consistent will ease her transition and keep intestinal upset at bay.

    When you’re ready to transition your cat over to your own food and schedule, you’ll need to determine what kind of food you’ll be feeding her (wet or dry, raw food or a combo), and using the calorie counts in each food, determine how much of which kind to feed her.

    What to feed your cat — wet food or dry food? How much to feed a cat also depends on if you feed your cat wet or dry food. Photography by africa studio/shutterstock.

    Another important factor in answering “How much should I feed my cat?” is considering what you’re feeing your cat. The foundation of a healthy cat diet is flesh-based protein like meat, fish or poultry. Dry food should be high in animal proteins, and low in plant proteins (which cats are ill-equipped to digest). Carbohydrates should make up no more than ten percent of the mix of cat food ingredients.

    Wet foods should consist predominantly of meat with as few by-products and fillers as possible.

    Still wondering, “How much should I feed my cat?” Some calculations

    According to the Animal Medical Center in New York, a healthy, active 8-pound adult cat requires about 30 calories per pound per day. So, the average 8-pound cat requires about 240 calories per day.

    Typically, dry food contains about 300 calories per cup, and canned food contains about 250 calories in each 6 oz can. (or, 125 per 3-ounce can). Using these counts as a guide, an 8-pound cat would need 4/5 of a cup of dry food or just less than a full 6-oz can (or two 3-ounce cans) of wet food per day. You can adjust the proportions based on whether your cat prefers more or less dry or wet food.

    If you’re free feeding your cat dry food, each day measure out the day’s allotment of food into your dry food feeder. This decreases the amount of food that gets stale and needs to be discarded. It will also help you monitor how much your cats are eating. If you have to take a thin cat to the vet, it will help in the diagnosis if you can identify exactly how much she eats per day.

    Portioning out the food will keep your cats from overeating. Free choice feeding is one of the top contributors to feline obesity.

    How often to feed a cat Your cat’s feeding schedule is another thing to consider. Photography by Remains/Thinkstock.

    Another factor in determining “How much should I feed my cat” depends on how often you feed your cat. And how often to feed a cat depends on what you’re feeding her. Most cat owners feed their cats in the morning and at night, and may or may not supplement those feedings with free feeding of dry food throughout the day.

    Is your cat eating enough — or too little?

    Throughout your cat’s life you will need to modify her diet to accommodate changing metabolism and dietary needs. Feel your cat’s backbone and ribs. If the ribs and backbone show through her skin, she is too thin. If you can’t feel the ribs, your cat is likely overweight. Adjust her portions accordingly.

    Keeping your cat from becoming obese is much easier than forcing an obese cat to diet. And it will make both you and your cat a lot happier.

    Thumbnail: Photography ©bluebeat76 | Thinkstock.

    This piece was first published in 2009. 

    Read more about cats and food on Catster:

    The post How Much Should I Feed My Cat? by catedit appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

  • Should Your Cat Hunt For Food?
    17 June 2021

    The post Should Your Cat Hunt For Food? by Sassafras Lowrey appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    Cats are natural hunters and in need of daily exercise. A simple way to increase the amount of activity in your cat’s day is to stop feeding your cat in a bowl and allow your cat to “hunt” for their meals. 

    Instead of just putting your cat’s meals into a bowl or on a dish, you can channel your cat’s natural hunting instinct by purchasing or creating feeding puzzles. This turns mealtime into an interactive game adding enrichment to your cat’s day. 

    How to feed a cat with puzzle feeders 

    Dr. Jamie Richardson, DVM with Small Door Veterinary, recommends providing puzzle toys and interactive toys for your cat to play with on their own. 

    Dr. Richardson specifically recommends the:  Nina Ottosson puzzle toys and Doc & Phoebe’s Indoor Hunting Feeder.” Another option is the KONG Cat Treat Dispensing Ball. Although designed for treats depending on the side/shape of your cat’s kibble, you can also use this for dispensing dry cat food as part of mealtime. These toys allow your cat to “work” for their food by figuring out how to interact with the puzzles/treat dispensers to release the food. 

    How to have your cat hunt for food using DIY puzzles

    You can easily create puzzles for your cat to hunt treats in by repurposing boxes that get delivered. Take empty boxes and either leave them open or cut holes into them that your cat can “fish” with her paws into. Then put all or a portion of your cat’s kibble for a meal into the boxes. By spreading the meal through multiple boxes of different sizes and different-shaped holes, your cat will have an interactive meal that provides mental exercise and stimulation. 

    You can feed your cat wet food and still make mealtime interactive 

    If your cat eats wet food for some or all of his meals, it’s still possible to add enrichment to your feeding routine. The Doc & Phoebe Wet Feeder is designed to increase enrichment while your cat eats and slow your cat down to prevent him from scarfing his meal. You can also create slow feeders for wet food by utilizing food-safe use of silicone plates, cupcakes and cake molds. Purchase them in various shapes in the baking or cooking section of most stores. By spreading wet food around, the silicone’s shapes and texture give your cat something interesting to lick, and she will have to work to get all the food out of the different cervices. Most of these molds are dishwasher safe making them easy to clean and sterilize after feeding.  

    Turns mealtime into an interactive game. Photo: Nils Jacobi/Getty ImageUse search opportunities to feed your cat

    In addition to using or making puzzles for feeding your cat, you can create more of a hunting experience for your cats by using the cat furniture you already have in your house. Take your cat’s pre-measured kibble and scatter it into cat tunnels, cat trees, or other climbing areas. This is a great way to increase your cat’s overall physical activity level as he will have to go in search of his meal instead of just eating from a dish. 

    How to add challenges

    Adding enrichment to feeding time is fun for most cats. The more practice your cat gets, the better she will get at “hunting” for her food. Over time you can begin to expand the search/puzzles you provide to make them more complicated. You can also combine multiple boxes into puzzle structures to make the hunt more complicated. 

    Supervision 

    Be sure to monitor your cat as they are “hunting” for their meal to ensure that your cat finds all of its food and gets enough to eat.

    If you have multiple cats, it’s generally best to keep your cats separated during mealtime. This is especially true if you are hiding food for your cat to search for. This will ensure that each cat is getting its appropriate serving of food for each meal. It will also prevent conflict or bullying between the cats as they hunt for their meals. 

    Featured Image: Chalabala/Getty Images

    Read Next: 4 Things to Consider Before Making Homemade Cat Food

    The post Should Your Cat Hunt For Food? by Sassafras Lowrey appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

  • Can Cats Eat Bacon? Get the Facts
    17 June 2021

    The post Can Cats Eat Bacon? Get the Facts by Elizabeth Vecsi appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    Cats are obligate carnivores, which means they must eat meat; their bodies simply require it. (On the other hand, dogs are considered scavenging carnivores, which means they are primarily meat eaters — but they could survive on plants alone if absolutely necessary.) But what about meats like bacon? Can cats eat bacon? And if cats can eat bacon, should they? 

    What exactly is bacon and can cats eat bacon? Photography by Bottaci / Shutterstock.The Basics About Bacon

    Before we answer the question, “Can cats eat bacon?” let’s look at what bacon is exactly. Bacon belongs to the pork family, which is one of the more versatile meats that we include in family meal planning. But pork and its counterparts — like bacon and ham — are loaded with sodium, fat and calories that our cats should receive in very small doses.

    Should Cats Eat Bacon?

    So, can cats eat bacon? Technically yes. Having too much bacon might make them immediately ill (more on that later), but the bigger problem is that bacon can have some negative long-term effects on our felines. Many cats — especially as they age and are kept strictly indoors — do a lot more sleeping than hunting or playing. They really need a careful nutrition profile to counteract their lack of movement.

    With a sleeping schedule of 16 to 20 hours per day (yes, you read that correctly), it doesn’t leave much time for the cat’s body to burn off the dense calorie profile of bacon or any other pork products. Bacon especially contains a lot of sodium and fat, which is no better for pets than it is for us.

    Simply put, eating too much salt can lead to the following conditions for your cat:

    1. High blood pressure
    2. Obesity
    3. Dehydration
    4. Clogged blood vessels
    Can Cats Eat Turkey Bacon?

    Cats eating turkey bacon isn’t a better alternative to your usual bacon, either. Turkey bacon should also be fed to cats in very small doses due to the high amount of sodium and preservatives required in making the product.

    Can Cats Eat Bacon Bits?

    You might also be wondering, “Can cats eat bacon bits, then?” Again, you should avoid the artificial bacon bits that you may sprinkle on salads for the exact same reasons why over-processed, sodium-rich products are not a great idea for your cat’s wellbeing.

    Can Cats Eat Bacon Raw?

    While it’s generally important for any type of pork product to be cooked thoroughly to avoid parasites, you can feed your cat an occasional piece of raw bacon. However, the lack of actual health benefits is still present so you are strongly advised to consult with a veterinarian or veterinary nutritionist before feeding your cat any type of raw meat.

    Cats Can Eat Bacon as Treats?

    So, when should you feed a cat bacon? Bacon and bits of ham are particularly good to hide pills on a short-time basis, or as a high-level reward (think after a nail-trimming session or a trip to the vet). Remember: If it’s an occasional treat, it will likely be appreciated that much more by your cat.

    “We love our pets and want to give them treats, but we often don’t think about treats from a caloric standpoint,” says John P. Loftus, PhD, DVM, at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine. “It adds up over time. Better to show our love in ways other than food.”

    What Happens If Your Cat Eats a Lot of Bacon?

    If your cat unexpectedly ingests a hefty portion of the bacon you were going to serve to guests at a Sunday brunch, you may find that he gets an upset stomach and eventually vomits (so watch where you step). But the likelihood is that he’ll be just fine, and hopefully you have extra bacon to cook for your guests!

    Thumbnail: Photography © anmbph | iStock / Getty Images. 

    Read more about what cats can — and can’t — eat on Catster.com:

    Can cats eat …

    The post Can Cats Eat Bacon? Get the Facts by Elizabeth Vecsi appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

  • Why Is My Cat Always Hungry? 5 Reasons
    17 June 2021

    The post Why Is My Cat Always Hungry? 5 Reasons by JaneA Kelley appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    Have you ever thought, “Why is my cat always hungry?” You’re not alone. As a cat guardian, you know that a cat who won’t eat for a day or so means a trip to the vet. But did you know that a cat who is always hungry can be a sign of health problems, both physical and psychological? Here are some answers to the question, “Why is my cat always hungry?”

    A cat who is always hungry might have roundworms. Photography by Katerina Maksymenko | Shutterstock.1. Your cat has worms

    Is your cat always hungry? Roundworms can mean a cat who is always hungry, because the worms are taking all the nutrition from his food before he can get it. Ironically, a roundworm-infested cat may look fat, as the parasites cause his body to swell.

    Roundworms are contagious to humans, so if you suspect your cat has them, bring a fecal sample to your vet to have it tested.

    2. Your cat has hyperthyroidism or diabetes

    These diseases both cause a vast increase in appetite: hyperthyroidism does so because your cat’s metabolism is burning too many calories, and diabetes because your cat’s body can’t convert sugar to energy — and the nutrition doesn’t even get into his body in the first place. If your cat is always hungry, eating constantly and still losing weight, and especially if he’s also drinking a lot of water, get him to the vet as soon as possible.

    A cat who won’t stop eating might just be bored or hungry. Photography ©Svetlanais | Thinkstock.3. Your cat is bored or lonely

    A simple answer to, “Why is my cat always hungry?” Just like humans, some cats will eat because they’re bored. The solution to this problem is to provide your cat with more stimulation and to stop leaving kibble out for him to munch on, or free feeding him, all day. If you want to have a supply of food available, provide it in puzzle toys, which will make your cat work for his meal. This will help him burn calories and keep his mind engaged.

    Be sure to provide other intellectually-stimulating toys (or maybe even a kitty friend) to keep his mind off his dish. You can also buy automatic feeders, which provide access to a set amount of food at set times of day.

    4. Your cat is depressed

    Is your cat always hungry? As in humans, overeating can be a self-soothing behavior for cats who are depressed or grieving. I’ve seen this happen: I once met a couple who had a cat they’d exiled to the basement after their baby was born. In response, the cat started eating to self-soothe, and the result was incredibly sad.

    If your cat is depressed, try drawing him out of his shell with gentle interactive play. Give him “love blinks” — close your eyes slowly, leave them closed for a second, and then open them slowly, while thinking “I love you.”

    5. Your cat’s food isn’t meeting his nutritional needs

    You know how when you eat fast food, you’re usually hungry an hour later no matter how much you ate? Unsurprisingly, another answer to, “Why is my cat always hungry?” is that poor-quality cat food can have the same effect on your cat. And like a person who eats a lot of fast food or who can only afford starchy foods, your cat will eat and eat because he can’t satisfy the true hunger (for nutrients) at the root of his desire to eat.

    Another thing to remember when wondering, “Why is my cat always hungry?”

    Cats’ stomachs are extremely small: a couple of tablespoons of canned or raw food or (not and) a third of a cup of kibble per feeding is about all a cat needs to stay fit and healthy. Of course, if your cat is a 20-pound Maine Coon, he’ll need a lot more food than a petite Singapura, so be sure to work with your vet to figure out the most appropriate amount to feed your feline friend.

    Tell us: Is your cat always hungry? How did you solve the issue?

    This piece was originally published in 2015.

    Thumbnail: Photography ©Ukususha | Thinkstock.

    Are YOU always hungry, even after you eat? Here are a few reasons why >>

    Read more about feeding cats on Catster.com:

    The post Why Is My Cat Always Hungry? 5 Reasons by JaneA Kelley appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

  • How to Feed Your Cat If You’re Food Insecure
    17 June 2021

    The post How to Feed Your Cat If You’re Food Insecure by Beth Ann Mayer appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    Unemployment has skyrocketed during COVID-19, and it’s left people struggling to put food on their tables. When cat parents can’t afford to feed themselves, they’re likely struggling to make ends meet for their pets as well.

    If you’re hurting, know you’re not alone. The ASPCA recently released new data showing that more than 4.2 million pets in the U.S. are likely to enter poverty in the next six months because of COVID-19.

    “With the potential for a sustained national unemployment rate of 10%, the total number of animals living in poverty with their owners could rise to more than 24.4 million dogs, cats, horses and other animals — a 21 percent increase in the number of animals living in poverty compared to pre-COVID estimates [in February 2020],” says Jessica Sweeney, the senior program manager of ASPCA community engagement. “The number of families who may be struggling to care for their pets is staggering.”

    Sweeney offers advice on finding resources if you need assistance feeding your cat, and no one should be ashamed to ask for help.

    Look for a food pantry

    Local shelters are running food banks and pantries. Pet owners can google “pet food pantry near me” to find one. Local shelters and veterinarians can also help point you in the right direction.

    Photo: ©w-ings | Getty Images.Keep an eye out in aisles

    Pet stores like PetsMart and Petco often have samples available in the aisles. You can try stocking up on those to tide you over. They also may have coupons you can use. If you can’t find any, try calling your favorite kitty food vendor and explaining your situation. They may be willing to send you some coupons or free samples.

    Don’t be shy

    Asking for help can be emotional. You may feel inadequate because you cannot afford cat food or embarrassed to ask for help, but you shouldn’t. Organizations are here to help.

    “The COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented challenges for pet owners by straining essential owner resources and making it difficult for people to access the supplies and services they need to care for their pets,” Sweeney says. “We believe that pets and people belong together; that financial circumstances alone are not reliable indicators of the capacity to love and care for a companion animal.”

    Featured photo: Chalabala | Getty Images

    Read Next: Coronavirus and Cats: What Cat Owners Need to Know About COVID-19

    The post How to Feed Your Cat If You’re Food Insecure by Beth Ann Mayer appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

  • How to Switch Your Cat’s Food From Dry to Wet or Vice Versa
    17 June 2021

    The post How to Switch Your Cat’s Food From Dry to Wet or Vice Versa by catedit appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    Cats, at least stereotypically, like to live life on their own terms. Unlike dogs who live to please, Kitty is more likely to tell you you’re doing such a lousy job petting her or that your new shaggy rug is nowhere near as great as the plush one you used to have.

    Some of that is internet meme lore, but when it comes to food, cats tend to be far pickier about what they eat, and that can make it difficult to switch things up.

    “Cats are just more particular about palatability, texture and flavor,” says Dr. Angie Kraus from I and love and you.

    But Dr. Kraus says wet food is better for cats than dry food.

    “Cats are carnivores,” she says. “When we feed them kibble, we are feeding them a lot of carbohydrates. In order to make a kibble, you have to make it crunchy, which requires some kind of carbohydrate like … rice.”

    A diet high in carbs can lead to obesity, dental and gastrointestinal issues and pancreatitis. Even if Kitty loves her kibble, Dr. Kraus believes it’s worth it to transition a cat from dry to wet food. She shares tips for getting even the most particular kitty on board with the change.

    Photo: AaronAmat / Getty ImagesGo slow

    Dr. Kraus advises against trying to go cold turkey by putting out dry food one day and only wet food the next. “Cats will definitely win out in a starvation game,” she says. “If you don’t feed a cat for 72 hours, they can have pretty serious issues like liver disease that aren’t reversible and quite possibly life-threatening.” Instead, try putting a little wet food out to see if the cat is interested. “If they are not, I will mix it into what they are already liking so they can slowly get [used to it].” Every couple of days, decrease the amount of dry food and increase the amount of wet food. Patience is a virtue. Dr. Kraus says that some cats may be able to transition from dry to wet food in one week. “For the cats who aren’t as easy-going, it can take a few months,” she warns.

    Get creative

    If Kitty isn’t taking to her new diet, you may need to try a few things out. Remember, cats have their idiocracies. “There are some cats that have a lot of specific temperature preferences,” Dr. Kraus says. “People trying to get their cat from kibble to wet foods may find they like their food slightly warm or with a little water.” Sometimes, presentation can be everything. “They don’t like the bowl. They don’t want their whiskers to touch the bowl, or they want a plate, but they don’t want that plate to be plastic,” Dr. Kraus says even the location of the bowl or plate and the time you’re putting it out can affect whether Kitty takes the food or leaves it. Play around with it.

    Related: Make Mealtime Fun for Cats

    Sometimes, combo-feeding is a good compromise. “If there can be any wet, that’s better, and a lot of people have to combo feed because their cats refuse to eat only wet food, and some cats will only eat dry food once they have become accustomed to dry food,” Dr. Kraus says.

    Photo: Sergey Pakulin/Getty ImagesWhat about changing from wet cat food to dry food?

    Though Dr. Kraus says wet is best, sometimes people want to do the opposite and transition to dry food.

    “The most practical consideration is being able to leave [the cat over the weekend] without a pet sitter, or economical reasons,” Dr. Kraus says. “Dry food can be a lot cheaper than wet food.”

    This transition should also be slow. Start by putting out a little kibble to see if the cat will take it. If not, mix it with wet food. Not working? “There are a lot of fun food toys and dispensers that make it interesting,” Dr. Kraus says. “They can roll a ball around, and it can dispense food or it will look like grass, and they have to bat it around to get it out of the grass.”

    Top photograph: Chalabala / Getty Images

    Read Next: We’re Feeding Cats Wrong — Ditch the Cat Food Bowls and Change the Schedules

     

    The post How to Switch Your Cat’s Food From Dry to Wet or Vice Versa by catedit appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

  • How to Feed Cats: Are We Doing It Wrong?
    17 June 2021

    The post How to Feed Cats: Are We Doing It Wrong? by Steve Dale appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    We’re feeding our cats all wrong. And they’re paying a price for it. To be clear, I am not diving into what we feed our cats; this is about how to feed cats.

    Most cat parents free feed their cats, which isn’t ideal. Photography ©HASLOO | Thinkstock.How we feed cats now — and what’s so wrong about it

    Most cat caretakers feed their cats from bowls. And most of those free feed, leaving food out 24/7. The idea is that cats don’t naturally scarf down meals all at once — and that is true. They catch what they can when they can.

    However, given the open buffet, most cats eat unnaturally large meals all at once and then return for even more. Perhaps, exasperating the issue is that most cats have little else to do but eat.

    According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, the majority of people who have a cat actually have, on average, just over two cats. With two cats or more in a house, it’s difficult to gauge which cat is eating more. Though you may figure it out when eventually the veterinarian says, “My, lovely Susie here has gained 2 pounds since her last visit.”

    And cats, being cats, are excellent trainers of humans; they train us to keep filling the food dish.

    Feeding exclusively moist food doesn’t solve the problem. Caretakers put down the food at prescribed times, the cats eat it and it’s over. To survive outside, cats catch somewhere around eight to 13 small prey in a day. The edible contents of the average mouse or bird is about one to two tablespoons, not a heaping one-half cup at a time.

    You see, cats are born with a prey drive and are hardwired to seek, hunt and pounce. In our homes, we don’t give them the opportunity. Absolutely, having toys to chase or pounce is necessary. Still, it’s not the same as hunting for a meal.

    Researchers have studied how community cats and barn cats naturally spend time. According to “Behaviour and ecology of free-ranging female farm cats,” International Journal Behavioural Biology Ethology, Panaman, R. 1981, outdoor cats rest or sleep a lot — after all, they are cats, at 62 percent of the day. Much of that resting time occurs after the series of seeking, hunting and feeding, which accounts for 19 percent. (The remaining time is spent grooming or playing.) Various other studies confirm similar data.

    Domestic cats, like their big cat cousins, are used to hunting for their food. Photography ©Blickwinkel | Alamy Stock Photo.Cats are used to hunting for their food

    Inside our homes, seeking the food is predictable and doesn’t account for time or effort; hunting is not necessary, though certainly there’s feeding — a lot of feeding. In part, it explains why 59 percent of cats are overweight or obese (Association for Pet Obesity Prevention).

    I suggest that by offering food on a silver platter or bowl, we’re not allowing cats to be cats. There’s mounting evidence that demonstrates many animals would rather work for food — contra- freeloading — than have it offered freely. So far, studies have been limited to some zoo animals and lab rodents, but if the grizzly bears, meerkats and rats studied prefer to labor to get their meals, why not cats and dogs?

    What’s more, not being able to search out and capture a meal appears to be stressful to cats. Dr. Tony Buffington (then at the Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine and now a clinical professor volunteer at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and honorary research fellow at University of Bristol, School of Veterinary Sciences) discovered a dull, unenriched life is anxiety inducing in cats.

    Feeding our cats appropriately is only one means to enrich lives, but just because a cat is scarfing down food doesn’t mean there isn’t mounting anxiety. In some cats, this chronic stress leads to what has been coined idiopathic feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD). Now Buffington calls this greatly stress-induced illness Pandora’s Syndrome. Over the years, lots of medications have been tried and all without much success. However, Buffington discovered that providing structure and an enriched environment can solve the problem — or prevent it in the first place.

    When ordering the Indoor Cat Feeder, use the discount code CATSWINN to support the nonprofit Winn Feline Foundation. Photography by Casey Elise Photography.How to feed cats: activate their prey drive

    Some veterinary behaviorists and cat behavior consultants have been talking about creating ways for cats to activate their prey drive indoors. Dr. Elizabeth Bales put all the science together and created the Indoor Cat Feeder.

    The feeding system includes objects resembling mice, which kibble is deposited into. The dispensers consist of a soft outer skin to simulate prey and a BPA-free plastic inner container, which holds one-fifth of the cat’s daily ration. There are two holes on the back of each food dispenser. The idea is to split a meal between the five dispensers and ultimately to hide them. Cats learn to hunt indoors by finding each food-filled dispenser, pouncing on it and manipulating each device to dispense the small meal. Use with kibble. The Indoor Cat Feeder isn’t the only choice; there are lots of food puzzles available at most pet stores and online.

    Puzzle feeders can make mealtime more exciting for your cat. Photography by Tierfotoagentur | Alamy Stock Photo.How to feed cats properly — what cat parents can do:

    There are ways to encourage indoor cats to be cats:

    1. Activate the prey drive, which all cats have, by playing with an interactive cat toy. Be sure to let the cat “catch” the feather, fabric or whatever is at the end of fishing pole-type toys. That can be a problem with the laser light. Yes, great exercise to chase the little red bug, but all those nerve endings which go from paws directly to the brain realize, “I’ve caught nothing, really.” Since that may be a frustrating feeling — to never catch — I suggest dropping a piece of kibble or a treat on that little dot periodically. (Also be sure if children are playing with the laser light that there is adult supervision, so the children never shine the light in the cat’s eyes or their own eyes).
    2. Want your cat to stop waking you up overnight? Stop offering him attention when he dances on your tummy at 4 a.m. But also feed a snack before bedtime. Just like you may loosen your belt and take a nap following a snack, the same is true for cats. (Note: If the cat waking you up overnight is a new behavior, consult your veterinarian to rule out a medical cause).
    3. If you feed kibble only, offer an occasional snack of moist food. The same is true if you are a believer in moist food — occasionally offer either kibble or hard treats. Cats become accustomed to specific textures, and often later in life may require a special veterinary diet, which may be a different type of texture than whatever you’ve been feeding for a lifetime. Convincing some cats to change their ways is challenging; they just don’t want to try the novel-feeling product. However, it is possible that with prior positive experience to a different texture at least some cats may be more willing to give it a shot.

    Hopefully, I’ve given you some food for thought when it comes to how to feed cats.

    Tell us: How do you feed your cats? What do you think about this advice on how to feed cats?

    This piece was originally published on January 31, 2018.

    Read more about cat food and feeding cats on Catster.com:

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  • Is Vegan Cat Food Okay?
    17 June 2021

    The post Is Vegan Cat Food Okay? by Ellyce Rothrock appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    Given the fact that cats are obligate carnivores, creatures that feed primarily or exclusively on animal matter for their health and well-being, is becoming a vegetarian a good idea? Is vegan cat food okay?

    Is vegan cat food okay? A vet weighs in. Is vegan cat food okay? Photography ©serg78 | Getty Images.

    “For cats, it’s really inappropriate,” says Cailin Heinze, VMD, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist and assistant professor of nutrition at Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.

    The risks of vegan cat food

    The risks of feeding cats a vegetarian or vegan diet include inadequate total protein intake, imbalance of amino acids such as taurine or essential fatty acids like arachidonic acid, and deficiency in vitamins and minerals that are obtained ideally, or only, through meat or other animal products.

    Health risks associated with vegan cat food and vegetarian cat food

    These dietary problems can lead to serious and sometimes irreversible medical conditions, according to Jennifer Larsen, DVM, PhD, board-certified veterinary nutritionist and professor of clinical nutrition at the University of California, Davis veterinary school. The one issue veterinarians mention most often is taurine-related dilated cardiomyopathy (enlarged heart with weak contractions and poor pumping ability), but low taurine can also lead to reproductive failures, growth failures and eye problems, she adds.

    “We did see a case of a cat that almost died as a result of taurine deficiency,” Dr. Larsen says. “The owners were feeding a vegan cat kibble, so a commercially available vegan diet, and they were mixing that diet with cooked chicken breast, for some reason, but it was not enough taurine for the cat, obviously, and it resulted in a near-death experience for this animal.”

    Thumbnail: Photography ©Gabriele Grassl | Getty Images. 

    About the author

    Ellyce Rothrock spent half her life with Flea, a Maine Coon who lived to be 21 and is missed every single day. She’s currently seeking a feline friend to manage Fritz and Mina, her German Shepherd rescues. She’s lucky enough to live her passion for pets as a 25-year member of the pet media industry.

    Editor’s note: This article originally appeared in Catster magazine. Have you seen the new Catster print magazine in stores? Or in the waiting area of your vet’s office? Click here to subscribe to Catster and get the bimonthly magazine delivered to your home. 

    Read more about cat food on Catster.com:

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  • Cats Are Obligate Carnivores — What That Means & Why It Matters
    17 June 2021

    The post Cats Are Obligate Carnivores — What That Means & Why It Matters by Ellyce Rothrock appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

    Next time you catch your cat napping in a sliver of afternoon sunlight, think tiger. Think lion. You wouldn’t think a lion or tiger would eat a plant-based diet, right? Of course not! Big cats are obligate carnivores, which means eating meat is absolutely biologically essential to their survival.

    Your little tiger isn’t much different. Domestic cats are true obligate carnivores who must eat meat in order for her body to receive certain vital compounds for her long-term health and well-being.

    Cats need more protein than humans or dogs, according to Deborah E. Linder, DVM, MS, board-certified veterinary nutritionist, head of the Obesity Clinic for Animals at Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. Kittens need more protein than most other animals, and adult cats need two to three times more protein than dogs, she adds.

    Vegetarian or vegan diets fail to provide the amino acids necessary for proper feline health and are too high in carbohydrates that cats have not evolved to be able to process, according to Marla McGeorge, JD, DVM, a feline specialist consultant in Portland, Oregon.

    (Is being vegan healthy for YOU? Come find out >>)

    Obligate carnivores — what exactly does that mean? Cats are obligate carnivores but what does that really mean? Photography ©Voren1 | Getty Images.

    Before we go any further, let’s clear about what exactly obligate carnivores are:

    • Obligate (adjective): ob•li•gate • biologically essential for survival • restricted to one particularly characteristic mode of life
    • Carnivore (noun): car•ni•vore • an animal that feeds primarily or exclusively on animal matter
    Must-have nutrients for cats

    One vital amino acid that cats can’t get from any source other than animal protein is taurine. Cats can’t make taurine from other amino acids as most mammals can, said Joe Bartges, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVN, Professor of Internal Medicine and Nutrition at the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine.

    When cats are fed a diet too low in taurine, they can suffer retinal degeneration, dilated cardiomyopathy and reproductive issues, according to Dr. Linder. While all cat foods should include taurine, she says, the total amount in the diet is not the only important factor. Other ingredients in the diet can affect how taurine is broken down in the gut and how bioavailable it is to the cat, so it’s important to feed a diet that has been carefully formulated and tested, she adds.

    Cats also lack the enzyme needed to make their own arginine, another amino acid found in animal protein, so it must be provided in higher amounts in their diet, according to Dr. Linder. Arginine is involved in removing ammonia from the body; if this function is impaired, cats can suffer weight loss, vomiting, neurological issues and even death.

    A meat-rich diet also provides vitamin A, a nutrient that cats are unable to convert from beta-carotene, as well as other certain key nutrients, including arachidonic acid and vitamin B12, which can’t be sufficiently obtained from plant-based foods, says Dr. Bartges. Without a steady supply of these nutrients, cats can suffer from liver and heart problems, not to mention skin irritation and hearing loss, he says.
    Feline diets also need added niacin and vitamin D3, according to Dr. Linder.

    What protein is best for cats? What protein is best for cats? Photography ©GlobalP | Getty Images.

    As to which animal protein is best for these obligate carnivores — beef, chicken or fish — there is no one best type, according to Tony Buffington, DVM, PhD, DACVN, emeritus professor of veterinary clinical sciences at Ohio State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

    In fact, it doesn’t really matter if a cat gets her protein from dry or wet food, as long as she eats the food and it satisfies her nutritional needs, says Dr. Buffington. The key is to review the label. Commercial cat food labels should say that the product is formulated to meet Association of American Feed Control Officials nutrient profiles and complies with its guidelines, meaning it’s nutritionally complete, balanced and appropriate for your cat’s age. Of course, if your cat has specific nutritional needs, always follow your veterinarian’s recommendations, he adds.

    Thumbnail: Photography ©Nataliia Pyzhova | Getty Images.

    About the author

    Ellyce Rothrock spent half her life with Flea, a Maine Coon who lived to be 21 and is missed every single day. She’s currently seeking a feline friend to manage Fritz and Mina, her German Shepherd rescues. She’s lucky enough to live her passion for pets as a 25-year member of the pet media industry.

    Read more about cat food on Catster.com:

    The post Cats Are Obligate Carnivores — What That Means & Why It Matters by Ellyce Rothrock appeared first on Catster. Copying over entire articles infringes on copyright laws. You may not be aware of it, but all of these articles were assigned, contracted and paid for, so they aren't considered public domain. However, we appreciate that you like the article and would love it if you continued sharing just the first paragraph of an article, then linking out to the rest of the piece on Catster.com.

Cat Rescue blogs

Cat Rescue Blogs

20 June 2021

Cat Rescue Blogs Cat Rescue Blogs
  • Kitten with Incredible Resilience is Determined to Live Full Life with the Help of a Kind Couple
    20 June 2021


    A kitten with incredible resilience is determined to live everyday to the fullest.

    Nugget the kittenCass @kitten.fosters

    A 3-week-old kitten named Nugget was brought to a vet clinic after being found abandoned in some bushes. At such a tender age and being riddled with cat flu, the kitten was in desperate need of rescue.

    A vet nurse at the clinic reached out to a local social media group and pleaded for help. "I responded immediately saying we would take him, as he deserves a fighting chance," Cass, a volunteer of Foster Kittens Of Melbourne, shared with Love Meow.

    The kitten was safely taken into her care after a 2 1/2-hour ride. "He was dropped off at our house rolling around in this hand-made hat that the transporter had him in. His eyes were crusted shut and swollen red, yet he was so beyond happy despite his poor condition."

    He was found in some bushes when he was 3 weeks oldCass @kitten.fosters

    Cass and her partner set up a cozy, warm nest in a playpen and began syringe-feeding the kitten around the clock. Nugget was so thankful for the help that he took his medication and had his eyes cleaned like a champ.

    They watched him roll around in bliss until he fell asleep with a full belly, knowing that he was safe and loved.

    He is always happy and adores human companionshipCass @kitten.fosters

    "We were amazed at how happy and carefree he was despite his painful eyes, and despite whatever cruelty he had experienced prior to being handed to the vet clinic."

    A few days after arrival, the couple noticed something different about this pint-sized wonder.

    Cass @kitten.fosters

    "He didn't respond to auditory stimulus at all, his joints were quite deformed, his energy levels were incredibly low and his growth was stunted and abnormal," Cass shared with Love Meow.

    As it turns out, the kitten has elbow and hip dysplasia in all four of his legs, and mild Swimmers Syndrome in his hind limbs. He is deaf but can communicate remarkably well in his own way.

    Cass @kitten.fosters

    With the support of the rescue and unconditional love from the couple, Nugget is getting the best care to help him thrive. He is always in good spirits, and doesn't let anything stop him from enjoying the small things in life.

    "He can play, run around, explore, get cuddles, and play with other cats. He has no idea he's deaf and has formed his unique way of communicating with us," Cass told Love Meow.

    He loves to play and doesn't let anything stop himCass @kitten.fosters

    "For weeks we've been in awe of how determined he is to be a normal kitten, how he takes every new challenge in stride and refuses to be different from his foster siblings."

    Watch Nugget and his journey in this cute video:

    Nugget the kitten www.youtube.com

    Nugget adores other feline friends and insists on keeping up with the crew. He does't hesitate to crawl up onto his human dad's shoulders and squeezes himself in the crook of his neck for good measure.

    Cass @kitten.fosters

    The little nugget of joy is full of adorable quirks and has so much to give.

    "His favorite things to do are to play tag with his foster siblings, cuddle with us in bed and chew on his feet which he's done since he arrived into care."

    Cass @kitten.fosters

    At 10 weeks old, Nugget is still very small for his age, but what he lacks in size, he makes up for in charm and personality.

    The sweet kitten has crawled his way into the couple's hearts, and he is there to stay forever.

    Nugget at 9 weeks oldCass @kitten.fosters

    "Everyday we watch Nuggie discover something new and embrace everything with happy tail wags and chirps. He has the cheekiest, most loving and carefree personality," Cass shared with Love Meow.

    Nugget hanging out with his human dadCass @kitten.fosters

    "No matter what the future holds for our boy, we will be there with him all the way, hand in paw. There's nothing we wouldn't do for him. He deserves every chance to live a full long happy life."

    Nugget is 10 weeks old and living life to the fullestCass @kitten.fosters

    Share this story with your friends. Follow Nugget and Cass' fosters on Instagram.

    Related story: Wobbly Kitten with Determined Effort Gets Back on His Paws and Walks Again

  • Two Kittens from Different Litters Share Adorable Bond, They Hope for Dream Home Together
    19 June 2021


    Two kittens are so happy to have found each other, and hope for a dream home together.

    Q-tip and Tina are best of friendsPenny Richards

    Quentin (Q-tip) and Tarantina (Tina), two 3-week-old kittens, crossed paths when they were rescued along with 24 other kittens by Animal Welfare League of Arlington (AWLA) in Arlington, Virginia.

    They were the same age and size, and both needed a friend. When they were paired up in foster care, they instantly hit it off as if they had always been siblings. Penny Richards, a foster volunteer of AWLA, welcomed them into her home a week later.

    "Quentin (a blue colorpoint) was a big baby, and he absolutely refused to wean. He would yell at me for his bottle. Meanwhile, Tina (a tabby) had been eating from a bowl for a while," Penny told Love Meow.

    They are not from the same litter but share an adorable bondPenny Richards

    Q-tip has a diva attitude since the day he set paw in his foster home. He enjoys the company of his people and never hesitates to tell them loudly what he wants.

    "He is incredibly loving and constantly purrs, and loves to cuddle on your lap, but he wants all of your attention all the time. He yells at me if I stop petting him when he's on my lap."

    Q-tip is full of sass and attitudePenny Richards

    His unbridled energy rubs off on his sister from another mister, and together they create all sorts of antics, ruling the roost. "When he's not cuddling, he's running around like a wild child with his best friend, Tarantina."

    The two share a very special bond and have been joined at the hip since the moment they found each other. "Their energy is so well matched, and their personalities complement each other," Penny told Love Meow.

    RawrPenny Richards

    "Quentin would absolutely struggle as a solo kitten, but Tina is everything he needs in a companion."

    They do nearly everything together — cuddling, clamoring for attention, and wrestling one another before passing out in a nap together.

    Penny Richards

    Q-tip has a voracious appetite and is a real food lover. "He may only eat dry food, but that boy would protect it with his life. When his bigger foster friends were still here, he would lie his whole body across the bowl and growl at anyone who dared to come near his food!"

    Watch the two best friends in this cute video:

    Best friends - foster journey www.youtube.com

    Tina is a petite girl with a mighty personality, and Q-tip is a vocal boy who won't take no for an answer. They make a dynamic duo, partners in mischief.

    Both kittens love lap time with their humansPenny Richards

    "Tina is a fun, independent lady who likes to come over for some head scratches and loves to perch on my feet. And then Quentin, 'chaotic energy', is a wild ride," Penny shared with Love Meow.

    Penny Richards

    "Quentin will need to go home with Tina in order to prevent him from going full-blown 'solo kitten syndrome'. His fur is only going to get longer, and will require regular maintenance — daily brushing to avoid mats building up in his fur."

    Best of friendsPenny Richards

    The brother and sister from different mothers are loving their VIP life as spoiled indoor cats. They can't wait to find a special family to share their happily ever after together.

    They are looking for their forever home togetherPenny Richards

    Share this story with your friends. Follow updates on Tina and Q-tip and Penny's fosters on Facebook and Instagram.

    Related story: Cat and Her Only Kitten Share Unbreakable Bond - Journey to Their Dream Home Together

  • Chatty Cats: Chomps, Boredom and More!
    18 June 2021

    Happy Friday! We’re having a little heat wave here in Southern California. So far, no rolling blackouts in our area. We are very thankful for our AC this week. How was your week? Here’s what… More

    The post Chatty Cats: Chomps, Boredom and More! appeared first on Three Chatty Cats.

  • Cat Shows Up on Windowsill, Tells Family He is Ready to Leave Stray Life Behind
    17 June 2021


    A stray cat showed up on a windowsill one day and was ready to leave street life behind.

    Carlton the orange tabby catLittle Wanderers NYC

    An orange cat befriended a young girl when he showed up outside her home in Brooklyn, New York. She began feeding the friendly stray and he just kept coming back.

    When the cat returned late last month, with an injury, he hopped onto the windowsill, crying for help. The young girl and her family were able to rescue him and take him to Little Wanderers NYC, so he could receive the medical attention he needed.

    "Little Wanderers does not turn a blind eye to friendly cats on the street. Carlton (the orange cat) was sick and had a huge cut behind his ear that required sutures," Little Wanderers NYC shared.

    Carlton jumped on the windowsill crying for helpLittle Wanderers NYC

    Despite what he had endured from life on the streets, Carlton was sweet and mellow like a teddy bear. He was estimated to be at least five years old and tested positive for FIV, which doesn't stop him from living a full life.

    Carianne, an experienced fosterer from Staten Island, New York saw Carlton's story through social media and offered to help. "All the rescues right now are overflowing with cats and kittens due to kitten season and also the overblown population spilling over from last year," Carianne told Love Meow.

    Little Wanderers NYC

    When Carlton arrived at his foster home, he was a bit wary of the new environment but quickly found reassurance from his human friends. He was a bit rough around the edges, but a gentle soul with a huge heart.

    He is so pleased to be catered to, and happy that he will never have to worry about food and shelter or fend for himself in the outdoors.

    He is so happy to be safe and have someone to look after himCarianne @kittennursecari

    "A lot of his hair was matted and the ear wound needed a cleaning around the sutures. He is missing many teeth but loved any food I gave him. It was easy to gain his trust because he really does love people. He is so mushy," Carianne told Love Meow.

    The tabby instantly melts into his humans' arms when he is cuddled. He enjoys being in the company of his people and completely immersed in their love.

    The orange tabby has turned into a full-time cuddler. He goes around the house seeking attention and hugs from his foster parents as if to make up for the lost time on the streets.

    "Immediately after I groomed him a bit, he was purring. Now, he really likes to just lay his whole body on my lap and I'm stuck."

    Carlton loves lap time with his humansCarianne @kittennursecari

    "He's like a big friendly mountain lion. He will headbutt you if you're not petting him enough and will flop on his back for belly rubs. He's completely the perfect cat. Whoever ends up adopting him is very very lucky," Carianne shared with Love Meow.

    The sweet tabby has made a full recovery through the help of Little Wanderers NYC. He is now ready to find a place of his very own.

    He has a teddy bear personality and so much to giveCarianne @kittennursecari

    "He is probably the friendliest, chillest cat we have ever met. He is an orange golden boy and an absolute treasure."

    He is now looking for a forever loving homeCarianne @kittennursecari

    Share this story with your friends. Follow Little Wanderers NYC on Facebook and Instagram.

    Related story: Cat Waves at Visitors at Shelter and Hopes Someone Can Take Him Home

  • Not Just for Ferals, HCMT Hosts 13 Free and Low-cost Spay/Neuter Clinics Through December 2021
    17 June 2021
    Pretty Girl

    Shutdowns, physical distancing and unemployment have touched every part of our society, including needs for our pets. Veterinarians closed down all unnecessary surgeries for months in order to protect their staffs and preserve protective equipment and materials. Many people have reduced income or are unemployed and the choice to spay or neuter their cats may be put aside in order to pay bills or buy food. Others are feeding abandoned stray and feral cats and likewise can’t afford to take care of their colonies to prevent more homeless cats on the streets. No one wants to overburden our shelter and rescue systems with unwanted kittens who may end up abandoned.

    Between June and December 2021, covering a large portion of time that contributes to “kitten season”, HCMT has 13 free and low-cost spay/neuter clinics scheduled for stray/feral and rescued/pet cats. You can have your male cat neutered for $40 or female spayed for $55. Surgeries include a state-mandated rabies vaccine.

    If you are caring for community cats, HCMT hosts six clinics where feral cats are spayed or neutered and given a rabies vaccine absolutely free, and other clinics where the cost is $30 per surgery.

    “HCMT has done over 25,000 cat spay/neuter surgeries since we started in 1998!” said Lisa Lendl-Lander, HCMT secretary. With the reproductive lives of that many cats effectively put to an end, imagine how many other kittens didn’t, and won’t, end up out on the streets or in shelters?

    Clinics fill up fast and registration at least two weeks ahead of time is required.

    FREE CLINICS (ferals only)

    • June 26 – Community Cat Network sponsorship
    • July 24 – Sponsored by SNIPP of Indiana,
    • August 21 – half sponsorship in memory of Jeanne T. Richey, half sponsorship anonymous
    • September 18 – In loving memory of Tia’s dad Pat Tiani Jr.
    • October 16 – In loving memory of Art Stina
    • November 13 – open for sponsorship
    • December 11 – open for sponsorship

    FAST TRACK CLINICS

    • July 10
    • August 7
    • September 4
    • October 2
    • October 30
    • November 27

    More dates may be announced and dates are subject to change. Check www.homelesscat.org/clinic-info for the most up to date information.

    Basic costs

    Price include rabies vaccine, flea treatment, and ear mite treatment if necessary. Other vaccines and tests are also available at low cost.

    Feral Cat Package (MANDATORY EAR TIP)

    • FREE CLINICS: no charge
    • FAST TRACK CLINICS: $30 male or female

    Rescue/Pet Cat Package (NO ear tip)

    • Male $40
    • Female $55

    Feral Cats vs Rescue Cats

    A feral cat can’t be handled and will be returned to the outdoor location where it was trapped after surgery.

    A rescue cat either has been or will be adopted as a pet after surgery. Only feral cats are eligible for No-Charge clinics. Both feral and rescue cats can be treated at Fast Track Clinics.

    How to register for a clinic

    All clinics are held at HCMT’s clinic at 207 Allegheny St, Tarentum, PA 15084. You must pre-register for any clinic. Walk-ins are not permitted.

    By Phone: call 412-321-4060 and leave a message with your name and phone number. Someone will return your call and complete your pre-registration. HCMT is all volunteer and this may take some time.

    By Email: Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with your name, number of spots you need and which date you are registering for. You will receive a confirmation email ONLY if you are registered.

    Feral cats must arrive in a standard humane box trap (Havahart, Safe-guard, Tomahawk, Tru-Catch, etc.) for the safety of all involved. Rescue and owned cats can arrive in carriers, one cat per carrier. Each will be placed back in its carrier or trap for recovery after surgery.

    Ready to reproduce at four months, two to four litters per year

    Cats can begin reproducing as young as four months old. Typical unspayed female cat can have an average of two litters per year with an average of four. Her kittens can be ready to produce kittens four months after they are born.

    But kittens can be spayed and neutered as young as two months, weighing at least two pounds, and even if they are born outdoors to a feral mother they can still be socialized to be adoptable and find homes, all those extra kittens never need to be born. Clinics in the spring and summer often treat over 100 cats at each clinic, roughly twice each month, and more with trapping and rescuing cats between clinics.

    What is the Homeless Cat Management Team?

    The Homeless Cat Management Team is a freestanding “Trap-Neuter-Return” (TNR) organization in the Pittsburgh region. Their mission is to lead the way in ending the overpopulation of companion animals in our region by providing high-volume, high-quality, low-cost sterilization. We also assist and support community cat caretakers who work with HCMT with trapping, transportation, cat food and shelter and veterinary care. Volunteers also assess all kittens and friendly cats HCMT has rescued for adoptability and socialization, and after spay/neuter and age-appropriate vaccines offers them for adoption through their sister organization, a network of volunteer foster homes called Pittsburgh C.A.T.

    Volunteer for clinics

    HCMT also needs volunteers for clinics, up to 20 per clinic for various duties and different shifts, with most of them not requiring medical training. On the website you’ll find a link to the signup to volunteer for any of the clinics that are scheduled. Volunteer help is appreciated in other ways too, like helping with the laundry that’s produced with all the sheets, blankets, beds and other items used in the clinic. Call Homeless Cat Management Team hotline and leave a message, 412-321-4060 or visit www.homelesscat.org to find more information and to find links to our Facebook groups.

    Support, donate and sponsor

    The free clinics are by $1,500 sponsorships by one or more donors. Consider sponsoring one this coming spring, yourself, your business or an organization—send an email with your contact information and details to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    # # #

     

    .

    Gifts featuring cats you know! Visit Portraits of Animals

    Fine ArtPhotographyGiftsGreeting CardsBooksCommissioned Portraits & Artwork

    Great Rescues Day Book:
    Portraits, Rescue Stories, Holidays and Events, Essential Feline Information, All in One Book Great Rescues Day Book

    Each month features one of my commissioned portraits of a feline or felines and their rescue story along with a kitty quote on the left page and on the right page the month name with enough lines for all possible dates, with standard holidays and animal-themed observances and events. Great Rescues also includes a mini cat-care book illustrated with my drawings including information on finding strays or orphaned kittens, adopting for the first time or caring for a geriatric cat, a list of household toxins and toxic plants, or helping stray and feral cats and beginning with TNR.

    Each book includes also 10 sheets of my “22 Cats” decorative notepaper with a collage of all the portraits in black and white so you can make your own notes or write special notes to friends.

    The portraits in this book, collected as a series, won both a Certificate of Excellence and a Muse Medallion in the 2011 Cat Writers’ Association Annual Communication Contest, as well as the 22 Cats Notepaper mentioned below.

    Read more and order.

    Copyright

    All images and text used on this site are copyrighted to Bernadette E. Kazmarski unless otherwise noted and may not be used without my written permission, although links to your site are more than welcome and are shared. Please ask if you are interested in using and image or story in a print or internet publication. If you are interested in purchasing a print of an image or a product including it, check my animal and nature website Portraits of Animals to see if I have it available already. If you don’t find it there, visit Ordering Custom Artwork for more information on a custom greeting card, print or other item.

    Subscribe to my e-newsletter

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    © 2021www.TheCreativeCat.netPublished by Bernadette E. Kazmarski Weekly schedule of features:

    Sunday: Essays, Pet Loss, Poetry, The Artist’s Life Monday: Adoptable Cats, TNR & Shelters Tuesday: Rescue Stories Wednesday: Commissioned Portrait or Featured Artwork Thursday: New Merchandise Friday: Book Review, Health and Welfare, Advocacy Saturday: Your Backyard Wildlife Habitat, Living Green With Pets, Creating With Cats And sometimes, I just throw my hands in the air and have fun!

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    The post Not Just for Ferals, HCMT Hosts 13 Free and Low-cost Spay/Neuter Clinics Through December 2021 appeared first on The Creative Cat.

  • Cat Kept Her Unborn Kittens from the Cold Until Help Arrived, Now Has Her Dream Come True
    17 June 2021


    A cat kept her unborn kittens from harsh weather until help arrived. Months later, she finally had her dream come true.

    Camilla the cat and her kittensCatsnip Etc

    Early this year, a tortoiseshell cat was spotted on the side of the road by a Good Samaritan (from Indiana) who was driving by the area. The stray was covered in ice and snow and curled up into a ball, desperately trying to stay warm.

    "The Good Samaritan immediately turned around and scooped her up. She was so friendly and sweet and never stopped purring," Missy McNeal of Catsnip Etc told Love Meow.

    Volunteers of Catsnip Etc picked her up the next day and got her situated into a loving foster home. They didn't know what happened to her prior to being found, but discovered some scratches on the cat and that some of her toenails were injured.

    Catsnip Etc

    They named the tortie Camilla, and she was an instant love-bug to everyone she came across. Two days after arrival, she gave birth to a litter of four healthy kittens in a comfortable place, away from the elements of the outdoors.

    Camilla adored her kittens and catered to their every need. "The first day, she would sit up and cover her kittens to protect them. Once she knew we wanted to help her, she was more than happy to let us check on the little ones," Missy shared with Love Meow.

    She was a wonderful cat momCatsnip Etc

    Camilla was underweight and didn't produce enough milk to feed all the hungry months. Volunteers started supplementing her litter around the clock to make sure that they were healthy and that their bellies were kept full.

    "She was malnourished and very skinny when she was found. She didn't mind at all when we came to help feed her kittens. She knew they needed the extra help and she seemed very grateful."

    Coco, Cora, Chanel and CarlCatsnip Etc

    The kittens (Coco, Cora, Chanel, and Carl) were eating like champs and never lacked an ounce of love. With a bountiful supply of food, Camilla started to put on weight. She kept her kittens close when she replenished herself, and watched over them every step of the way.

    "At 4 1/2 weeks old, the kittens were getting to the fun stage where their personalities were starting to show," the rescue shared. "They were climbing cat trees when their mom wasn't paying attention."

    Catsnip Etc

    When the kittens were big enough to venture out of the nest on their own, Camilla started to loosen up her grip but still kept a watchful eye on them. She was so content knowing that her babies would never have to spend a day on the street.

    Camilla watched her kittens blossom into healthy, playful teens and was ready to let them spread their wings and fly. She began to spend more time with her people, demanding attention and soaking up all the love.

    Catsnip Etc

    All four kittens quickly found good homes when they were old enough, but Camilla found herself still waiting for that special family to come her way. She would stand by the glass wall and hope someone would stop for her.

    One by one, many other cats left the adoption center with their forever humans. "She was the only one left in our adoption room after a busy day of adoptions."

    Catsnip Etc

    A week later on Memorial Day, a family came to visit Camilla. They were completely enamored by the sweet tortie who greeted them with snuggles and loud purrs.

    Catsnip Etc

    Camilla kept her purr motor running strong as they held her in their arms and made her a permanent part of their family.

    Three and a half months after she was rescued, the tortie finally had her dream come true!

    Camilla found her forever humansCatsnip Etc

    "She is going to love being the queen of her new house and getting all the attention."

    Catsnip Etc

    Share this story with your friends Follow Catsnip Etc on Facebook and Instagram.

    Related story: Cat with Sweet Smile Finds Help to Raise Her Kittens and Never Has to Wander the Streets Again

  • Thank You! 6/11/21
    16 June 2021

     

     

     

                                                                        Amazon wish list =>

     https://smile.amazon.com/hz/charitylist/ls/1MLEKD95D2HY4

     Chewy wish list =>
     https://www.chewy.com/g/blind-cat-rescue-sanctuary-inc_b72565986

    WalMart wish list =>
    http://www.walmart.com/registry/registryforgood/7038e2b3-bfdb-49a2-b78a-3c7d23e1a3af/

    Thank you Bhavana for all the food!

    Thank you Alana Fletcher & Wendy Boulet for the food!

    Thank you Marina Krivnko for the food!

    Thank you Amy Coker Pascoe for the toys!

    Thank you Pat Griser for the food, dish soap and laundry soap!

    Thank you unnamed for the trash bags and cleaning cloths, the awesome scratchers, food, syringes, cat litter, gas drops, toys, treats, laundry soap, probiotics, dish soap and calming collars!
    They didn't tell us who you are so we could call out your names. 
    We are very grateful for your generosity!


    Thank you Lynn Rupp for all the food, laundry soap, syringes, gas drops, bleach,
    cat litter, probiotics, and dish soap!

    Thank you Christina Berry for the laundry soap!

    Thank you Shari Bahner for the food, syringes and catnip toys!!

    Thank you Debbie Wass for the food, treats, syringes and dish soap!

     

    Thank you Perry & Kitties for the bleach!

    Thank you Alan Fletcher & Wendy Boulet for all the food!

    Thank you P&H Furman for the treats!

    Thank you Pat Griser for the reusable bamboo towels!

    Thank you Christina Berry for the dish soap!

    Thank you Trudie & Roy Buri for the syringes!

    Thank you unnamed for the trash bags and cleaning cloths, the awesome scratchers, food, syringes, cat litter, gas drops, toys, treats, laundry soap, probiotics, dish soap and calming collars!

    Thank you unnamed for the air conditioners!






  • Dora Needs Your Help!
    16 June 2021

    June 15 Update: After trying a less-invasive procedure to “get things moving” yesterday, Dora’s vets had to put her back under general anesthesia earlier today for her surgeon to very carefully remove more of the blockage.  She’s now awake from her procedure, and we are waiting on the results!

    June 13 Update: Dora’s initial surgery on Friday was a success, but she isn’t recovering as fast as hoped. The poor little girl is having trouble passing her impacted fecal matter, so instead of coming home on Saturday, she has remained at CTVRC, where she will receive 24-hour care for as long as necessary. Thank you for your continued support!!

    – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 

    Dora is an 8-week-old adventurous and curious kitty known for her love of cuddles and gentle kisses. 

    On June 9th, Dora was brought to the vet because she was showing signs of severe constipation. Unfortunately, Dora was diagnosed with an extremely rare birth defect: an Imperforate Anus, in other words, she was born without a butthole.

    Dora has miraculously survived to 8 weeks without ever being able to pass a bowel movement (although she gets in the litterbox and tries), and she has a painful and life-threatening amount of fecal matter built up in her colon.

    In addition to being born without an anal clearing, Dora also has a tear between her colon and her vagina. Dora needs immediate life-saving surgery to construct an anus, reroute her insides and repair the tear. 

    The surgery alone will cost about $6,500, and Dora will need extensive aftercare, follow-ups, and continuing treatment, given the very high risk of complications (such as infections) and permanent damage.

    Dora’s short and long-term care costs are highly uncertain, and at a minimum are expected to exceed $10,000. If we raise more generous donations than her care ends up costing, every dollar will go towards rescuing and providing vet care to other street cats in need.

    Annex Cat Rescue is a volunteer-run rescue and we rely entirely on donations. We want to provide Dora the best care possible, but we need your help! 

    Will you help Dora keep exploring? 

    To donate, please visit this site.

  • Cat Befriends Every Kitten He Meets After His Life Was Turned Around
    16 June 2021


    A tabby cat is giving other kittens the same love that he received when he was rescued.

    Bubblegum the cat adores other kittens in needAlley Cat Rescue

    Baby Bubblegum had all the odds stacked up against him when he came to Alley Cat Rescue in Los Angeles. He was just half the size of his siblings and battling a host of health issues.

    "He was just 71 grams when we got him at 10 days old. He was so little and frail at first that he kept falling over when we weighed him," Alley Cat Rescue told Love Meow.

    When his litter mates began to play and run, Bubblegum would waddle up to them and try to be in the middle of all the action.

    Bubblegum was much smaller than his siblingsAlley Cat Rescue

    The pint-sized kitten was given daily supplemental care to ensure that he continued to make gains. At two months old, he finally reached the one-pound milestone. "He was not quite big enough to jump over the walls, but could chase your feet and climb on laps and snooze."

    Bubblegum was about two months behind in development. When his siblings had all gone to their forever homes, he still had a lot of growing to do.

    Alley Cat Rescue

    After many trips to the vet, they were able to give the kitten an official diagnosis to explain his health issues. Bubblegum had a congenital defect (liver shunt), but with the right medication and proper diet, the sweet kitten was finally on the mend.

    "Bubblegum is the chief inspector and finder of places to nap. He thinks everything is exciting and is always in on the action," the rescue shared.

    Bubblegum and his litter mateAlley Cat Rescue

    "He plays in every box that comes through the house. He looks so forward to us getting rid of all the stuff that come inside his boxes so he can play, sleep and hang in his space."

    Knowing how much he enjoyed the company of other cats, they began to introduce him to other fosters.

    Bubblegum loves cardboard boxesAlley Cat Rescue

    Around that time, the rescue took in a tuxedo named Atticus who was in need of critical care. He was nursed back to health, gained a voracious appetite and really filled out.

    While he was being bottle fed around the clock, Bubblegum could hear his little cries and was eager for the day when the kitten was ready to come out and play.

    Atticus the kittenAlley Cat Rescue

    When Atticus was one month old, he was paired up with another singleton tuxedo, Sheffield, who was about his age. They quickly became bonded friends.

    "They have been inseparable since the moment they met. They cuddle at night, and play and wrestle when they are awake."

    Atticus and Sheffield share an adorable bondAlley Cat Rescue

    Bubblegum was over the moon when he met not one, but two tuxedos. They instantly hit it off as if they had always been friends.

    The tabby boy has taken the role of big brother and is teaching the youngsters how to be a proper cat. He takes them to his favorite sunbathing spot and gives them their mandatory baths.

    Bubblegum takes the kittens under his wingAlley Cat Rescue

    Bubblegum has been a great help looking after the kittens. He plays with them and curls up next to them when they nap.

    "He is super social with other cats and has played, snuggled and befriended many fosters. He also hangs just as easy with dogs," Alley Cat Rescue shared with Love Meow.

    Alley Cat Rescue

    Sweet Bubblegum has passed every health check and is now ready to find a place of his very own.

    "He is super sweet, loves to sleep under the covers at night, jump on your lap while you are working and just help around the home," Alley Cat Rescue wrote. "He keeps an eye on your litter box scooping technique, and makes sure you always keep the cat food bowls full and tasty treats handy."

    Alley Cat Rescue

    The pint-sized wonder has transformed into a gorgeous tabby. He is a wonderful, caring friend to every foster he comes across.

    Alley Cat Rescue

    Share this story with your friends. Bubblegum is up for adoption in the Southern California area. Follow Alley Cat Rescue on Facebook and Instagram.

    Related story: Cat Found Covered in Snow and Ice, Got Her Kittens Help Just in Time So They Could Thrive

  • Is Kitty Allergic to YOU?
    15 June 2021
    Photo by mali maeder from Pexels
    by Nomi Berger
     
    Have you ever observed that your kitty’s allergy symptoms seem to worsen the more time you spend together? Have you ever considered the possibility that she may be allergic to you?
     
    While extremely rare, scientists say that cats can indeed be allergic to people, but that our frequent bathing and showering assists in reducing our own dander and allergens. It’s far more likely, then, that your cat’s not allergic to YOU but to the products you either use on your skin or to clean your home.
     
    Among the telltale signs of her sensitivity to these products are: itchiness and reddened skin, fur loss and open sores, rodent ulcers and swollen or inflamed lips. She may also develop chronic sneezing.
     
    Consider the following culprits that may cause an irritation of your cat’s respiratory system: perfumes, body sprays with high-scent fragrances and heavily perfumed body washes; scented laundry detergents and fabric softeners; air freshener plug-ins, scented waxes, essential oils and incense, and the smoke and nicotine from cigarettes.
     
    To minimize many of these potential irritants, invest in a vacuum with a HEPA filter that traps allergens such as dust mites, pollen, mold, tobacco particles, your dander and skin cells rather than sending them back into the air. Eliminate, wherever possible, everything that’s heavily perfumed or even moderately scented -- from your personal products to your laundry products. And to keep your air not only fresh but clean, use several small activated charcoal pillows instead of scented plug-ins.
     
    If, however, you suspect that your cat IS allergic to you, discuss it with your vet who will, in all likelihood, refer you to a dermatologist. Just as with people, the dermatologist will run a series of tests on your cat by pricking her skin with a small amount of various suspected allergens to see how she responds. And should she be one of those very rare kitties who react to your dander or hair, it doesn’t mean that you have to give her up.
     
    Again, as with people, there are several forms of treatment available, depending on her symptoms and the severity of those symptoms. And although there’s no cure for allergies at the moment, allergy injections, antihistamines or even cortisone can be used to both provide her with the relief she needs and the reassurance you need to live happily ever after.
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